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1.

Global Media

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VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
2.

Culture Jam: Hijacking Commercial Culture

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Pranksters and subversive artists attempt to cause a bit of brand damage to corporate mindshare. "We follow three outlandish jammers: media tigress Carly Stasko, Reverend Billy of the Church of Stop Shopping, and Jack Napier with the Billboard Liberation Front. Armed with the tools of their trade, these jammers hijack, subvert and reclaim corporate media space."--Container.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
3.

The Crisis of the Cultural Environment: Media & Democracy in the 21st Century

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Turning to issues of media policy, George Berbner delivers a stinging indictment of the way the so-called ìnformation superhighway' is being constructed. By examing the logic of globalization, he shows the ineffectual nature of our present responses - such as the v-chip - to deal with the urgen crisis of the media. Showing the real uses to which the ìnformation superhighway' will be put by its corporate masters, he urges the citizens of the world to struggle for democratic principles in the cultural environment.
VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Reflections on a Global Screen [electronic resource]

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Addresses the rapid globalization of the media, a trend that some countries fear will homogenize culture, forcing out programs that reflect individual cultural values. Reveals how media globalization is a two-way street, citing how Hong Kong stations can transmit their local broadcasts to Chinese populations in Europe and the United States, while CNN can offer worldwide coverage from Atlanta.
Online
1996
5.

She Says [electronic resource]: Women in News

In this classic program, ten pioneering female journalists talk about the difficulty they had breaking into what was once a male-dominated profession. The documentary highlights their struggle to be taken seriously and the impact they eventually had on news reporting. Anna Quindlen recalls the drama of covering Geraldine Ferraro's 1984 bid for vice president, and Nina Totenberg and Narda Zacchino discuss the significance of female journalists reporting on the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hall sexual harassment case. Carole Simpson, the first African-American female network anchor, details how news typically comes from a "white, male perspective" despite the diverse makeup of her own newsroom, and Helen Thomas gives credit to earlier newswomen, such as Barbara Walters, who helped break down [...]
Online
2001
6.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Megan Kamerick - Women Should Represent Women in Media

What's the best way to tell women's stories? Ask women to tell them. At TEDxABQ, reporter Megan Kamerick shows how the news media underrepresents women as reporters and news sources-and because of that tells an incomplete story.
Online
2012
7.

This Space Available [electronic resource]: Outdoor Advertising and the Fight Against Visual Pollution

With billboards choking cityscapes around the world, a global grassroots movement has sprouted that is uniting concerned citizens with visionary politicians, enlightened business leaders, and outraged street artists in a fight against visual pollution. This Space Available explores efforts to reclaim commercially usurped public spaces as it takes an incisive look at the differences between the Baby Boomer generation, which spawned the excess in advertising, and today's young adults-the most marketed-to generation in history. Complex issues of economics, urban development, public space, aesthetics, and more are confronted as the documentary grapples with the question of who public space is for.
Online
2011
8.

Programming the Nation? [electronic resource]: The History of Subliminal Messaging in America

With eye-opening footage, expert interviews, and many humorous anecdotes, this provocative program explores the alleged use of subliminal messages in advertising, music, film, politics, and the military. Documentarian Jeff Warrick leads viewers through the subconscious mind while examining the history, scientific validity, and potential effects of such techniques on society. From hidden sexual imagery in Disney cartoons and satanic messages in rock music to the now-discredited experiment where "Drink Coca-Cola" was flashed between frames at a cinema, Warrick challenges his audience to question whether subliminal programming is an urban legend, or if these manipulative tactics could actually alter human behavior.
Online
2011
9.

The Media and Human Rights [electronic resource]

A drop in popularity of the Hungarian conservative political party Fidesz led to charges of liberal bias on the part of the media there. The media became a scapegoat for the defeat of the party in the 1994 parliamentary elections. This episode explores the lack of media independence in post-communist Hungary and the neo-conservative's attempt to control public television and radio. Andrew Tyndall reports on how the media covers itself. Also featured are reports on the growing number of journalists who are killed while on assignment and a profile of Belgrade's B-92, a radio station that mixes music with anti-war activism in Serbia's capital.
Online
1994
10.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Distracted From Democracy

Across the world - Egypt, Greece, Spain, Brazil - citizens are turning angrily to their governments to demand economic fair play and equality. But here in America, with few exceptions, the streets and airwaves remain relatively silent. In a country as rich and powerful as America, why is there so little outcry about the ever-increasing, deliberate divide between the very wealthy and everyone else? In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill is joined by media scholar Marty Kaplan, who points to a number of forces keeping these issues and affected citizens in the dark - especially our well-fed appetite for media distraction.
Online
2013
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Don Tapscott - Four Principles for the Open World

Recent generations have been bathed in technology from birth, says futurist Don Tapscott, and as a result the world is transforming into one that is far more open and transparent. In this inspiring TEDTalk, he lists the four core principles that show how this open world can be a far better place.
Online
2012
12.

Women and Media [electronic resource]

Dr. Cindy Lont from George Mason University hosts this fast-moving program that features visuals of past and present media as well as interviews with Dr. Maurine Beasley, Sheila Gibbons, and Junior Bridge - all foundational scholars in the field of women and media. The program focuses on four areas: the reclaimed history of women who created media; the media portrayal of women; women's inclusion in the media workforce; and how men perceive media differently than women, which affects what we read, see, and hear from the media.
Online
2006
13.

Knowledge and Progress: Part 2 [electronic resource]

What is the meaning and scope of images today? Bombarded by thousands of images every day, what do we really see? In a constantly changing world, socially and politically engaged creators are searching for new ways to capture our attention. Filmmaker Helen Doyle has chosen the work of several artists and photographers who provoke us into looking deeper at the outside world and at ourselves.
Online
2013
14.

Sexual Stereotypes in Media [electronic resource]: Superman and the Bride

This program explores the history of sexual stereotypes as presented in the media. Film clips, television advertisements and sitcoms, and so-called documentaries from the 1940s, 50s, and 60s show men as domineering masters, and women as their doting subordinates. As a classroom teaching tool, the program encourages discussions regarding the media's continuing role in reinforcing sexual stereotypes, as well as the ongoing sexual biases that nurture them.
Online
1975
15.

Talk, Talk, Talk [electronic resource]: Opinion or Fact?

Radio and television bombard people with information every day. Each person must sort through and assimilate all of the information into ideals, beliefs, and truths of their own. But how does a person do this? How much influence do the words and ideas of other people have on individuals forming their own opinions? This program examines the conditioning of information in our society and its impact upon forming public attitudes, the role of the media in polling, and the significance of the public's voice in shaping individual opinions. Among those featured on this program are various talk radio hosts and participants at the 1995 National Radio Talk Shows of America Convention.
Online
1995
16.

The Real Dirt on Gossip [electronic resource]

More than 50 million North Americans every week read gossip magazines, reality TV shows are exploding in popularity, Twitter feeds buzz incessantly with rumors, and office conversation continually feeds the innuendo mill. But while this kind of talk can indeed be nasty when idle chatter turns out to be a lie, gossip can also be beneficial. Researchers now say that gossip often serves as a tool for allowing people to gauge their own moral behavior, and through its dissemination of information, may provide clues as to what is acceptable conduct within a specific social environment. This program explores the science, the history, and the evolutionary dynamic of gossip and takes a look at its impact on popular culture.
Online
2012
17.

Aggression [electronic resource]: Is Violence Learned?

Do children who watch violent TV shows become violent themselves, or is anyone from any background capable of murder? This program explores two theories of extreme aggression: that it is learned from media and other elements of one's social environment, and that it can be induced by the command of authority figures. Research into violence is illustrated using Milgram's conformity experiments, Hannah Arendt's ideas about "the banality of evil" in Nazi concentration camps, the Columbine shootings, and the tragic case of James Bulger, a toddler who was murdered in 1993 by two 10-year-olds from abusive households.
Online
2013
18.

The Rise of the Television Talk Show [electronic resource]

Because of low production costs and high ratings, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of television talk shows in recent years. Some are anchored by former news personalities and others by former stand-up comedians. In the age of the talk show, it is often difficult to distinguish between opinion and fact in modern culture. How many of the talk shows are informative programs, and how many are pure entertainment? Each program claims to have its own expert on every subject imaginable. Yet, the integrity of some shows is questionable. This program looks at the phenomenon known as the television talk show and the public's fascination with it. Featured on the program are Phil Donahue, and Vicki Abt, a sociologist at Penn State University.
Online
1995
19.

Media Manipulation [electronic resource]: New Game for Big Business

Many newspapers, magazines, television and cable networks, and local television and radio stations are owned by large corporations with diverse interests outside of their media holdings-from the defense industry to theme parks. This program examines the relationship between the large corporate owners and the daily operation of their media outlets. It reveals how much power and control owners exercise over news judgment, and suggests that corporate controllers may be practicing their own brand of media censorship by slanting the news. Can Americans believe what they read, see, and hear?
Online
1998
20.

Is TV Going Down the Tube? [electronic resource]

Has television programming been degraded by the drive to deliver high ratings and preferred demographic groups to advertisers? In this far-ranging and insightful debate moderated by syndicated columnist and author Ben Wattenberg, William Baker, President and CEO of WNET, and George Dessart, professor of media studies - coauthors of Down the Tube: An Inside Account of the Failure of American Television - defend their thesis against Irwin Stelzer, of the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, who argues that networks simply give the public what it really wants.
Online
1998