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Mass Media — Social Aspects
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1.

Miss Representation

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Discusses ways in which the media openly degrades women. Features commentary from many influential women in media and politics.
DVD
2012; 2011
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Dreamworlds 3: Desire, Sex & Power in Music Video

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A look at how the narratives of music videos shape individual & cultural attitudes toward femininity, masculinity, sexuality and race.
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Miss Representation

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Explores how mainstream media contributes to the under-representation of women in influential positions in America and challenges the media's limiting and often disparaging portrayals of women, which make it difficult for the average girl to see herself as powerful.
DVD
2011
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Spin the Bottle: Sex, Lies and Alcohol

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"By exploring the college party scene, Spin the Bottle shows the difficulties students have in navigating a cultural environment saturated with messages about gender and alcohol"--Container.
DVD
2004
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

Wet Dreams and False Images

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An award winning documentary film that uses humor to serious concerns about the marketplace of commercial illusion and unrealizable standards of physical perfection."--Publisher's website.
VHS
2004
Ivy (By Request)
6.

Dreamworlds 2: Desire/Sex/Power in Music Video ; Dreamworlds : Desire/Sex/Power in Rock Video

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Shows scenes from over 165 music videos to illustrate how women are portrayed in male-created videos, examining such issues as masculinity, femininity, sex, and sex roles. Questions the impact that the portrayal of sex and sexual relations in mass media have on society and culture in our everyday life. Includes a scene of a brutal gang rape from the movie, The accused.
DVD
2002
Clemons (Stacks)
7.

The Crisis of the Cultural Environment: Media & Democracy in the 21st Century

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Turning to issues of media policy, George Berbner delivers a stinging indictment of the way the so-called ìnformation superhighway' is being constructed. By examing the logic of globalization, he shows the ineffectual nature of our present responses - such as the v-chip - to deal with the urgen crisis of the media. Showing the real uses to which the ìnformation superhighway' will be put by its corporate masters, he urges the citizens of the world to struggle for democratic principles in the cultural environment.
VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
8.

The Killing Screens: Media and the Culture of Violence

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Explores why there is so much violence on television and its effects on viewers. Addresses psychological, political, social, and developmental impacts of growing and living within a cultural environment of pervasive, ritualized violent representation. Suggests new ways of thinking about the negative effects of mass media on society, and discusses what can be done. Questions and ideas are based on the results of a 20-year ongoing study, the Cultural Indicators Project, by Dr. George Gerbner.
VHS
1994
Ivy (By Request)
9.

Political Communication and Mass Communication [electronic resource]: Steven H. Chaffee

Steven H. Chaffee, communication scholar, theorist, historian, methodologist, and teacher, discusses his work in political communication and how mass communication affects research.
Online
2008
10.

McCarthy Trials [electronic resource]: An Exploration Through Archival Film

Presenting archival footage from the anti-communist turmoil of the 1950s, this program takes viewers back to an America turning against itself, an America pushed into a state of paranoia by one man-Senator Joseph McCarthy. Historian Ben Walsh serves as a helpful guide to these newsreel materials while also making use of insightful excerpts on the topic from the 1984 Bill Moyers series A Walk Through the 20th Century (item 42066, Post-War Hopes, Cold War Dreams). Looking at McCarthy's tactics in naming and punishing alleged communist activists and supporters, as well as his use and manipulation of the media, the program is a valuable resource not only for teaching about postwar America, but also for instruction in the use of archival films.
Online
2006
11.

The Jazz Age [electronic resource]: An Exploration Through Archival Film

Emerging from the First World War as a leading economic and geopolitical power, America entered a phase of unprecedented prosperity and cultural change-an era often described as the Jazz Age. In this program, teacher and historian Ben Walsh uses archival and newsreel footage to outline and comment on the period, from the Treaty of Versailles to the Wall Street crash of 1929. The video incorporates materials from the North American Records Administration and helps shed artistic light on the Jazz Age with modern versions of the era's music. In addition, the video can assist in sparking discussion about the uses and interpretation of archival films.
Online
2006
12.

Cuban Missile Crisis [electronic resource]: An Exploration Through Archival Film

Compiled by author, teacher, and curriculum advisor Ben Walsh, this program features 11 extracts on the Cuban missile crisis from various film archive sources. Clip selections and Walsh's commentary are organized around the following three topics: the build-up to the crisis, the actions and decisions of President John F. Kennedy in confronting the threat, and the outcome of the conflict in geopolitical terms. Specific film sources include One Week in October, a 1964 Defense Department documentary; Duck and Cover, a public information film from 1951; President Kennedy's address to the nation televised on October 22, 1962; Cuban Crisis, a newsreel from 1962; and Blockade Lifted, a newsreel from 1962.
Online
2006
13.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Kathleen Hall Jamieson on Political Advertising

Amidst the mudslinging, campaign promises, and scare tactics, what is really being said in those highly produced political ads? In this program, Bill Moyers talks with one of America's leading political and media analysts, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the Annenberg School of Communication and author of Everything You Think You Know About Politics. And Why You're Wrong. Through astute analysis, Jamieson deconstructs more than a dozen TV commercials used by politicians and public interest groups, homing in on their visual and rhetorical methods to expose their actual agendas of issue advocacy. Together, Jamieson and Moyers discuss the significance of these ads in the contexts of future elections and American politics in general.
Online
2005; 2003
14.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: Daniel Yankelovich on Public Opinion Research

Opinion polls are said to be the voice of America; Daniel Yankelovich has been listening for the last 40 years. In this program, Bill Moyers talks with the survey pioneer recently named one of the 20th century's ten most influential people in the area of public policy. From his vast experience in the field, Yankelovich explains the agendas behind public opinion research, homing in on its uses and abuses by special interest groups. He also discusses the integral link between the economy and education, as well as what Americans can do to become poll savvy.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

Now With Bill Moyers [electronic resource]: John Nichols and Robert McChesney on the Media and Democracy

In this program, media experts John Nichols and Robert McChesney join Bill Moyers to examine America's corporate media machine and the dire implications of closed-door deregulatory decisions. Nichols, Washington correspondent for The Nation, and McChesney, author of Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times, discuss, among other topics, the pernicious influence of corporate interests on the free press, which they contend have become a major barrier to the exercise of democracy.
Online
2005; 2003
16.

War Spin [electronic resource]: Media and Iraq War

Some stories are simply too good to be true. In this program, John Kampfner, political editor for the New Statesman (London), skewers heroic reports of the ambush, capture, and rescue of Private Jessica Lynch, calling them misrepresentations designed to bolster wavering support for the Iraq War. Kampfner also scrutinizes the controversial practice of embedding members of the news media in military units and questions the sincerity and overall informational value of the daily CentCom briefings in Doha. An ideal springboard for discussions about propaganda, media ethics, and journalism in the modern combat zone.
Online
2005; 2003
17.

Self-Esteem and Identity in the Digital Age [electronic resource]

The development of authentic self-esteem and a healthy sense of self has always been a vitally important part of growing up. But this process is a challenge that has gotten even trickier to negotiate due to the widespread integration of digital technology into everyday living. Drawing on the insights of a clinical psychologist/family therapist, an adolescent psychologist, and a number of students, this program introduces the dynamics of child/adolescent psychology with a special emphasis on technology-related pitfalls associated with growing up in the Digital Age-particularly body image issues aggravated by the media and antisocial behaviors resulting from too much time spent online.
Online
2009; 2007
18.

Freedom of Expression Must Include the License to Offend [electronic resource]: Debate

As valued as it is, the principle of free speech through which everyone can have their say is an especially slippery slope as populations grow more pluralistic and the desire to get along creates pressure to curtail any expression that may potentially insult some portion of the people. Must freedom of expression include the license to offend? That is the question in this Oxford Union-style debate as panelists make their case. Speakers for the motion bring up the pernicious effects of censorship, the suppression of healthy debate, and repressiveness that can lead to authoritarianism, while those against speak of freedom of speech as a means to an end rooted in a particular place and time rather than as an ideal and stress the value to society of outlawing expression such as child porn [...]
Online
2009; 2006
19.

Voices of Dissent [electronic resource]: Freedom of Speech and Human Rights in China

Although China's government has pledged to revise its policies toward political dissidents, that promise remains largely unfulfilled. This program reveals egregious cases of political oppression occurring in recent years, countering the picture China painted of itself as it promoted the Beijing Olympics. Pushing back against bureaucracy and official stonewalling, the program examines the work of activist Hu Jia, his arrest and jail sentence, and the constant police harassment faced by his wife and lawyers. Numerous other cases are profiled while government apologists also appear - including China's Olympics Media Director and the head of Beijing's Deng Xiaoping Thought Research Center.
Online
2009; 2008
20.

That's News to Me [electronic resource]: Transformation of Journalism in a Wired Society

What constitutes news in the Digital Age, and who is most qualified to report it? This program takes an insightful look at the growing marginalization of the mainstream press in the face of the digital communication revolution through the eyes of journalists, bloggers, scholars, and the twentysomethings who are driving the consumption and production of news. The merits and liabilities of citizen journalism are weighed, and concerns such as whether Big Media has lost its objectivity or blogging is inherently narcissistic are considered. A blend of skepticism and enthusiasm, That's News to Me makes one point upon which everyone agrees: journalism is fundamentally changing-but will it be for better or worse?
Online
2009; 2008