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21.

Manlio G. Brosio

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"Participants: Manlio G. Brosio, Italian Ambassador to the United States, interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Francis W. Carpenter. Topics: Assessment of Italian Communist Party, strength of neofascists in Italian politics, Italian-Yugoslav relations and United States-Italian relations, trade agreements, and need for effective economic planning to erase social inequalities in Italian society."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, March 18, 1955 (200LW535).
Online
1955
22.

Walter H. Judd

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"Participants: Representative Walter H. Judd (R-MN), House Foreign Affairs Committee, interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Louis Banks. Topics: U.S.-China relations, the strategic importance of Formosa, opposition to U.N. recognition of the People's Republic of China, and assessment of the "domino" theory of the communist threat to Southeast Asia."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, July 26, 1954 (200LW637).
Online
1954
23.

Paul Henri Spaak

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"Participants: Paul Henri Spaak, Belgian Minister of Foreign Affairs, interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Francis W. Carpenter. Topics: Defeat of the European Defense Community, rearmament of Germany, communist situation in Europe, and effect of recent American elections on Europe."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, November 5, 1954 (200LW501).
Online
1954
24.

Patricia Hornsby-Smythe

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Participants: Patricia Hornsby-Smythe, Member of the British Parliament and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Walter Cronkite. Topics: The British National Health Service Program and rearmament of Germany."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, October 12, 1953 (200LW562).
Online
1953
25.

James P. Richards

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"Participants: Representative James P. Richards (D-SC) interviewed by Larry Lesueur and Bill Downs. Topics: Need for cooperation between the legislative and the executive branches of government in foreign affairs; foreign aid funds; U.S. foreign policy objectives in the Far East; and impressions received from visits to Formosa, Indochina, and India."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, January 7, 1955 (200LW511).
Online
1955
26.

Mohammed Ali

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"Participants: Mohammed Ali, Pakistani Ambassador to the United States, interviewed by William Bradford Huie and Donald I. Rogers. Topics: Pakistan-Kashmir issue, American capital investments and trade between Pakistan and the United States, People's Republic of China, the Soviet Union, and India."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, April 23, 1952 (200LW82).
Online
1952
27.

W. Averell Harriman

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"Participants: W. Averell Harriman, former Director of the Mutual Security Agency, interviewed by William Bradford Huie and Hardy Burt. Topics: Interpretation of the current Soviet peace initiatives and evaluation of the Eisenhower administration."--Longines Chronoscope Interviews, May 25, 1953 (200LW436).
Online
1953
28.

School of Assassins [electronic resource]

This Academy Award-winning documentary looks at a United States institution that trains Latin American military officers. Few Americans have heard of the school-the U.S. Army School of the Americas-nor are they aware that some of its graduates have gone on to become dictators and violators of human rights in their home countries. The program contrasts the mission statement of the school with the actions of its graduates, among whom are former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, numerous other strongmen throughout Central and South America, and a large number of lower-level officers who have been charged with the murders of thousands of civilians, including North American missionaries.
Online
2005; 1994
29.

One Day of War [electronic resource]

This shocking and highly innovative documentary reveals the scale and effects of war on the modern world: people fight for their land, their religion, their ideas, and sometimes, solely their survival. Following combatants in 16 wars over the same 24-hour time period, the program tells the stories of a range of fighters-from child soldiers to women commandos and UN peacekeepers to army conscripts-in conflicts from Burma to Sudan, Laos to Cambodia, cutting between characters as the day unfolds. This is a continuing drama about individuals: their reasons for fighting, their hopes for the future, and the fear, excitement, and often banality of life in a war zone.
Online
2006; 2004
30.

First Steps [electronic resource]: Worldwide Response to the Landmine Crisis

Emmylou Harris narrates this in-depth program, which describes the growing international effort to eliminate the widespread menace of landmines. Examining the work of international agencies and humanitarian groups, the program documents mine-removal initiatives in three heavily affected nations: Angola, Albania, and Azerbaijan. With the cooperation of dedicated mine-clearance units, the process is explained from inception to completion, chronicling the training of de-mining troops, the deployment of supporting technologies, and the implementation of the mine-riddance process throughout the host country.
Online
2006; 2004
31.

Malawi [electronic resource]: Nation Going Hungry

Poverty, unstable government, and disadvantages in trade have virtually eliminated food security in Malawi. This program explores the African country's struggles on both a personal and national level, interviewing frustrated civil servants and impoverished citizens, and reflecting widespread despair over WTO policies and the government's inability to subsidize the agriculture of its own people. Highlighting the additional problems of environmental degradation and AIDS, the program offers a moving glimpse into human lives that revolve around one constant challenge: getting something to eat.
Online
2006; 2004
32.

India [electronic resource]: Working to End Child Labor

This program examines India's immense child labor problem and the fight against it. The video contrasts this nation's status as the world's largest democracy with the fact that, inside its borders, 80 million children work physically exhausting jobs for minuscule wages. Incorporating interviews with Shanta Sinha, founder of the organization known as MVF, the video illustrates how the group coordinates community action against the exploitation of young people and creates bridge schools that help children with the transition from work to education. It also makes a strong case that child labor increases poverty levels.
Online
2006; 2004
33.

Tell Me Cuba [electronic resource]

Beginning with a summary of Cuban history from the island's 16th-century subjugation by Spanish conquistadors to the 20th-century communist revolution, this program scrutinizes the current state of U.S./Cuba relations through the eyes of progressives, who want to put the past behind them for the benefit of Cubans still suffering from the decades-long U.S. embargo, and the anti-Castro expatriate community, which sees normalization of relations as a victory for despotism and a repudiation of their deeply held convictions. The political standoff between America and its communist neighbor has consistently defied remediation, and filmmaker Megan Williams does not pretend there is a universally acceptable solution. "Williams takes a complex and divisive subject and captures it with a clear [...]
Online
2010; 2006
34.

Words and Actions [electronic resource]: Contexts and Consequences of Propaganda-From the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Sandwiched between the fictional countries of Northland and Southland lies Midrain Province. Drawing upon a hypothetical situation involving mounting tensions between the Southlanders and the Midrainians, this seminar, moderated by NYU Professor Arthur Miller and filmed on location at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, explores the role of propaganda in situations where genocide is threatened and examines how the use of propaganda during the Holocaust era informs public reaction to its dissemination today. Compelling questions spark a crackling discussion with echoes of Rwanda, Bosnia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo as positions that seem clear in the abstract quickly become muddied by the reality of lives hanging in the balance. Panelists include Princeton Univer [...]
Online
2010; 2008
35.

The Future of Food [electronic resource]: A Looming Crisis

According to Tim Lang, Professor of Food Policy at London's City University, future wars may be fought specifically over agricultural resources. Given the present volatility of food prices and the riots they provoked in 2008, his theory seems to be on the mark. This program assesses the potential for a global food crisis as it guides viewers through issues involving climate change, oil consumption, biofuel development, fish stock depletion, and other topics. A Rift Valley herder discusses drought in Africa; a Cuban scholar details the impact of the Soviet collapse on food transportation in his country; an Indian farmer reports being pressured into planting jatropha instead of food crops; and Senegalese fishermen lament the intrusion of Western corporate interests. A Blakeway Televisi [...]
Online
2010; 2009
36.

Global Conflict [electronic resource]

This program-a valuable tool for introducing the concepts of energy security, antiterrorism, and managing change at the global level-identifies the roots of violent conflict by way of specific examples. Through discussion of territorial conflicts (India/Pakistan, Israel/PLO), genocides (Rwanda, Srebrenica), terrorism (al Qaeda, IRA, ETA), and hybridized violence such as that found in Sudan, Global Conflict makes the case that an understanding of the sources of conflict, combined with the free exchange of information internationally, is the key to reducing strife at all levels.
Online
2010; 2009
37.

Consequences of Conflict [electronic resource]

The consequences of armed conflict are complex and long-lasting. Using Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan as points of departure, this program examines some of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of conflicts at the national and international levels. Topics include the pernicious phenomenon of child soldiers; the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons; thorny issues related to aid money and international assistance; the enduring scars of war on the landscape; the repercussions of ruined infrastructural elements such as power grids; and the unquantifiable losses-the what-could-have-beens-that inevitably occur when a nation's money is diverted from education and health care.
Online
2010; 2009
38.

Arab and Jew [electronic resource]: Return to the Promised Land

In this video, author David K. Shipler returns to Israel to revisit the issues of his Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land. In that book, Shipler explored fundamental conflicts and tensions dividing Israel in 1988. In this program, Shipler returns to visit Israeli Jews and Palestinian Arabs from that documentary and re-examines the deeply symbolic and difficult emotional issues, among them the right of return, the holy city of Jerusalem, and the West Bank Jewish settlements.
Online
2001
39.

Reforming the World Bank [electronic resource]

The World Bank was founded in 1944 mainly as a way to help Europe rebuild after the Second World War, and it has since become the premiere agency for aiding developing countries. But critics began to say that the World Bank's rigid economic formulas failed to take into account the societal differences of those it served, that its projects were ecologically harmful, and that despite aid, billions of people were still lacking access to food, clean water, and education-but were now in debt to more powerful nations. The World Bank expanded its mandate to address these concerns, but has there been measurable change? In this program Hazel Henderson discusses the World Bank's focus on the noneconomic aspects of development with former IMF chief economist Kenneth Rogoff; Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, [...]
Online
2005
40.

Visions of a Brighter Future [electronic resource]

Hazel Henderson believes the old models for development are changing, going beyond GDP and GNP to broader indicators of wealth based on peace and human rights. According to Henderson, the rise of nonprofits, NGOs, and volunteer workers has challenged old-fashioned corporate mentalities, and the concept of socially responsible investing is gaining momentum. Is an era of environmental sustainability, respect for social concerns, and global cooperation now possible? In this program Henderson and a panel of economists share their views on what lies ahead for the human family, touching on the UN's Millennium Development Goals and the vision of the Darwin Group-who submit that Charles Darwin spent more time addressing "the human genius for altruism and cooperation" than he did on survival [...]
Online
2005