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1.

Malawi [electronic resource]: Nation Going Hungry

Poverty, unstable government, and disadvantages in trade have virtually eliminated food security in Malawi. This program explores the African country's struggles on both a personal and national level, interviewing frustrated civil servants and impoverished citizens, and reflecting widespread despair over WTO policies and the government's inability to subsidize the agriculture of its own people. Highlighting the additional problems of environmental degradation and AIDS, the program offers a moving glimpse into human lives that revolve around one constant challenge: getting something to eat.
Online
2006; 2004
2.

India [electronic resource]: Working to End Child Labor

This program examines India's immense child labor problem and the fight against it. The video contrasts this nation's status as the world's largest democracy with the fact that, inside its borders, 80 million children work physically exhausting jobs for minuscule wages. Incorporating interviews with Shanta Sinha, founder of the organization known as MVF, the video illustrates how the group coordinates community action against the exploitation of young people and creates bridge schools that help children with the transition from work to education. It also makes a strong case that child labor increases poverty levels.
Online
2006; 2004
3.

The Road to Mandalay [electronic resource]: Assessing the Myanmar Reforms

Burma, also known as Myanmar, has long been closed to the scrutiny of journalists and camera crews, and its only real ally and investor has been neighboring China. But, following the dubious elections of 2010, things began to change. The government released dissenter Aung San Suu Kyi, suspended a dam project with China, freed thousands of prisoners, and signed peace pacts with a number of warring ethnic groups. This report on the country was produced with a previously unheard-of travel visa and a relatively liberal ability to film and interview without interference. Locations include the old colonial capital of Rangoon (now Yangon), the bizarre new North Korean-style capital Naypyidaw, the ancient temple town of Bagan, and the bustling commercial hub of Mandalay. Speaking with report [...]
Online
2012
4.

Sayonara Baby [electronic resource]: Japan's Legal Barriers to Parental Rights

Returning home to find her two children and her Japanese-born husband gone, Regan Haight soon discovered that Japanese law and custom were heavily stacked against her. But Haight's isn't the only case in which the Japanese legal system is on the side of a kidnapper spouse. Australian Chayne Inaba has long battled for access to his daughter, to no avail. Craig Morrey first saw his daughter fleetingly in a courtroom when she was six months old. And Alex Kahney was forced to return to Britain, leaving behind two little girls abducted by their Japanese mother. Japan has long resisted signing an international agreement laying out the rules for these cases, and although Japanese leaders have signaled that their position could change, the so-called left-behind parents still struggle to keep [...]
Online
2012
5.

Dicing With Debt [electronic resource]: Ireland's 30-Billion-Euro Nightmare

If you want a quick, brutal lesson on Europe's debt crisis, just ask an Irish property developer. Better yet, take a stroll along the banks of Dublin's Liffey River, where new office buildings and prime waterfront real estate have plummeted in value. Meanwhile, unemployment soars across the nation, especially among Ireland's young people. How did it happen, and did Ireland get a raw deal in comparison with other European Union countries also facing debt crises? This program assesses the Irish government's acumen in taking on private-sector bank debt and becoming liable for billions of euros owed to bondholders. Was it fair that Ireland agreed to do so when holders of Greek government debt have been asked to take losses? As one Irish protest organizer puts it, the deal is "extortion" [...]
Online
2012
6.

Lives for Sale [electronic resource]: Human Trafficking

Each year, more than one million people try to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, contending with dangerous forces that prey on their hopes and exploit their gullibility. This program exposes the most painful, disturbing, and hidden dimension of illegal immigration: the growing black market trade in human beings. Shedding light on the poverty that causes so many to risk everything by leaving their home countries, the film reconstructs the frightening journeys of sex-slavery victims and highlights the work of CAST-the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking. Border patrol agents and other members of law enforcement share their knowledge and experience regarding this ongoing human rights crisis.
Online
2008; 2006
7.

Helmut Kohl [electronic resource]: German Giant

A crystal-clear window into European politics during and following the Cold War, this program presents an intimate portrait of Helmut Kohl-Germany's longest-serving chancellor and the leader largely responsible for reuniting that country. Candidly discussing his extraordinary career, Kohl offers his perspective on many of his decisions, political alliances, and objectives as chancellor, as well as his painful family experiences. Additional on-screen commentary is provided by former President George H. W. Bush, former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev, and several German political experts and insiders-including Chancellor Angela Merkel and former MP Norbert Blum. Rarely seen archival footage is featured as well.
Online
2009; 2007
8.

Waves of Liberty [electronic resource]

In this program the author of Sparks of Liberty: An Insider's Memoir of Radio Liberty reviews the origins, struggles, and eventual demise of the American radio station that broadcast directly to the Soviet people starting with the Cold War. Funded by the CIA, Radio Liberty's stated mission was to provide objective information about culture and current events to those without a free press, like its sister stations Radio Free Europe and Voice of America. Former employees discuss working at Radio Liberty's Spanish location - where it was moved to avoid Soviet jamming of transmissions - its content, and the logistics of conveying information in the pre-Internet age.
Online
2007
9.

Human Trafficking [electronic resource]: Crisis for the EU and the World

Europe's wealth represents a golden opportunity for those who smuggle cheap, easily exploited workers across international borders. But how does the loathsome mechanism of human trafficking actually occur, and what are EU authorities doing to fight it? This program investigates by recording the experiences of human trafficking victims and evaluating the work of the EU government in the battle against 21st-century slavery. Corruption, prostitution, victim protection and repatriation, and the creation of FRONTEX-the agency responsible for European border patrol-are all highlighted, while members of the European Parliament and other officials discuss what must be done to improve anti-smuggling efforts.
Online
2007
10.

Stop the Flow [electronic resource]: Analyzing the Causes of EU Immigration

Can Western aid to the developing world help to stem the tide of foreign workers into the EU? This program reports on European initiatives intended to improve conditions in Africa and the Middle East and thus reduce the number of job-seekers entering the European Union. With a spotlight on human rights, fair trade, the global war on poverty, the role of the private sector, and the frustrations of young unemployed foreigners, the program uses Morocco as a specific case study and also outlines the significance of the Middle East peace process. Additional insight comes from activists and businesspeople in developing countries and from Louis Michel, EU Commissioner of Development and Humanitarian Aid.
Online
2007
11.

Venezuela [Sur]Realista [electronic resource]: The Republic of Hugo Chavez

In the eyes of his supporters, he has championed the rights of the poor and bravely defended his country's interests in the face of foreign aggression. Opponents have portrayed him as an embarrassing and dangerous megalomaniac, squandering the nation's oil wealth while bolstering his own power base. This indepth look at Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez explores his Bolivarian political philosophy, his adoption of "21st-century socialist" principles, and the challenges he has faced as a highly polarizing leader. Produced in anticipation of Chavez's bid for a fourth term in office, the film presents interviews with community leaders, political figures, intellectuals, and journalists, all of whom shed light on the complexities of life in Chavez's Venezuela - and the volatile atmosphere [...]
Online
2011
12.

UN Human Rights Conference Preview [electronic resource]

The World Conference on Human Rights was held by the United Nations in Vienna, Austria, in 1993. With representatives of 171 nations, and some 7,000 participants overall, it was largest gathering ever on human rights. The conference did have an expansive view of human rights, with the normal political and economic rights being explicitly augmented by women's rights, indigenous peoples' rights, minority rights, and more. This episode looks at the problems, priorities, and players at the conference. UN Secretary-General Boutros-Boutros Ghali, discusses the limitations, universality, the current status, and the future of the United Nations. Also featured are reports on Cambodia's move toward democracy; a human rights advocate becomes president in Guatemala; and families of murder victim [...]
Online
1993
13.

Vienna Conference on Human Rights [electronic resource]

The 1993 UN Vienna Conference on Human Rights included representatives from 171 nations. The key result of the conference was the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action which states: "The promotion and protection of human rights is a matter of priority for the international community, and that the Conference affords a unique opportunity to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the international human rights system and of the machinery for the protection of human rights, in order to enhance and thus promote a fuller observance of those rights, in a just and balanced manner." This episode features interviews with conference attendees, including John Shattuck, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights. Also featured are reports on Liberia, Egypt, Angola, and a musical salut [...]
Online
1993
14.

Ecuador [electronic resource]: Divided Over Oil

This program contrasts indigenous, community-based culture with market economics driven by multinational corporations. The film assesses the growing conflict between Burlington Resources, an American oil company licensed to prospect in regions of Ecuador, and the self-sufficient Achuar people of that country, who believe the oil industry will destroy their environment and non-materialistic way of life. Underscoring the Ecuadorian government's tendency to accommodate U.S. interests, the video portrays a country divided by incompatible definitions of wealth and happiness.
Online
2006; 2004
15.

Nicaragua [electronic resource]: Turning Away From Violence

In Nicaragua, a growing awareness of domestic violence and its consequences has spurred grassroots activism. This program documents the efforts of two groups, the Xochitl-Acatl Center and the Association of Men Against Violence, both of which confront gender and sexual abuse. Arguing that economic and political oppression influence male tendencies to exercise physical authority within the home, the video describes educational campaigns that build financial self-sufficiency and self-esteem in both men and women. Interviews with participants feature more than one success story.
Online
2006; 2004
16.

Guatemala [electronic resource]: Human Price of Coffee

Coffee is second only to oil as the world's most valuable traded commodity, but small-scale producers rarely profit from it. This program reveals the hardship and uncertainty faced by coffee farmers in Guatemala, and how many are taking steps to obtain better prices and build better lives. Analyzing the country's traumatic history and the lingering effects of its civil war, the video sheds light on the reluctance of some citizens to organize for fear of persecution and murder. The video clearly demonstrates that behind every pound of coffee lies a story of human struggle.
Online
2006; 2004