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1.

A Child's Christmas [electronic resource]

In this animated version of Dylan Thomas' classic children's book A Child's Christmas in Wales, a young boy asks an elderly man what Christmas was like when he was a boy. The old man's answer draws us in to a fantastical, colorful, and unexpected world, where mermaids swam in Swansea Bay, wolves roamed the hills and valleys, and hippos trudged through the snowy town. This classic tale of the romantic nature of times gone by will enchant children and families.
Online
2008
2.

Little Women: Episode 1

This dramatization of Louisa May Alcott's novel is about the lives of the four March sisters. With their father fighting in the American Civil War, Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth are at home with Aunt March and their mother, a very outspoken woman for her time. The story reveals how the sisters learn to navigate love, loss, and the trials of growing up. In episode one, the women prepare for Christmas and look forward to attending a ball.
Online
2017; 1970
3.

Great Expectations: Episode 2

Pip starts his new life as a gentleman in London, quickly acquiring expensive tastes, and mounting debts. He falls deeper in love with Estella and escorts her around town. As his twenty first birthday approaches, Pip waits for his benefactor and their intentions to be revealed.
Online
2017; 2011
4.

Jewish Nationalism

In the sixth part of an eight part lecture series on “Daniel Deronda,” Professor Ruth Wisse discusses George Eliot’s inspiration for writing a novel in support of Jewish nationalism decades before Theodor Herzl wrote The Jewish State. An expert on Yiddish and Jewish literature and winner of the National Humanities Medal, Wisse draws parallels between Eliot’s relationship to her mentor, Emmanuel Deutsch, and Daniel’s relationship to Mordecai Ezra. She analyzes arguments against Mordecai’s vision from within the Jewish community, and examines Mordecai’s “embryonic Zionist” speech in Chapter 42 that also speaks to 19th century English society.
Online
2017
5.

Summer Day's Dream

Adaptation of J. B. Priestley’s play set in a post-apocalyptic future. A world government is in place and an old man’s peaceful existence in the country is threatened.
Online
2017; 1994
6.

Bill Moyers Journal: Robert Bly and Grace Lee Boggs

The poetry of Robert Bly explores startling truths at the heart of American culture and spirituality. Bill Moyers talks with the celebrated author about his life in letters—during which Bly has produced more than thirty books, including the National Book Award winner The Light Around the Body, in addition to cofounding American Writers Against the Vietnam War in 1966. Bly also discusses his 1990 work Iron John: A Book About Men—an international best-seller which has been translated into several languages. In a subsequent segment, the program features another evocative conversation with civil rights activist Grace Lee Boggs. Broadcast date: August 31, 2007. (58 minutes)
Online
2016; 2007
7.

Julius Caesar (Feature Film)

This star-studded 1970 feature film production of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar was the first full-color adaptation of the play. It tells the famous story of Caesar's assassination and the subsequent struggle between his friend and protege Marc Antony and the anti-Caesar conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius. Charlton Heston stars as Marc Antony, as he did in a previous 1950 film. Jason Robards's understated performance as Brutus proved controversial. Other performances were widely praised, including John Gielgud as Caesar, Richard Chamberlain as Octavius, Diana Riggs as Portia, and Richard Johnson as Cassius. Directed by Stuart Burge.
Online
2018; 1973
8.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood: Episode 1

Opium addict and choirmaster John Jasper has vivid dreams of killing his beloved nephew Edwin Drood and stealing his fiancée Rosa. When two exotic strangers arrive in town Jasper's dark desires take shape and his life will never be the same again.
Online
2017; 2012
9.

The Line of Beauty: The Love Chord

Andrew Davies' adaptation of Alan Hollinghurst's Booker Prize-winning novel set in London in the 1980s. It's 1983 and Oxford graduate Nick Guest is adopted by the rich, privileged family of Tory MP Gerald Fedden. Nick is drawn into the seductive world of the Feddens and finds his feet in London's gay scene, embarking on a secret love affair with a black council worker, Leo Charles.
Online
2017; 2006
10.

The Pickwick Papers: Episode 1

A twelve-part BBC Adaptation of Charles Dickens' first novel. In this episode, Mr. Samuel Pickwick and his gang begin their travels through England visiting coaching inns. Starring Nigel Stock, Clive Swift, Alan Parnaby, and Jeremy Nicholas.
Online
2017; 1985
11.

Jonathan Swift and Gulliver’s Travels

With politics, religion, invention and the monarchy numbering amongst his targets, Jonathan Swift created a masterpiece that is a scathing satire on human nature. Visiting strange nations such as Lilliput and Brobdingnag, the program presents a fascinating study of the man, his life and works and the enduring effect he still has today as one of the world's foremost giants of literature.
Online
2017; 2010
12.

The Pickwick Papers: Episode 2

A twelve-part BBC Adaptation of Charles Dickens' first novel. In this episode, due to a case of mistaken identity Mr. Winkle has been challenged to a duel. Starring Nigel Stock, Clive Swift, Alan Parnaby, and Jeremy Nicholas.
Online
2017; 1985
13.

The Bridge of San Luis Rey

This 1944 drama, based on Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel, tells the story of a group of people who die in the collapse of an Inca rope bridge in Peru. Starring Lynn Bari, Francis Lederer, Akim Tamiroff, Alla Nazimova and Louis Calhern. Directed by Rowland V. Lee. The musical score by Dimitri Tiomkin was nominated for an Academy Award.
Online
2018; 1944
14.

E. L. Doctorow: The Uncomfortable Truth

For over five decades the FBI kept intelligence files on dozens of American writers. Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Pearl Buck, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Norman Mailer, and many others had come under suspicion of subversion, espionage, or immorality. Yet not one was ever convicted of a crime. In this program with Bill Moyers, novelist E. L. Doctorow, author of Ragtime and the Book of Daniel, comments that the best writers are a nuisance to society because, he says, they prefer the uncomfortable truth to the comfortable lie. Never reluctant to address the controversial issues, Doctorow has searched for meaning in modern American history, mingling reality and myth to reveal hidden corners of the American experience. (30 minutes)
Online
2016; 1988
15.

The Knight From Olmedo

In this video, actors and directors work to re-create the style of the Spanish Golden Age in Lope de Vega's play The Knight From Olmedo.
Online
2017; 1989
16.

Aspects of the Classic Greek Theater

This video presents director Dimitros Rondiris' interpretation of Sophocles' play Electra using the classical style.
Online
2017; 1960
17.

Beyond Words

Perhaps responsible for the success of the human species, the power of language is remarkable. Yet a description of love, or a storm at sea, is not the same as the experience. Might language not describe reality at all? Is meaning a human fantasy of unlimited power and risk, or does it tell us how it really is? The Panel Professor Emma Borg joins anthropologist and linguist Daniel Everett and Closure theorist Hilary Lawson to confornt the limits of language. Hannah Dawson hosts.
Online
2017; 2015
18.

Lost Love

On this episode of Madame Bovary, Rodolphe Boulanger and Emma Bovary decide to run away together. After he ends the relationship the night before, Emma falls deathly ill. While Charles Bovary is attempting to cheer up his wife with a trip to the opera, the couple discovers Leon Dupuis has relocated to Rouen. Tom Conti and Francesca Annis star in this adaptation of Gustave Flaubert's debut novel.
Online
2017; 1975
19.

Robert Winston

In this film the leading scientist, medical doctor and broadcaster Professor Robert Winston explores six incredible Treasures of the British Library. He is helped and guided by the Library’s expert curators, discovering amazing facts and quirky details about each book, manuscript or object. Above all he and we enjoy the privilege of spending time with a truly unique and historic document or object. Each item taps into a different aspect of Robert’s life, career and interests. They cover subjects as diverse as skiing and theater directing, ranging from a much-loved colleague’s pioneering lab notes to a rough notebook handwritten by Beethoven. Through the six Treasures Robert gains a glimpse of the sheer scale and breadth of the British Library collection, before ending the film with h [...]
Online
2018; 2016
20.

The Mysterious Stranger

A dramatization of Mark Twain's novel about a young Missouri print shop apprentice who daydreams himself back to an Austrian castle in the Middle Ages, where a mysterious stranger, No. 44, brings magic, mischief, and adventure into his life.
Online
2017; 2002