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1.

Cooperation Beats Competition [electronic resource]

Survival of the fittest is a phrase coined by economist Herbert Spencer and often used to imply that competition, not consensus, is the fundamental means of survival. But an age-old spiritual concept-that placing the common good ahead of self-interest will enhance both-has been getting new attention. In this program, Hazel Henderson and ethical investing leader Terry Mollner assert that even in the financial realm, cooperation can outperform competition. Mollner uses the example of Occupy Wall Street to illustrate ways that new economic paradigms can be created, and tells the story of how he convinced Unilever to allow Ben & Jerry's to retain its social mission after being bought out.
Online
2012
2.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Taming Capitalism Run Wild

Even as President Obama's talking points champion the middle class and condemn how our economy caters to the very rich, the truth behind modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage - as suggested by the president - faces opposition from those who apparently pledge allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Some, however, aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back. In this edition of Moyers & Company, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shed light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake and discusses how to battle for economic justice. Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan.
Online
2013
3.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: What Has Capitalism Done for Us Lately?

In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill is joined by economist Richard Wolff - author of Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism - who dives into the topic of income inequality, analyzing the widening gap between a booming stock market and a population that increasingly lives in poverty. Wolff then takes questions sent in from around the world by viewers. Also on the show is Sheila Bair, the longtime Republican who served as FDIC chair during the fiscal meltdown five years ago. Bair joins Bill to talk about American banks' continuing risky and manipulative practices, their seeming immunity from prosecution, and growing anger from Congress and the public. Bair is the author of Bull by the Horns: Fighting to Save Main Street from Wall Street and Wall Street from Itself.
Online
2013
4.

Daring to Care-Prosperously! [electronic resource]

Socially responsible investing may seem like a good idea philosophically, but is it profitable? In this program banker Susan Davis talks with Hazel Henderson about KINS, a successful financial networking strategy based on generosity, win-win deals, conscious capitalism, and creating a greener economy. Davis, founder of the Capital Missions Company, explains how she proved to asset managers that triple-bottom-line portfolios could meet traditional financial benchmarks, even for institutional investors. Davis also discusses her book The Trojan Horse of Love, which details her journey from old-school finance professional to pioneer in ethical investing.
Online
2012
5.

The Politics of Money [electronic resource]

Christopher Lindstrom wants to reestablish the connection between communities and currency, with money standing as a symbol of trust between individuals rather than as a note of debt to a huge, abstract, and potentially harmful system. Cofounder of the Fund for Complementary Currencies, Lindstrom helped create the BerkShare, a money designed to support local and environmentally sustainable development. In this program, Lindstrom and Hazel Henderson examine misconceptions about how finance is structured, and describe efforts to place economic power back into the hands of the people using electronic barter, Internet crowd-funding, and the ideas of the Slow Money Institute.
Online
2012
6.

When Bubbles Burst [electronic resource]: Why Financial Markets Crash

The Norwegian hamlet of Vik was nearly bankrupted in 2007 due to speculative investing in U.S. hedge funds. Why has it become so difficult for communities, companies, and individuals to protect themselves from financial volatility? This program looks at the inner workings of the global economy, examining the mechanics behind unanticipated bubbles and catastrophic crashes. Experts including best-selling author Michael Lewis (The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine) and economics Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz give an unflinching account of the contemporary financial landscape, and Vik's unwitting involvement in the Terra Securities scandal serves as a case study.
Online
2012
7.

Chinese Capital [electronic resource]: Good or Bad Influence in Greece?

NewsHour's business and economics correspondent Paul Solman examines the pros and cons of a massive infusion of Chinese capital into Greece.
Online
2010
8.

The Federal Reserve Launches Aggressive Stimulus Program [electronic resource]

Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke announced the Fed's third attempt to stimulate the economy by buying up mortgage-backed securities and bonds and keep borrowing rates low. NewsHour correspondent Judy Woodruff talks to David Wessel, economics editor for The Wall Street Journal, to understand why the Fed chose this course of action.
Online
2012
9.

Zeitgeist [electronic resource]: Moving Forward - the Economic Hit Man

This program details the central inherent flaws of the monetary market system of economic conduct-and how this system is destroying us and the planet in a very direct way. A part of Zeitgeist: The Series.
Online
2010
10.

The Future of Socially Responsible Investing [electronic resource]

The popularity of ethical investing has grown over the past few decades, but when financial advisor Amy Domini started out in the industry, there wasn't much information about it available. Noting that most of her clients had lines they wouldn't cross, such as putting money into tobacco companies, she helped create the Domini 400 Social Index and wrote Socially Responsible Investing: Making a Difference and Making Money. In this program, Domini shares her insights about the future of socially responsible investing with Hazel Henderson, touching on quality management, the Occupy Wall Street and Tea Party movements, how the U.S. stacks up against Brazil and China, and more.
Online
2012
11.

Bypassing Wall Street [electronic resource]

Asset manager Katherine Collins had a successful career with Fidelity when she decided to pursue a degree from Harvard Divinity School. Now the CEO of Honeybee Capital, she believes it is possible to combine ethics with financial trading, and that bypassing Wall Street in favor of Main Street is one way to do it. In this program, Collins and Hazel Henderson explore socially responsible investments, touching on deregulation, high-frequency trading, and the fact that more and more retail investors are swearing off publicly-traded companies. Also discussed: the Darwin Project, which is based on the premise that human progress is due to cooperation, not competition.
Online
2012
12.

Transition to a Global Green Economy [electronic resource]

Generating jobs at three times the rate of the conventional sector, green investments have been a boon not just to the health of the planet but to that of the economy. In this program Alisa Gravitz, co-founder of the ethical consumerism group Green America, speaks with Hazel Henderson about environmentally sustainable economic models. Gravitz warns of a bursting "climate bubble" along the lines of the tech and housing bubbles-especially if the U.S. continues to rely on a fossil fuel-based mono economy-and also describes Green America's "break up with your mega-bank" campaign, its Green Business Network, and the Green Pages, all aimed at promoting small, socially-conscious businesses.
Online
2012
13.

Should Banks Be Public Utilities? [electronic resource]

Given the terrible malfunctioning of too-big-to-fail banks and the ineffectual bail-outs, should banking be made a public good like the electric power system? In this program Leland Lerhman, managing partner of Fund Balance, and Hazel Henderson examine the need to correct financial models that are now harming both humans and the planet. Lerhman believes that steering toward the tenets of social credit will ultimately benefit the economy while promoting human and ecological values. Among the topics raised: Ellen Brown's The Web of Debt, the concept of guaranteed income, and the development from negative screens to more sophisticated ways of linking financial systems to ecosystems.
Online
2012
14.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Why Banks Are Still Too Big to Fail

In this edition of Moyers & Company, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson tells Bill that five years after the country's economic near-collapse, banks are still too big to fail, too big to manage, and too big to trust. Stockholders' reaffirmation of Jamie Dimon as JPMorgan Chase's chairman and CEO-despite a year of accusations and investigations at the bank-is further evidence, she says, of an unchecked system that continues to covet profits and eschew accountability, putting our economy and democracy at risk. Morgenson also discusses how behemoth companies like Apple manipulate the system and avail themselves of the biggest tax loopholes money and influence can buy.
Online
2013
15.

Plunder [electronic resource]: The Crime of Our Time

In this eye-opening documentary, investigative journalist Danny Schechter traces the connection between corporate wrongdoing, the 2007 housing market crash, and the economic catastrophe that followed the crash. From the mysterious collapse of Bear Stearns, an 85-year-old investment firm that went under in a week, to the shadowy world of trillion-dollar hedge funds, Schechter argues that criminal activity on the part of major financial institutions led to massive foreclosures and contributed to economic devastation worldwide. Interviewing industry insiders, bankers, economists, and journalists, including convicted white-collar criminal Sam Antar and Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, Schechter also examines the media's complicity in not warning the public, and the failure of [...]
Online
2010
16.

Taming the Global Casino [electronic resource]

High-frequency computerized trading, in which 60% of trades are based on algorithms, has turned the marketplace into a worldwide casino. Funded by taxpayers, this use of public goods does not always benefit the public - especially when it's pension funds that are being gambled. In this program Hazel Henderson talks with Benjamin Bingham, CEO of 3Sisters Sustainable Management, about ways to reform global capital markets. Topics include negative screens, the financial transactions tax, hedge funds, naked credit default swaps, and the need for both positive-impact financial consultants and increased consumer awareness about triple-bottom-line investing.
Online
2012
17.

Reforming Housing, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac [electronic resource]

Were Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages responsible for bursting the housing bubble? When they were introduced, these products allowed more people to become homeowners, but ended up putting bankers in a scramble to back the loans while still pleasing their shareholders. In this program, Hazel Henderson and New Economy Network's Sarah Stranahan explain that it was private market speculation-not Fannie, Freddie, or the Community Reinvestment Act-that caused the 2007 subprime mortgage industry collapse. Both believe that the housing market can be revived by adopting policies pioneered during the New Deal, and making Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac public utilities.
Online
2012
18.

Made in Germany [electronic resource]: Europe's Economic Superstar

It's almost miraculous: a few scant decades ago, what is now the world's fourth-largest economy was brutally split in two. Today, all of Europe looks to Germany for answers. This documentary examines the nation's economic, social, and cultural power-how it developed at the dawn of the 21st century and how it will continue to shape the EU and the world. Factors for viewers to consider include a national focus on work and industry that values family businesses, solid professional training, and lifetime employment within the same company; environmental policies that emphasize sustainable, efficient energy sources such as solar and wind, enabling even small towns and villages to profit; and an ongoing faith in economic pillars such as Volkswagen, whose Glass Factory in Dresden serves as [...]
Online
2012
19.

Teaching Tools for Macroeconomics, Government, and International Trade [electronic resource]

Do the rich get a break at tax time - or do they pay more than their share? Who benefits and who suffers when sweatshops are allowed to operate? Are gas prices as outrageous as everyone thinks? This compilation of ABC News stories features 20/20 anchor John Stossel, who uses real-world situations to address provocative macroeconomic questions. In his characteristic straightforward style, Stossel covers topics such as income disparity, inflation, taxation, layoffs, government spending, offshoring, eminent domain, public vs. private enterprise, and much more.
Online
2006
20.

In Debt We Trust [electronic resource]: America Before the Bubble Burst

In this classic program, produced two years before the financial collapse of 2008, investigative journalist Danny Schechter predicts a 1929-like stock market crash due to the large amount of personal debt carried by so many Americans, and the fact that the nation's money supply is controlled by so few. Schechter outlines the specific factors he believes will lead to economic catastrophe: predatory credit card companies that target vulnerable customers such as students, the poor, and returning war veterans; exorbitant interest rates, especially on homeowners' loans; and banking industry lobbyists who succeeded in making it harder for ordinary people to obtain bankruptcy protection. The documentary stands as a fascinating exploration of manipulative lending practices filmed at a time w [...]
Online
2006