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1.

A Changing World [electronic resource]

According to some forecasts, the Arctic Ocean will be seasonally ice-free by the summer of 2013 - a nightmare that is driving environmentalists to find ways to minimize the damage. But for energy prospectors, climate change brings new opportunities as more and more deposits of oil, gas, and minerals become accessible. This program focuses on competing interests racing to control Arctic resources and territories. Dr. Ruth Jackson, from Nova Scotia's Bedford Institute of Oceanography, heads the team mapping the seabed in support of Canada's claims. As the work of Dr. Jackson and other researchers shows, scientists as well as nations must contend with the Arctic's icy politics. In one scene, a Canadian-led venture is thwarted when a deal to hire a Russian icebreaker falls through.
Online
2009
2.

An Uncertain Future [electronic resource]

There are two different Arctics. One is the storybook land of snow and polar bears, while the other has become a breeding ground of petroleum plants and pipelines. Can the two coexist? What fate awaits the natural Arctic if the technological one expands without restraint? This program explores those questions as it follows research taking place on Bylot Island, home to a portion of Sirmilik National Park, in Canada's Nunavut Territory. Here, scientists have come every summer for the past 20 years to measure the impact of climate change on snowy owls, lemmings, snow geese, and Arctic foxes. Here, they have discovered that even tiny, hardy plants are being affected, causing a cascade of changes through the ecosystem.
Online
2009
3.

The Arctic Passage [electronic resource]

Each year the number of ships traversing the Northwest Passage rises, raising concerns among local and indigenous communities. As this program illustrates, the trend shows no sign of stopping, since what were once extremely dangerous waters are becoming more and more accessible to global commerce. Ports such as Churchill, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, and Murmansk, near Russia's border with Norway and Finland, expect to see business and maritime activity grow for years to come. But with the increases in traffic come higher risks-in particular for the Inuit, who have called the Arctic home for thousands of years and are troubled by escalating threats to their traditional way of life.
Online
2009