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81.

Celiac Disease [electronic resource]

Nearly three million Americans suffer from celiac disease, a hereditary, autoimmune digestive disorder which is difficult to diagnose. Discover how a gluten-free diet (no wheat, rye, or barley) results in greatly improved health for those suffering from this disease.
Online
2010
82.

Geriatric Oncology [electronic resource]

As people grow older, the likelihood of getting a cancer diagnosis increases, but there is no one standard treatment for older patients. Beverly Barr Vaughan was diagnosed and treated for colon cancer at the age of 77. Follow this passionate discussion as Beverly and the experts delve into the issue of chronological age versus physiological age.
Online
2012
83.

Female Sexual Dysfunction [electronic resource]: Second Opinion

Sexual response is influenced by biological, social, psychological and cultural factors. Led by Dr. Peter Salgo, panelists discuss whether and how doctors address sexuality within patient care. Their discussion includes the case study for this week, 58-year-old Dora, who has lost interest in sex.
Online
2009
84.

Hip Fracture [electronic resource]

A hip fracture caused by a fall is a great fear and a reality for our aging population. Getting treatment and proper rehabilitation is key to getting mobility and independence back after a fall.
Online
2009
85.

Inflammation [electronic resource]

Research indicates that inflammation underscores a significant percentage of heart disease, and some professionals believe that it may be the source of many complications of aging. Our panelists explore the relationship between inflammation and disease, and what new treatments lie ahead.
Online
2007
86.

Kidney Stones [electronic resource]

Some say passing a kidney stone is more painful than childbirth. People have been suffering from kidney stones since the beginning of time, and the incidents continue to rise. What are kidney stones, how are they treated, and more importantly, can they be prevented? (27 minutes)
Online
2006
87.

Late Effects of Cancer Treatment [electronic resource]

Treatment of cancer involves the use of strong drugs that target cancer cells with the goal of curing the patient. Often, however, these life-saving treatments can leave a wake of long-term physical and mental side effects that patients may not be prepared for. Once treatment is over, follow-up care is critical.
Online
2010
88.

Moving Beyond the Annual Flu Shot [electronic resource]

Scientists are one step closer to a flu vaccine that could last for years.
Online
2013
89.

Ouch-Free Medical Tape [electronic resource]

Bioengineers create new medical bandage for the sensitive skin of newborns and elderly patients.
Online
2012
90.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse [electronic resource]

An estimated 50% of women between the ages of 50 and 79 have some form of prolapse, yet most have never heard of it. Learn about a common problem many women may be too embarrassed to talk about.
Online
2011
91.

Small Screens May Create Eyestrain, But Not Visual Damage, Researchers Find [electronic resource]

Researches found that the use of small screens can lead to discomfort, but not eye damage.
Online
2012
92.

Ultrasound Can Heal Chronic Wounds [electronic resource]

Sound waves could speed up the healing of open wounds.
Online
2013
93.

The Mind Reader [electronic resource]: Unlocking My Voice

In a world exclusive, Panorama follows a group of severely brain injured patients and reveals the revolutionary efforts made to help them communicate with their families and the outside world. They witness the moment when a patient regarded as vegetative for more than a decade is able to answer a series of questions whilst inside a brain scanner. The findings have profound implications for the patients and their families, as well as ethical consequences for scientists and medical staff.
Online
2013
94.

India: Medical Tourism

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India's booming private healthcare system is expected to be worth billions of dollars in the decades to come, as westerners flock to India to get healthy. Fed up with long lines and exorbitant fees at home, these patients can now fly to the subcontinent and go straight to the front of the line for cheap operations in newly built, hi-tech hospitals. Averill Dollery who lives in Worcestershire in the U.K.suffers from chronic pain; a pinched nerve in her back is destroying her quality of life. Averill can't get an operation to fix her back because the National Health Service considers that her weight problem would make the spinal surgery she requires too dangerous. But salvation is at hand - in the form of India's Doctor Prathap Reddy. Reddy is a cardiologist, a medical entrepreneur and [...]
Online
2007
95.

What's Ailing Medicine?: With Walter Cronkite

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What s Ailing Medicine examines the shortcomings of medical care in America and the prospects for finding a cures as the nation debates a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reform our health care system. How can we provide health care for the 37 million Americans who currently lack insurance? How can we provide peace of mind for 50 million Americans whose insurance is so inadequate that a serious illness would cause financial ruin? With medical expenses rising at twice the rate of inflation, how can soaring costs be controlled? This program presents the human side of these complex and controversial dilemmas by considering the perspectives of the three major players in the health care debate - patients, providers, and payers. The first of What s Ailing Medicine's three segments deals [...]
Online
1994
96.

Who Lives, Who Dies: Rationing Health Care

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This powerful documentary shows that despite America's extraordinary medical resources, our health care system is failing a large part of the population. One out of six Americans has no coverage and cannot afford basic care. They must rely on public clinics whose funding is shrinking. We see a woman with a malignancy that spread because she couldn t get treatment; a man with high blood pressure who suffered a cerebral hemorrhage because he could not afford medication; a woman in labor who was not accepted at two hospitals because she had no insurance. Poor children are at greatest risk. In the U.S., which ranks 20th in infant mortality, nearly 40,000 infants die every year because they are born prematurely with low birth weight. Two-thirds of these deaths occur among mothers with lit [...]
Online
1988
97.

Battlefield Medicine

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During the Civil War, medical science is pushed to the limit in the battle against wounds and disease.
Online
1994
98.

The Battle of Fredericksburg

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In the first part Union delays and blunders give the Rebels new hope at Fredericksburg. In the second part medical science is pushed to the limit in the war against wounds and disease.
Online
1994
99.

Interview With George Cantero, 1981 [electronic resource]

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George Cantero served as a medic in Vietnam. He describes a high level of drug use by American soldiers. He also describes declining morale among the troops as a result of military policies and de-escalation, recounting the "fragging" or attack of a superior officer as one example. Finally, he discusses the withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam and his own return to the United States.
Online
1983
100.

Interview With le van Tri, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Le Van Tri discusses his medical work treating fallen Viet Cong soldiers in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He describes working under difficult conditions at Bach Mai Hospital, where the operating room was located underground and lit by oil lamps. He also describes the bombing of the hospital and day-to-day struggles to provide medical care in a war zone.
Online
1983