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1.

Power Trip

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A comic clash of cultures that combusts when AES, an American energy company, tries to transform the dysfunctional electric system in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia.
DVD
2006
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

The Flaw: Markets, Money, Mortgages, and the Great American Meltdown

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Inspired by former U.S. Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan's acknowledgment that he'd found a flaw in his model of how the world worked, The flaw looks at the forces underlying the credit bubble that caused the financial crash which nearly destroyed the world economy.
DVD
2012; 2010
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Inside the Global Economy: With Nariman Behraveshi

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Discusses the trend towards increased international economic integration and economic interdependence. Includes case studies from around the world and panel discussions by economic experts.
VHS
1994
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Global Village or Global Pillage?

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Examines global industrialization and how people around the world are challenging it. Features Ralph Nadar, Charles Kernaghan, Thea Lee, Loretta Ross, Dennis Brutus. Based on the 1994 book of the same title.
VHS
1999
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Great Decisions 2001: 1-4

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Presents four U.S. foreign policy cases based on U.S. foreign policy issues analyzed in the Great decisions briefing book published annually by the Foreign Policy Association.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
6.

The Invisible Wall

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The Invisible Wall is a gripping exposé of the part played by multi-national corporations, Third World debt, and trade barriers in fueling poverty and environmental destruction in the world s poorest countries. It argues that, in the post-Cold War era, global rich-poor inequalities will occur on a grander scale than ever before. Noam Chomsky, Susan George and John Kenneth Galbraith are among the critics of GATT s new world order of unfettered market forces. Avoiding images of human suffering and concentrating instead on its root cause, the program evokes more anger than pity. It exposes the power inherent in food politics, such as that wielded by a single American company which alone controls almost half of the world s cereal production. It looks into a leaked World Bank document whi [...]
Online
1996
7.

Warren Lee Pierson

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Online
1953
8.

Global Capitalism and the Moral Imperative [electronic resource]

In the rising tide of the global economy, some boats are riding high, and some are being left high and dry. Moral leaders warn that global laissez-faire is producing consequences similar to those of the 19th century, when gaps between rich and poor kept thousands in abject poverty for generations. In this new era of social Darwinism, moral leaders are asking who in the world community will care for the needs of the poor, and how it will be accomplished. If economic and political reforms are necessary, as they were in the 19th century, we must determine who will initiate them, and how they will be enforced.
Online
2006; 1998
9.

Asian Values Devalued [electronic resource]

As the tiger economies of East Asia turned from boom to bust in the 1990s, the general public was amazed, yet many economists nodded their heads knowingly. This program focuses on the plights of Indonesia, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, where nepotism, cronyism, corruption, suppression, and the exploitation of cheap foreign labor brought about a financial crisis of enormous proportions. These regions grew too quickly without proper controls and economic safeguards, which has left the middle and lower classes, who are crushed by inflation and unemployment, to pay the bill. Experts agree that East Asia will survive, eventually recover, and probably surpass itself, but at a staggering cost in money and human misery. This program is an excellent expose that reveals why the bubble burst.
Online
2005; 1998
10.

Japan's Economy [electronic resource]: Bursting the Bubble

In this program, noted correspondent Paul Solman inquires into how Japan's star economy fizzled out-and why America deceived itself regarding Japan Inc. Seth Sulkin, President of Pacifica Corporation; Professor Yoshi Tsurumi; and investment banker Eugene Dattle present crony capitalism, flawed financial institutions, a dearth of skilled public regulation, and Yakuza involvement as factors that led to bursting Japan's economic bubble. But not all pundits repudiate their earlier opinions: Ezra Vogel, author of Japan as Number One, and MIT professor Paul Krugman defend their past assessments of Japan's economy.
Online
2006; 1999
11.

Economic Change [electronic resource]

Between the privatization of state-owned monopolies on the one hand and advances in information technology and e-commerce on the other, European economies are undergoing drastic changes to keep up with the times. Module one of this program focuses on institutional change, as the British electricity market undergoes privatization, while module two examines technological change through the case study of the German online bookstore ABC Bucherdienst, a part of Amazon.com.
Online
2006; 1999
12.

Economic Indicators [electronic resource]

How do countries evaluate the performance of their economic systems and national economies? In module one of this program, the Italian Statistical Office applies the U.S. concept of Gross Domestic Product, while in module two economists in Finland consider the GDP plus social indicators to gain a fuller economic picture. Module three illustrates how Hungary, a former communist bloc country, monitors its transition from a planned economy to a market economy through its own blend of statistics.
Online
2005; 1999
13.

Investment and Growth [electronic resource]

The investment/growth cycle relies on synergy between government and industry. Module one of this program features the UN's International Fund for Agricultural Development, which assists in the progress of low-developed countries around the world. Using Singapore's economic success as a model, modules two and three highlight two prerequisites for economic growth: political credibility derived from sound economic policy and investment in human capital.
Online
2006; 1999
14.

Competition and Market Regulation [electronic resource]

Antitrust laws, trade regulations, and property ownership work together to preserve the balance of rights among consumers, retailers, and employees. Module one of this program explains how citizens of Zurich voted to extend shopping hours, overturning an obsolete market intervention; module two examines fair competition in the case of Volkswagen/Audi v. The European Commission; and module three examines how Venice, in an absence of private property rights, is moving to restore its crumbling buildings.
Online
2005; 1999
15.

Financial Systems for Growth [electronic resource]

Economic growth requires a variety of financial institutions that can provide a steady stream of capital while managing risk. Traditional banking, as demonstrated in a rural Austrian village, is the focus of module one; module two concentrates on the trading of derivatives in the City of London; and module three explores venture capitalism through the case study of Novarox AG, a telecommunications software company with headquarters in Zurich and production facilities in St. Petersburg.
Online
2005; 1999
16.

How to Cope With Unemployment [electronic resource]

Where there is commerce, there is usually a degree of unemployment as well. Module one of this program presents an agency that develops the marketability of unemployed youth in Spain-victims of schooling/market mismatch and employer reluctance to provide training. Module two considers collective bargaining agreements in the Netherlands that have created employer incentives to hire out-of-work teens and young adults. Module three spotlights an innovative labor retooling initiative in Finland.
Online
2006; 1999
17.

International Trade [electronic resource]

Free trade is a vital source of economic growth, yet it is frequently endangered by the protectionist demands of special interest groups. Module one of this program uses the Hungarian clothing industry to illustrate the comparative advantages of international trade; module two goes inside the WTO, the only international body dealing with the rules of trade between nations; and module three seeks to understand strategic trade policy through the example of Airbus Industries.
Online
2005; 1999
18.

European Integration [electronic resource]

The E.U. is intent on developing a Europe without economic borders. Module one of this program outlines the potential of Europe's open labor markets while addressing the barriers imposed by language and culture. Module two examines the basic principles of the European Central Bank and the objectives of European monetary policy. Module three assesses both the economic gains to be had from European integration and the challenges of equitable political representation.
Online
2005; 1999
19.

An Introduction to the IMF [electronic resource]

The consensus of the world's leaders is that economic stability and cooperation offer the best hope for global peace. Using interviews with members of the International Monetary Fund's Board of Governors-each one the head of a national central bank or a minister of finance-this program explains how the IMF is structured and illustrates how it sets policy. The program also uses archival footage to examine the dual birth of the IMF and the World Bank and to explore the vision of its founding members: John Maynard Keynes and Harry Dexter White. IMF historian James Boughton provides additional insights.
Online
2005; 2000
20.

How the IMF Tracks Economies and Makes Loans [electronic resource]

In IMF parlance, what does "surveillance" mean? And how does the IMF decide who gets a loan? This program describes how the IMF monitors national economic policies for their impact on the Fund's 180-plus member nations and how loans are made to ailing or emerging economies. Topics under consideration include Article IV consultations and poverty- and debt-reduction initiatives. Former IMF Managing Director Michel Camdessus; Edwin Truman, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs; IMF economist David Goldsbrough; and IMF historian Jim Boughton are featured.
Online
2005; 2000