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1.

The Blue Planet [electronic resource]

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Presents new revelations about the oceans, the last unexplored frontier on earth, from space by scientists aboard the space shuttle and by scientists diving to the depths of the middle ocean to examine rare life forms. Covers cycles of weather, aquatic weather, the Gulf Stream, concentrations of plankton and coral reefs. Introduces technological innovations that are used in studying the ocean and its creatures.
Online
1986
2.

Fate of the Earth [electronic resource]

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Explores the delicate balance of the Earth's ecology and humankind's capacity for the destruction of life. Looks at the natural forces that created the universe from the ocean's depths to the distant boundaries of the solar system. Features interviews with scientists, biologists, and ecologists who study the biology of life and discuss the newfound concern for the preservation of the planet. Examines the environmental and human impact on the Earth's ecology, including the greenhouse effect, pollution, dwindling rain forests, and the possibility of nuclear warfare.
Online
1986
3.

Genetics and Aging

Dean Hamer, Director of the Gene Structure and Regulation Unit at the National Cancer Institute, talks about the link between genetics and aging. Dr. Hamer focuses on some of the more serious problems associated with age, in particular, Alzheimer's Disease.
Online
2015; 2011
4.

Future Frontiers

In the culmination of this 600-mile scientific expedition aboard the Alucia, Liz Bonnin and the team of scientific experts journey south to visit the oldest islands in the Galapágos to see first-hand the impact that humans have had on this pristine wilderness. Back on the larger island of Isabela, Liz descends into a spectacular vertical lava cave. Deep inside, she discovers how this hidden world could even provide an answer to how it might be possible to inhabit other planets. On her last land-based stop, on Santa Cruz, Liz comes face to face with the effects of man as she explores the misty scalesia forests. She also checks on a giant tortoise population, whose ancient migration pathways have come under threat from the largest human population on the archipelago. Finally, Liz dives [...]
Online
2017
5.

Suicide and Psychiatric Disorders

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison talks about the irrefutable link between psychiatric disorders and suicide, especially among young people.
Online
2015; 2011
6.

Acid Rain: Sources and Impact

Scientist and climate change expert Michael Oppenheimer discusses the causes and impact of acid rain. Oppenheimer states that the primary sources of acid rain are emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from electric power plants. The secondary source is nitrogen oxide emissions from automobiles. When acid rain falls in lakes and streams, it often changes the existing biology and, in some cases, virtually wipes out whatever life had been present.
Online
2015; 2011
7.

Are You What Your Mother Ate? The Agouti Mouse Study

Jirtle and Waterland’s Agouti Mouse research has been called one of the most important study’s of the 21st century. It is hugely significant for our understanding of both the epigenetic mechanisms that change gene expression and the relationship between Nature and Nurture in psychology and sociology. The film combines original interview and laboratory footage of Professor Jirtle to both tell the story of the Agouti Mouse Study and consider its implications for our understanding of the relationship between genes and the environment.
Online
2018
8.

TEDTalks: Edsel Salvaña—The Dangerous Evolution of Hiv

Think we're winning the battle against HIV? Maybe not, as the next wave of drug-resistant viruses arrives. In an eye-opening talk, TED Fellow Edsel Salvana describes the aggressive HIV subtype AE that's currently plaguing his home of the Philippines—and warns us about what might become a global epidemic.
Online
2018
9.

Five Years Later, Scientists Still Puzzled by Honeybee Decline (7/28/11)

Five years ago, honeybees began dying in large numbers and hives were becoming defunct. Spencer Michels reports on the scientists who are still trying to figure out why this is happening and what can be done to help the problem.
Online
2017; 2011
10.

Gene Therapy (Part Two)

Professor of Law and Medicine Alex Capron talks about the danger in assuming that if we know an individual's genetic blueprint, we know the individual. He reminds us that, as important as genetic structure may be, ultimately the individual is the product of the interaction between that blueprint and the world. He also talks about the topic of genetic manipulation, questioning where do we stop, and how far do we go in, "...adding greater capabilities, making a person perform at the highest human level or even going beyond that?"
Online
2015; 2011
11.

Better Wine Through Chemistry

The single most important step to making a good wine is fermentation, which is what gives wine its particular taste and alcohol content. Winemakers add yeast—a single-celled fungus—to grape juice, and if all goes well the yeasts rapidly multiply, crowding out other microbes and allowing fermentation to complete in two to three weeks. But sometimes, the yeasts get stuck and don’t fully ferment—a problem that has plagued the wine industry for centuries. Now a team of geneticists and biotechnologists have discovered what triggers "stuck" fermentation, and are bringing winemakers one step closer to perfecting the winemaking process.
Online
2015
12.

Manic Depressive Experiences in College and Beyond

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison talks about the episodes of mania and depression she experienced in college, then recalls her years in graduate school as a time of relative stability. All that changed when she began teaching at UCLA. "When I joined the faculty at UCLA in the psychiatry department as a young assistant professor, I went flamingly manic, " Dr. Jamison says. "Hallucinations, delusions...completely psychotic."
Online
2015; 2011
13.

TEDTalks: Simone Bianco and Tom Zimmerman—The Wonderful World of Life in a Drop of Water

Hold your breath, says inventor Tom Zimmerman. "This is the world without plankton." These tiny organisms produce two-thirds of our planet's oxygen—without them, life as we know it wouldn't exist. In this talk and tech demo, Zimmerman and cell engineer Simone Bianco hook up a 3D microscope to a drop of water and take you scuba diving with plankton. Learn more about these mesmerizing creatures and get inspired to protect them against ongoing threats from climate change.
Online
2018
14.

Defendant 5

Young Australian filmmaker Heidi Lee Douglas goes to Tasmania to make a documentary about the destruction of the island’s ancient forests. As anti-logging protests escalate, logging giant Gunns Ltd. reacts to public pressure by suing Heidi and 19 others for $6.4 million for allegedly conspiring to destroy the company’s business. When Heidi discovers Gunns wants to use her footage as evidence to support its claims, she faces a crisis of conscience. Heidi’s response is to turn the camera on herself to document her personal struggle as she goes into battle against a corporation out of control.
Online
2017; 2014
15.

Exuberance and Intellectual Curiosity

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison talks about the link between exuberance and curiosity. ". . . One of the endearing qualities of exuberance," Dr. Jamison notes, ". . . is that people are able to entertain themselves almost endlessly by asking questions."
Online
2015; 2011
16.

Extinction in Progress

The poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, Haiti is still struggling to get on its feet from the disastrous 2010 earthquake. But the real problem Haiti faces in the near future is the complete degradation of its natural resources. Today, forests cover less than two percent of its territory and scientists predict a mass extinction of Haiti’s biodiversity. Over a three-year period, a team of scientists and naturalists travel to the most remote locations in Haiti to investigate the current state of its biodiversity. Surprisingly, they discover almost 50 new species and rediscover species thought to be lost, including one of the most endangered mammals, the Hispaniolan solenodon.
Online
2017; 2013
17.

Surviving Earth

Surviving Earth is an independent Australian documentary featuring insight from Professor Tim Flannery, Ian Dunlop, Professor Paul Ehrlich, permaculturalist David Holmgren, Aboriginal elder Uncle Bob Randall, Professor Ian Lowe, Major-General Michael Jeffery (retired), and Bindi Irwin. Topics include resource depletion, climate change adaptation/mitigation and overpopulation.
Online
2017; 2014
18.

In Utero Treatment

Dr. Ed McCabe, Chief of the Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA, talks about progress that's been made in treating disorders in utero, including heart failure and neural tube defects.
Online
2015; 2011
19.

Life in Tropical Regions

The tropics is one of the most stunning regions on the planet. Given the diversity of the tropics’ climate and habitat, life has adapted quite uniquely. Explore the tropics and tropical savannahs, and find out where they are located. Learn about the equatorial jungles and their temperatures, their rainfall, and the plant and animal life found in them.
Online
2018; 2013
20.

Darwin's Dangerous Idea

Philosopher Daniel Dennett discusses the impact of Charles Darwin on not only modern views of biological evolution and nature, but on the evolution of thought and ideas, culture and science. According to Professor Dennett, all design processes have got to be founded in Darwinian mechanisms which are themselves, "....mindless, mechanistic, brute force algorithms."
Online
2015; 2011