You searched for:

Subject
:
International Relations
x
Subject
:
Human Geography
x
13 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Malawi [electronic resource]: Nation Going Hungry

Poverty, unstable government, and disadvantages in trade have virtually eliminated food security in Malawi. This program explores the African country's struggles on both a personal and national level, interviewing frustrated civil servants and impoverished citizens, and reflecting widespread despair over WTO policies and the government's inability to subsidize the agriculture of its own people. Highlighting the additional problems of environmental degradation and AIDS, the program offers a moving glimpse into human lives that revolve around one constant challenge: getting something to eat.
Online
2006; 2004
2.

India [electronic resource]: Working to End Child Labor

This program examines India's immense child labor problem and the fight against it. The video contrasts this nation's status as the world's largest democracy with the fact that, inside its borders, 80 million children work physically exhausting jobs for minuscule wages. Incorporating interviews with Shanta Sinha, founder of the organization known as MVF, the video illustrates how the group coordinates community action against the exploitation of young people and creates bridge schools that help children with the transition from work to education. It also makes a strong case that child labor increases poverty levels.
Online
2006; 2004
3.

Global Conflict [electronic resource]

This program-a valuable tool for introducing the concepts of energy security, antiterrorism, and managing change at the global level-identifies the roots of violent conflict by way of specific examples. Through discussion of territorial conflicts (India/Pakistan, Israel/PLO), genocides (Rwanda, Srebrenica), terrorism (al Qaeda, IRA, ETA), and hybridized violence such as that found in Sudan, Global Conflict makes the case that an understanding of the sources of conflict, combined with the free exchange of information internationally, is the key to reducing strife at all levels.
Online
2010; 2009
4.

Consequences of Conflict [electronic resource]

The consequences of armed conflict are complex and long-lasting. Using Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan as points of departure, this program examines some of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of conflicts at the national and international levels. Topics include the pernicious phenomenon of child soldiers; the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons; thorny issues related to aid money and international assistance; the enduring scars of war on the landscape; the repercussions of ruined infrastructural elements such as power grids; and the unquantifiable losses-the what-could-have-beens-that inevitably occur when a nation's money is diverted from education and health care.
Online
2010; 2009
5.

Haiti [electronic resource]: Where Did the Money Go?

After a 7.0 earthquake brutalized Haiti in January of 2010, Americans donated a stunning
Online
2011
6.

Explaining Globalization [electronic resource]

City planning that puts people before cars, sculptural museums that are as artistic as the masterpieces they contain, commercial spaces that redefine retail - these are some of the paradigm-shaking ideas of today's architects at work. This compilation of recent NewsHour segments introduces viewers to Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Daniel Libeskind, Vincent Scully, and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, visionaries in the world of architecture. Episodes include... * Frank Gehry on the Guggenheim Bilbao: Elizabeth Farnsworth talks with architect Frank Gehry about the process of designing and building the Guggenheim Bilbao. Segment also sold as a part of Pritzker Prize-Winning Architects. * Vincent Scully and the New Urbanism: Ray Suarez and architectural historian Vincent Scully discuss the reth [...]
Online
2008; 2006
7.

Food for All [electronic resource]: Global Agriculture and the Developing World

Satisfying one's hunger is a primal act which most Westerners never connect to global issues. But the diets and farming systems of wealthy countries can be directly linked to starvation in the underdeveloped world. This program sheds light on the international tragedy of hunger and malnutrition, emphasizing that the problem is one of distribution, not production. Filmed in Asia, South America, and sub-Saharan Africa, the film shows how geopolitics, economic isolation, regional conflicts, and lack of infrastructure render poor countries unable to feed their own people. Biotechnology, land use priorities, government corruption, the fast food industry, and the vicious cycle of child hunger are all featured topics. Contains scenes of breastfeeding.
Online
2008; 2007
8.

Walls

It has been more than 50 years since the first stone of the Berlin Wall was laid in 1961—later to be torn down—but today the world is still inexorably crossed by walls, both visible and invisible. Walls that divide and exacerbate differences, walls that feed ethnic and religious hatred, walls that raise barriers between races and skin colors...walls that create conflicts all over the world. But in this painful yet hopeful story of dialogue amidst conflict, it is important to increase awareness that, perhaps, the walls within us are the most difficult to break down. The documentary Walls, shot mainly around the border between Nogales, Arizona, U.S.A., and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, shows the border that divides the United States from Mexico. Along the almost 2,000-mile border between th [...]
Online
2018; 2012
9.

10 Homes That Changed America

10 Homes that Changed America highlights ten architecturally adventuresome dwellings, which provided Americans with more than just a “roof over their heads”—these homes elevated living to an art form. Meet the talented architects who brought these buildings to life, along with their often-eccentric clients, and the lucky individuals who live in these historic homes today. A primer in domestic architecture, 10 Homes will also offer a lesson in the history of American domestic life, as the evolving design of these homes over time reveals America’s changing relationship with nature, technology, and each other.
Online
2017; 2016
10.

Nicaragua [electronic resource]: Turning Away From Violence

In Nicaragua, a growing awareness of domestic violence and its consequences has spurred grassroots activism. This program documents the efforts of two groups, the Xochitl-Acatl Center and the Association of Men Against Violence, both of which confront gender and sexual abuse. Arguing that economic and political oppression influence male tendencies to exercise physical authority within the home, the video describes educational campaigns that build financial self-sufficiency and self-esteem in both men and women. Interviews with participants feature more than one success story.
Online
2006; 2004
11.

Guatemala [electronic resource]: Human Price of Coffee

Coffee is second only to oil as the world's most valuable traded commodity, but small-scale producers rarely profit from it. This program reveals the hardship and uncertainty faced by coffee farmers in Guatemala, and how many are taking steps to obtain better prices and build better lives. Analyzing the country's traumatic history and the lingering effects of its civil war, the video sheds light on the reluctance of some citizens to organize for fear of persecution and murder. The video clearly demonstrates that behind every pound of coffee lies a story of human struggle.
Online
2006; 2004
12.

Don't Call Australia Home

Australia is detaining, cuffing, and deporting more New Zealanders than any other group. Guest reporter Peter FitzSimons finds it's riling Kiwis and straining relations across the Ditch. Is this how they treat an old mate?
Online
2019; 2018
13.

Power and Influence

How China's Communist Party is infiltrating Australia.
Online
2019; 2017