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1.

Making the World Safe for Democracy [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

As the United States reshaped Manifest Destiny for use in the 20th century, the concept came to be equated not with conquest and expansion, but with the spread of American values and institutions. Focusing on World War I and the Russian Revolution, the section "A New World Order" traces the deflected trajectory of President Wilson's idealistic plan to export democracy - a plan that ended in compromises and broken dreams. "Containment," which begins with World War II, examines the spread of communism in Asia and U.S. opposition to it via the Kennan policy of containment and the Truman Doctrine. And "Quagmire" discusses how the Kennedy and Johnson administrations felt duty-bound to escalate American political and military involvement in Vietnam as a part of an ideological proxy war bet [...]
Online
2010
2.

Uspomene 677 [electronic resource]: Determining Bosnia's Future

Six hundred and seventy-seven concentration camps were established during the Bosnian war. The way the victims and the perpetrators within each community deal with this dark legacy will determine the country's future. From a grim outlook to a fragile optimism, this film tells the whole story. It shares the viewpoint of each ethnic group (the Serbs, Bosnians, and Croats) and shows how a new generation is coming to terms with its toxic past. Living in a Bosnia fighting for EU membership, they're desperate to find a way to live together. A haunting profile of a 20-year legacy.
Online
2012
3.

Monsters to Destroy [electronic resource]: Manifest Destiny

With the collapse of the U.S.S.R., suddenly the U.S. was the sole superpower - a militaristic global leader with no clear enemy or foreign policy goal. The section "New World Disorder" illustrates the unprecedented turbulence of the fractured post - Cold War world during the George H. W. Bush administration: the Tiananmen Square protests, the U.S. invasion of Panama, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War, ethnic cleansing in the Balkans and Rwanda, and famine in Somalia. "Indispensable Nation" analyzes President Clinton's inability to create a demilitarized Manifest Destiny based solely on trade and economic growth. And "Smarter Than History" uses pivotal events from the George W. Bush presidency - the 9/11 attacks and the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq - to examine the compro [...]
Online
2011
4.

Conflict in the Modern World [electronic resource]: The Origins of World War I and World War II

This program looks at the world prior to World War I, the rise of Hitler, and the tensions leading to World War II to shed light on how major international conflicts begin. Students are provided with a historical outline of the powers of this time, the countries and key people involved, and an unfolding of events as they happened around the world.
Online
2008; 2013
5.

Dicing With Debt [electronic resource]: Ireland's 30-Billion-Euro Nightmare

If you want a quick, brutal lesson on Europe's debt crisis, just ask an Irish property developer. Better yet, take a stroll along the banks of Dublin's Liffey River, where new office buildings and prime waterfront real estate have plummeted in value. Meanwhile, unemployment soars across the nation, especially among Ireland's young people. How did it happen, and did Ireland get a raw deal in comparison with other European Union countries also facing debt crises? This program assesses the Irish government's acumen in taking on private-sector bank debt and becoming liable for billions of euros owed to bondholders. Was it fair that Ireland agreed to do so when holders of Greek government debt have been asked to take losses? As one Irish protest organizer puts it, the deal is "extortion" [...]
Online
2012
6.

Reunion [electronic resource]: Dialog and Reconciliation in Kosovo

Shortly before the NATO bombing of Kosovo in 1999, young Serbs and Albanians sat down together with one bold, improbable goal: creating a constructive cross-cultural dialog. Produced ten years later, this follow-up documentary features the participants meeting once again-an encounter in which traumatic stories are shared, grievances and sympathies are exchanged, and the roles of victim and oppressor become difficult to assign. The expertise of the Nansen Dialog Network, a Norway-based organization that helps disparate groups explore reconciliation and conflict-resolution strategies, plays a significant role in the meetings and the film.
Online
2011
7.

Sarajevo Diaries [electronic resource]

At the beginning of the siege of Sarajevo in April 1992, SaGA became a place of assembly of intellectuals, film professionals, artists and students, who, despite the war, stayed in Sarajevo to preserve their way of life. From the start of the war, SaGa's teams were shooting everyday life in the streets of Sarajevo. During the siege of Sarajevo, there were more than 60 documentaries made. This episode takes a look at some of the videos The New York Times has called "part news, part horror movie" as well as a video report on musicians gathering in Sarajevo to bring attention to the Bosnian crisis. Also featured are reports on Prague's neo-Nazi skinheads; environmental protection in Haiti and Brazil; the distribution of cameras to human rights activists; and on Kosovo.
Online
1993
8.

Sarajevo Part 1 [electronic resource]: Ground Zero

During the siege of Sarajevo, everyday life was not just challenging, it became deadly for far too many residents. Mass killings from mortar fire occurred while people stood in line for water, attended a football game, or shopped at the market. City streets became known as "Sniper Alleys." SaGA (Sarajevo Group for Artists) had film crews throughout the city to record life in a city under siege. This episode features highlights from the more than 60 documentaries that were made during the height of the horror. Director Ademir Kenoic offers a chilling look at what life was like during that time.
Online
1993
9.

Human Rights in Northern Ireland [electronic resource]

In 1921 the six counties of Northern Ireland were partitioned from the twenty-six counties of the south. A Protestant, unionist dominated parliament was established in 1922. Its policies in the areas of housing, employment, and voting rights, discriminated against the Catholic population. Subsequent protests and preemptively violent responses from the local security eventually led to the murder of thirteen demonstrators in the incident known as Bloody Sunday. This episode examines the continuing conflict and its social and economic impacts. Andrew Tyndall reports on why the media are more interested in the troubles of the British Royals than "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland. New York Times reporter John Burns also features an interview with Irish politician and activist Bernadette [...]
Online
1994
10.

Mama Illegal [electronic resource]: Undocumented in Western Europe

Putting their trust and safety in the hands of illicit traffickers, three mothers from a bleak Moldovan village make their way to Austria and Italy, where they find work as cleaners or care workers. This film depicts seven years in the lives of Raia, Aurica, and Natasa-vulnerable lives that are lived underground, without valid documents, without health care, without the comforting presence of loved ones. Diligent and careful, each woman sends what little remains of her hard-earned Western money home to her family. But there is an unexpected, paradoxical price to these plans for a brighter future: never fully "arriving" and gaining acceptance in the West, each worker finds, when her self-exile has ended, that she has become alienated from her own children and husband. The economic bar [...]
Online
2011
11.

Ethnic Fault Lines in Europe [electronic resource]: Voices of Human Rights

Since the fall of the Austro-Hungarian empire after World War I, Hungary has had to deal with fascist hate groups. Siding with the Axis powers during World War II legitimized the pogroms against the Roma and Jewish populations during that time. The collapse of the Hungarian communist system in the early 1990s, and the ensuing social and economic instability, has led to the rise of these groups yet again. This episode examines their actions against the Jews and Gypsies of Hungary. Philanthropist George Soros discusses his human rights work in Hungary and throughout Eastern Europe. Also featured are reports on anti-war activists in Belgrade, Serbia; medical relief for Cuba; human rights heroes being honored in Washington, D.C.; and excerpts from films shown at the Human Rights Watch Fi [...]
Online
1993
12.

Ethnic Fault Lines Revisited [electronic resource]

Although internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan, Nogorno-Karabakh is a de facto, but unrecognized, state in the South Caucasus. In February 1988, the parliament voted to secede from Azerbaijan and unite with Armenia, igniting armed conflict. Charges of ethnic cleansing have been leveled on both sides. This episode details the events and their impact on the population. Also included are reports on Cambodia, Guatemala, and a large Muslim enclave in Serbia that has been spared the horrors of ethnic cleansing - until now. Finally, a music video of Luis de la Guerra performing "El Costa de la Vida" is highlighted.
Online
1993
13.

The Media and Human Rights [electronic resource]

A drop in popularity of the Hungarian conservative political party Fidesz led to charges of liberal bias on the part of the media there. The media became a scapegoat for the defeat of the party in the 1994 parliamentary elections. This episode explores the lack of media independence in post-communist Hungary and the neo-conservative's attempt to control public television and radio. Andrew Tyndall reports on how the media covers itself. Also featured are reports on the growing number of journalists who are killed while on assignment and a profile of Belgrade's B-92, a radio station that mixes music with anti-war activism in Serbia's capital.
Online
1994
14.

Chechnya [electronic resource]

Sergei Kovalev was serving as Boris Yeltsin's human rights advisor when he publicly opposed Russia's military involvement in Chechnya. He cooperated with the rebels and urged Russian soldiers to give up. In this episode, he discusses the ongoing conflict along with Ludmilla Thorne of Freedom House. Also featured are a video diary from Tomas Goltz on the town of Samashki and its efforts to defend itself from the Russian army's assault, and an exclusive interview with Fred Cuny. The disaster relief specialist and human rights hero traveled to Chechnya in 1995 where he disappeared and is presumed dead.
Online
1996
15.

Safe Havens: Part 1 [electronic resource]

In April 1993, the United Nations declared the besieged enclave of Srebrenica a safe area under UN protection. In spite of its status the town was surrounded and fell to the Bosnian Serb army in July, 1995. What followed was the worst crime on European soil since World War II. Eight thousand people - mostly men and boys - were massacred, while women, children, and the elderly were forced to leave their homes and were sent to Tuzla. This episode examines the fall of the town and whether UN officials were complicit in the slaughter and displacement of thousands of innocent civilians.
Online
1996
16.

Safe Havens: Part 2 [electronic resource]

The horrors of Srebrenica are discussed in this episode. Interviews with former State Department ambassador-at-large, Robert Gallucci, and Newsday correspondent and Pulitzer Prize-winner, Roy Gutman on the lessons learned from these events?
Online
1996
17.

Yellow Wasps [electronic resource]: Anatomy of a War Crime

In this classic program Serbian journalist Jovan Dulovic investigates the 1992 ethnic cleansing of a Bosnian Muslim city by the Yellow Wasps, a Serbian paramilitary group, and the subsequent war-crimes tribunal that failed to hold the Yellow Wasps responsible. Survivors of the attack offer their recollections of what happened, while the Yellow Wasps' leader says that Muslim extremists provoked the Serbs' violent assaults against the Bosnians. The weak response of the international community to reports of Serbian-controlled concentration camps is also examined, with commentary from former UN Special envoy José Maria Mendiluce and others.
Online
1996
18.

The Troubles in Northern Ireland [electronic resource]

Offering viewers a political, historical, and religious framework in which to study and discuss, this program recounts the heartbreaking narrative of Northern Ireland's Troubles. It sheds light on the origins of the dispute, which date to before 1690, while focusing on tensions that surged to the breaking point in the 20th century. Why was it so difficult for various communities - Catholic, Protestant, Republican, and Unionist - to coexist? Why did their differences lead to such bitter violence and thousands of deaths? And why, finally, did these communities decide to search for a peaceful solution? Using interviews with scholars and veterans of the conflict, the film encourages viewers to assess political developments in Northern Ireland and whether or not they represent a secure an [...]
Online
2012
19.

Birth of Rock Music

U.S.A., the 1950s. A climate of racism pervades society —particularly in the South, where it is unthinkable that whites should listen to the same music as blacks. It is in this context that a new style of music appears. Afro-American rhythm and blues is adapted, and the result is rock ’n’ roll. However, for the moment, this music is mostly played by black artists for a black community. Then, in 1954, Elvis Presley walks through the door of the Sun Records studio. The young truck driver wants to give his mother a record as a present, so he records two songs, pays $4.00, and leaves with his record under his arm. Elvis Presley is spotted by the owner of Sun Records, enjoys a meteoric rise, and brings rock ’n’ roll to the wider, white American audience. After the United States, England g [...]
Online
2017; 2016
20.

100 Years, 100 Events: 1990's

Every decade has its share of important events. But in this completely engrossing series we bring you only the best, the most far-reaching, the most worldly, and the most consequential. You will see a unique clarity of history through the "most privy" in insider accounts and expert witnesses. Events include: Germany Reunification, The Gulf War, Communists Try To Grab Back Power In Moscow, The Horror In Bosnia, The Failure In Somalia, Nelson Mandela, Yitzhak Rabin, The Death Of Princess Diana, Bill Clinton & Monica Lewinsky, and 100 Years: A Retrospective.
Online
2019; 2010