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1.

Arab and Jew [electronic resource]: Return to the Promised Land

In this video, author David K. Shipler returns to Israel to revisit the issues of his Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land. In that book, Shipler explored fundamental conflicts and tensions dividing Israel in 1988. In this program, Shipler returns to visit Israeli Jews and Palestinian Arabs from that documentary and re-examines the deeply symbolic and difficult emotional issues, among them the right of return, the holy city of Jerusalem, and the West Bank Jewish settlements.
Online
2001
2.

The Turkish Perspective [electronic resource]: Should Turkey Be Admitted to the European Union?

Why has the prospect of Turkish membership in the European Union enflamed such passions? Since the time of the Crusades, Europe has regarded Turkey with wary suspicion, and even today some question whether a staunchly Muslim country can be safely absorbed into the E.U. From the legacy of Ataturk to the threat of Islamic fundamentalism, this thought-provoking look at contemporary Turkey and its possible E.U. admission provides a snapshot of a nation in transit. Various viewpoints are provided by journalist Tuncay Akgun, Jean-François Perouse (Institute for Anatolian Studies), Armenian representative Luiz Bakar, and MEP Daniel Cohn-Bendit, who argues that Turkey's E.U. membership would combat terrorism by proving that "the clash of cultures between the Muslim world and Western societie [...]
Online
2005
3.

Rabbis in Palestine [electronic resource]: Clerics Work to Improve Israeli-Palestinian Relations

Arik Ascherman and Jeremy Milgrom are not typical Israeli rabbis. As this documentary shows, every day they leave their homes in Jerusalem to help Palestinians in the West Bank. They believe Jews, as God's chosen people, have an obligation to challenge the injustices of occupation. But few other Israelis agree. In addition to confronting angry settlers, the rabbis must overcome the prejudices of most Palestinians. Can clerics, of all people, really help to resolve a conflict that is seen for the most part as rooted in religion? Through their actions and beliefs, the rabbis are challenging widespread prejudices. As Ascherman states: "We give Palestinians hope that there are other kinds of Israelis they can talk to, come to agree with, and have peace with.
Online
2006
4.

The Grand War of Civilizations [electronic resource]

For decades, Iraq was Saddam Hussein's sadistic stomping ground. Then it became George W. Bush's ideological battlefield. The pivot point was 9/11 and a perceived link between Saddam and al Qaeda, bringing calls for an invasion from top American and Western leaders. This program examines the consequences of that hasty decision-making process: misadventure on a grand scale, according to many observers, and an extremist backlash that engulfed Iraq in bloodshed. Viewers meet retired Major General James Marks, senior intelligence officer for coalition land forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom, and gain insight as to why the occupation and counter-insurgency faced so many problems. Events in both Fallujah and Baghdad are studied. Numerous accounts from victims of sectarian violence, ques [...]
Online
2011
5.

Gaza [electronic resource]: The Killing Zone

Israel's hard-line policy may be aimed only at Palestinian militants, but very often it's innocent civilians who end up literally caught in the cross fire. This documentary reports on the violence in the Occupied Territories, focusing on the plight of children who are constantly threatened by Israeli snipers, military rockets, and army bulldozers. The film also presents the stories of Rachel Corrie, an American student crushed by a bulldozer as she tried to protect Palestinian homes; photographer Tom Hurndall, who was shot while rescuing a child from gunfire; and cameraman James Miller, killed by Israeli fire despite being unarmed and carrying a white flag.
Online
2003
6.

Iraq [electronic resource]: The Making of an Army

At FOB Endurance in Iraq, American army instructors are training Iraqi security forces to defend their own country. With the insurgency raging outside the base, Sgt. Alvarez has only four weeks to turn a group of men into soldiers, but the time-honored method of yelling and swearing is less effective when recruits don't understand English. With exceptional levels of access and unexpected moments of levity, this documentary chronicles the creation of an Iraqi combat force, focusing on the experience of one young Iraqi given the all-American nickname of "Hamburger.
Online
2005
7.

Hate in the Holy Land [electronic resource]

Aghiat Ahras was just 18 when she strapped on an explosive belt and detonated it in a crowded Israeli supermarket. Her mother understands why Aghiat wanted to die, saying that "Death is the only way out for us." Abigail Levi's 17-year-old daughter was in that supermarket; Levi's grief is exacerbated by the fact that her daughter's killer is venerated as a heroine - and that her daughter had sympathy for the Palestinian cause. This documentary travels to the ghettoes of Palestine to meet with members of the Al Aqsa Martyr's Brigade - a coalition of West Bank militias known for training suicide bombers - speaking with Palestine's disillusioned youth and with Israelis who blame Ariel Sharon for making a difficult situation even worse for everyone involved.
Online
2003
8.

A New Muslim World? [electronic resource]

Osama bin Laden's death in 2011 was clearly a milestone in America's war on terror, but for those who study dramatic shifts in the West's relationship with the Islamic world, no event can compare with the Arab Spring. What does the wave of regime-toppling revolution and democratization that began in Tunisia in 2010 mean for the future of the Middle East and for international relations in general? This program searches for answers as it shows how the Arab Spring took root and expanded into the multifaceted movement that continues even today. It also shows how terrorist networks, hate-driven organizations, and hawkish governments still foment violent face-offs with their avowed adversaries, even as greater openness and individual freedoms appear across the Arab-speaking world. Developm [...]
Online
2011
9.

Bogged Down [electronic resource]

Terrorism. Extremism. Religious and sectarian violence. Should we study political and socioeconomic patterns in order to understand why these tragedies occur? Or are they far simpler than that? Are they ultimately about hate and nothing more? Traveling to three focal points of conflict, this program explores 21st-century manifestations of an age-old human problem - the need to destroy others who appear inferior, unworthy, or unholy - and how that flaw in the social psyche shapes today's clash of civilizations. Starting with U.S. President Barack Obama's 2009 Cairo speech as a reference point of moderation, the film spans the globe as it explores an entire spectrum of hate-driven behavior - from the Taliban's brutal repression of anything deemed un-Islamic (such as CD shops and kite f [...]
Online
2011
10.

Falling Towers [electronic resource]

Why 19 hijackers turned themselves into lethal weapons on September 11, 2001, will probably never be fully understood. But can we form a rough image of their mind-set? Can we glimpse the skewed worldview that led them to terrorism, and what will that tell us about American and global reactions that came in the wake of 9/11? This program pursues those questions as it gathers insight about the attacks and their aftermath. A conversation with Andrew Card - chief of staff under George W. Bush and the official who first informed the president of the World Trade Center strikes - segues to an interview with a former Guantanamo Bay prison guard, followed by further discussion of the changes in American foreign and domestic policy wrought by the war on terror. The film also examines the reper [...]
Online
2011
11.

War on the Home Front [electronic resource]

After 9/11, America's stated mission was to "bring the fight to the terrorists." Iraq and Afghanistan became, in essence, two battlefields in the West's war on terror. But what happens when terror rises from the very soil that foreign wars are waged to protect? Are European countries in particular overlooking the need to fight a different kind of fight, one in which the hearts and minds of their own citizens are at stake? This program looks at developments in England and Belgium (the correspondent's native country) in an effort to understand how radicalism can take root after being imported from extremist hotbeds in Pakistan and other Islamic countries. Viewers meet worshippers from mosques where the London subway bombers of 2005 were radicalized, two Brussels detectives who broke up [...]
Online
2011
12.

Palestine Kids [electronic resource]

What's it like growing up in a war zone? Dodging bullets, hiding from Israeli soldiers, and losing their land to settlers is part of ordinary life for Palestinian children. Five-year-old Diana lives in a cave in the West Bank since violence forced her family from their home. Mufida, 16, is struggling to complete her education with Israeli soldiers living on her roof. And Yassin, 7, just wants to move to Brazil. Through their stories and others, this film reveals the daily struggle of Palestinian children to survive, both physically and psychologically. "I want to live in peace," says Mufida, who must pass through a hail of settlers' stones every day on her way to school, "but then I see what the Israelis do, and I hate them.
Online
2007
13.

Iraq [electronic resource]: Private Armies

When the Iraqi government threatened to expel all foreign mercenaries following the controversial Blackwater Baghdad shootings of 2007, the role of private military contractors was thrust into the spotlight. There's no denying that the use of hired security forces is transforming the way we wage war. The contractors earn four times more than regular soldiers, act with impunity, and in Iraq, outnumber all non-U.S. soldiers combined. This program follows the training and deployment of these combatants in Iraq to provide an eye-opening look at life as a private soldier, while exploring some of the issues surrounding their use. "With private contractors, America is able to stay in Iraq for much longer and without as much political fallout," explains one proponent. But a recruit puts it m [...]
Online
2007
14.

Iraq [electronic resource]: Chemical Ali

Ali Hassan Al Majeed - the notorious "Chemical Ali" - was a political appointee responsible for Iraq's Kurdistan region when he boasted that he would "take two-thirds of the Kurds and hit them with chemicals until they die." Using mass killings, deportations, and chemical weapons, Chemical Ali crushed insurrections among minority rebels and Shia dissidents on a scale so devastating that it came to be known as the Kurdish Genocide. Coupling eyewitness accounts with survivors' testimonies and rare archival footage, this documentary from Kurdish filmmaker Kawa Akrawi provides a definitive account of Chemical Ali's reign of terror.
Online
2006
15.

Back Door Channels [electronic resource]: The Price of Peace - Egypt and Israel in 1979

Filmed in Israel, Egypt, Morocco, Austria, France, and the U.S., this documentary examines one of the most difficult diplomatic achievements of the 20th century: the 1979 Camp David Peace Accord and Treaty between Egypt and Israel. Viewers learn the inside story of the agreement, for which U.S. President Jimmy Carter (who is interviewed in the film), Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, and Egyptian President Anwar El-Sadat served as the public architects. As the film illustrates, brilliant strategic minds were also at work behind the scenes, including former U.S. National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, former Egyptian Foreign Minister (and UN Secretary General) Boutros Boutros-Ghali, former Carter advisor Leon Charney, and numerous other key players who describe their exper [...]
Online
2011; 2013
16.

The Media and Democracy in the Arab World [electronic resource]

This program goes behind the scenes at Al Jazeera, "the CNN of Arabia. Dedicated to freedom of speech, Al Jazeera has earned the admiration of the West and the ire of the Arab nations-with the exception of Qatar, where the independent news agency is based. Interviews, clips of the highly controversial and extremely popular debate show The Opposite Direction, and reportage covering the first democratic election in Qatar, the role of women in Iranian politics, jihad in Afghanistan, U.S./British air strikes on Iraq, and the war in Kosovo demonstrate Al Jazeera's commitment to boldly present "the other opinion.
Online
2005; 1999
17.

The Curse of Oil [electronic resource]

This program offers a global history of the oil industry and the issues intertwined with it, from early-20th-century prospecting in South America and the Middle East to war in Iraq. The origins and significance of OPEC figure prominently in the narrative, as do several historic and violent conflicts revolving around controlling sources or flows of oil: labor strikes in Latin America, Nasser's seizure of the Suez Canal, the Iran-Iraq war, and other pivotal events. Revealing interviews feature, among others, former OPEC leader Sheikh Ahmed Yamani and former U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia James Akins-who minces no words and calls oil a curse.
Online
2006; 2003
18.

Francis Fukuyama [electronic resource]: End of History?

Best known as the author of The End of History and the Last Man, Francis Fukuyama is a former neoconservative who argued for the overthrow of Saddam Hussein-then changed his mind before the 2003 invasion of Iraq. What caused his reversal? If the war had gone differently, would he have revised his opinion again? What strategies does he envision for promoting global democracy in the future? Fukuyama addresses those and other questions in this detailed, one-on-one interview. Topics include foreign policy differences between the U.S. and the European Union, China's unusual ability to create modern capitalism without representative democracy, and Fukuyama's concept of a "global NATO.
Online
2009; 2008
19.

Hamas [electronic resource]: Untold Story

Produced with unprecedented access to Hamas and its operations, this program takes viewers inside Gaza's Islamic fundamentalist government in the months following its civil war against Fatah. The film observes Hamas leaders as they struggle to shape policy and follows a former militant who now heads up an Executive Force police unit-carrying out orders he doesn't agree with. Archival footage and interviews from earlier years are also included, creating a historical context in which the emergence of Hamas, as well as the problems of governance it now faces, can be examined and discussed. Fatah's ongoing control over Hamas finances is one of the many topics analyzed.
Online
2009; 2008
20.

Disengagement [electronic resource]: Israel's Unilateral Withdrawal

Israel's national unity was severely tested with the 2005 evacuation of settlers from the Gaza Strip and West Bank. This program tells the story of that watershed event through multiple perspectives and opinions. Opening with a historical overview of Israel's settlement policy, the program features compelling scenes from anti-disengagement demonstrations, the Gush Katif evacuation, Hamas rallies, Knesset sessions, and Palestinian Authority meetings. Interviews with key political players-including Israeli President Shimon Peres, former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and a number of Palestinian leaders-highlight the impact of Israel's unilateral move on the power structures that have dominated the conflict.
Online
2008; 2007