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Human Geography — Economic Aspects
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1.

China [electronic resource]: Dance Around Golden Calf

As China continues to experiment with Western-style economics, many city dwellers already enjoy the prerogatives of a market economy. But how will China feed itself as more and more farmers flee their land for the allure of urban living? This program seeks to understand the effects of economic reform on Chinese society, from the villages to the cities. Will cultural values and the traditional arts and sciences retain their importance as China makes its bid for first-world status, or will they and the rest of the old China be swept away by Western attitudes, a burgeoning middle-class, and the country's new identity as a nascent economic powerhouse?
Online
2006; 1997
2.

Water for the Fields [electronic resource]

No matter where on Earth, the one human activity that consumes the most water is the one that wastes the most: agriculture. From locations around the world, this program surveys both disasters of agricultural irrigation, such as cotton farming in Uzbekistan, and innovative successes in water-efficient techniques and crops, such as in California and India. Numerous examples illustrate the destructive effects of deforestation and overgrazing, the difficulty of fighting erosion and reclaiming arable soil, and the urgency of the motto: more crop per drop.
Online
2006; 2003
3.

Water for Profit [electronic resource]

The moment demand outpaces supply, water becomes a commodity to be traded in the global market. But who owns the rights to water? And how can a price be set on water? In this program, the pros and cons of privatization are assessed in a number of water management situations around the world: Aguas Argentina in Buenos Aires; the Bechtel corporation in Cochabamba, Bolivia; Thames Water company in Jakarta; and a public/private test partnership in Albania. Corporate representatives, anti-privatization activists, farmers, and industry experts offer commentary from all sides of the issue.
Online
2006; 2003
4.

Watery Visions [electronic resource]: Is the Future Potable?

In a dramatic reversal of policy since apartheid, South Africa has become a model of water fulfillment. Despite being one of the driest regions on Earth, India's Rajasthan is an oasis due to the revival of a system of ancient rain basins. This program looks at these encouraging examples to show how sustainable solutions to long-term water management can be achieved, while a visit to Sertao in Brazil illustrates the appalling alternative-two very different futures.
Online
2006; 2003
5.

Fair Trade, Fair Profit [electronic resource]: Making Green Enterprise Work

All over the world, green enterprise is growing. This program focuses on the catalyst that is transforming Earth-friendly businesses into paying ventures: a thing that economists call externalities. In Mexico, coffee growers use collective bargaining to create a more secure market. In Tanzania, where malaria is rampant, a mosquito net manufacturer makes good by marketing social change. In Brazil, babassu nut farmers preserve their traditional business by finding markets for their nut by-products. And in Uganda, impoverished entrepreneurs rebuild their community with startup money from a nontraditional venture capital fund called C3.
Online
2005; 2002
6.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009
7.

Niger [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of Noma

Noma is an acute oral infection that attacks young, malnourished children. If left untreated-which, tragically, is often the case in Africa-it devours bone tissue and permanently disfigures its victims. This unflinching program studies the impact of the pitiless disease and will help viewers assess the ability and readiness of the international community to combat the suffering. Graphic scenes of school-age noma patients are interwoven with commentary from medical experts and heartbreaking accounts from family members who have watched as sons, daughters, and grandchildren succumb to the sickness. The film also describes low-cost interventions that could keep noma from spreading, if resources are made available.
Online
2010; 2009
8.

Paraguay [electronic resource]: Soya and Pesticides

When an 11-year-old Paraguayan boy named Silvino Talavera died from pesticide poisoning in 2003, his name became a rallying cry in the fight against intensive soya production. This program recounts the tragedy and the legal, political, and economic impact of "agritoxins" in Latin America. Opening with a poetically filmed reenactment and moving on to feature key players in the story, the film includes an interview with Fernando Lugo-a Catholic priest whose election to Paraguay's presidency shifted policy away from large-scale agricultural interests toward more populist causes. Land redistribution and genetic modification emerge as central topics in this look at a controversy that is far from over.
Online
2010; 2009
9.

Chad [electronic resource]: Hydraulic Projects and Peace

Characterized as an LDC or Least Developed Country, the nation of Chad wrestles with drought, population growth, and resulting tensions between farmers and herders. This program investigates hydraulic projects and mediation initiatives that are fostering relationships between Chad's food growers and its nomadic, livestock-centered cultures. Overviewing the basic causes of Chadian land disputes and competition for water sources as well as failed modernization schemes proposed during the 1960s, the film explores new solutions based on recognizing traditional agriculture and natural migration routes. Viewers witness "sit-down" talks between farmers and herders that could help prevent regional conflicts from flaring up.
Online
2010; 2009
10.

Laos [electronic resource]: Culture, Development, and Heritage Protection

In Luang Prabang, amidst the customary begging of Buddhist monks and the irksome giddiness of camera-wielding tourists, history lies waiting on street after street of traditional architecture. This program takes viewers into the heart of the Laotian city, where builders and bureaucrats contest the fate of land, houses, and public structures while traditional artisans and architects work to preserve an ancient heritage. Highlighting cooperation between the city planning office and French investment programs, the film examines the impact of illegal construction, colonialism, and new building regulations on the cultural landscape. A renovated hospital, a roof tile production center, and wetland development are among several specific topics.
Online
2010; 2009
11.

Brazil [electronic resource]: Urban Planning Challenges

A city shouldn't be a problem, says Jaime Lerner, the former mayor of Curitiba. "It should be a solution." This program explores innovative planning, engineering, and conservation at work in the Brazilian metropolis as it transcends many of the problems plaguing other South American cities. The film spotlights fully modernized public transportation and recycling systems, a "Citizenship Street" zoning pattern that reduces high-volume traffic, an oil collection program that transforms used cooking grease into biofuel, and other successful initiatives. But the need for a waste-for-food exchange program demonstrates that even Curitiba must still contend with poverty and other social challenges.
Online
2010; 2009
12.

Madagascar [electronic resource]: Agro-Ecology

Illegal deforestation, slash-and-burn practices, poverty, land disputes-these are among the many problems associated with farming in Madagascar. This program guides viewers through the real-world challenges of building sustainable agriculture in the country. Outlining reasons why many growers are unable or unwilling to leave outmoded techniques behind, the film visits community offices that support local farmers in organizing, obtaining microfinancing, and increasing efficiency. Erosion, soil management, irrigation and drainage, and the development of mixed farming-or combining crop cultivation and animal herding-are examined. Ecologists, agriculture experts, and a traveling veterinarian add commentary.
Online
2010; 2009
13.

Mauritania [electronic resource]: Health Care for Pregnant Women

Each year, some 800 women in Mauritania die during childbirth. The country's mortality rate for children under age five is also alarmingly high-approximately 14,500 deaths annually. This program follows Mauritania's struggle to meet national objectives established with guidance from the United Nations-aiming at a 75-percent drop in maternal deaths and a 66-percent drop in child mortality by the year 2015. The film visits a badly equipped, severely understaffed gynecological health center in Kiffa; another in Sebkha, which has a new ultrasound machine but only intermittent electrical power; and an outreach team working in rural areas, where an innovative obstetrical health care program is gradually making a difference.
Online
2010; 2009
14.

Senegal, Tunisia, and Laos [electronic resource]: The Private Sector in Economic Growth

Does the future of capitalism favor the global corporations of the West-or small, competitive businesses that are homegrown in the developing world? This program offers valuable case studies that clearly illustrate both the challenges and the enormous potential of non-Western entrepreneurship. In Senegal, plastics manufacturer SIMPA has obtained funding for equipment upgrades and employee training, while clothing designer Kali Abu Sol has opened a Dakar boutique and is moving full steam toward international recognition. The film's Tunisia segment features the Hannibal Clinic, a state-of-the-art cancer treatment center, and the Laos portion covers fair trade measures for boosting coffee production, quality, and profitability.
Online
2010; 2009
15.

The Future of Food [electronic resource]: A Looming Crisis

According to Tim Lang, Professor of Food Policy at London's City University, future wars may be fought specifically over agricultural resources. Given the present volatility of food prices and the riots they provoked in 2008, his theory seems to be on the mark. This program assesses the potential for a global food crisis as it guides viewers through issues involving climate change, oil consumption, biofuel development, fish stock depletion, and other topics. A Rift Valley herder discusses drought in Africa; a Cuban scholar details the impact of the Soviet collapse on food transportation in his country; an Indian farmer reports being pressured into planting jatropha instead of food crops; and Senegalese fishermen lament the intrusion of Western corporate interests. A Blakeway Televisi [...]
Online
2010; 2009
16.

Money [electronic resource]: Who Creates It? Who Controls It? Who Profits?

In this program, Turkish filmmaker Isaac Isitan investigates recent economic crises in Turkey and Argentina, with a focus on their roots and their effects upon the middle classes in both countries. How could these two countries have gone bankrupt within a decade? The financial turmoil began in the 1980s, when the IMF ordered structural adjustment programs in the agricultural industry and the privatization of government businesses to fund payment of external debts. Furthermore, banks faced with insolvency began closing their doors, denying account-holders access to their life savings. Confronted by a lack of money, citizens in both countries reinvent it through large-scale bartering systems.
Online
2009; 2004
17.

The Global Marketplace [electronic resource]: Benefits of Globalization

In an age of globalization, companies are scrambling to blend the ideals of social justice with the concept of a free-market economy. Drawing on case studies from around the world, this program focuses on progressive efforts being made by businesses to unite profits and principles. Issues under consideration include the practice of social responsibility through ethical investment policies and codes of conduct, the human and environmental costs of unscrupulous manufacturing, and a renewed emphasis on good employee/employer and supplier/retailer relations.
Online
2006; 2000
18.

The Global Dimension [electronic resource]: Risks of Globalization

Despite unprecedented growth in the world economy as a whole, some 1.5 billion people in developing countries live in extreme poverty, and the living conditions for twice that number are almost as deplorable. This program investigates how both trade and financial aid are being used to help Costa Rica and other third-world nations bridge the technological divide and gain much-needed know-how so that they can improve their ways of life and prosper in the burgeoning global economy.
Online
2006; 2000
19.

Global Resources [electronic resource]: Management and Competition

What is the relationship between a country's natural assets and its economic power? Does wealth in raw materials alone lead to monetary wealth? What are the dangers of relying on finite supplies? This program explores economic questions surrounding the management of-and international competition for-natural resources. Describing the process by which nations translate the products of their forests, fields, mines, and waters into economic and political power, the video provides insight into the drive to control natural resources, the role they play in the economic development of poor countries, the precarious concept of the "global commons," and the connection between resource mismanagement and environmental damage. Recent events in the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America highlight hi [...]
Online
2006; 2007
20.

Where's the Catch? [electronic resource]: Pacific Fishing in Crisis

Plenty of fish in the sea may endure as a platitude, but the expression runs afoul of current marine biology. This program examines the dangerous depletion of Pacific Ocean fish stocks, an echo of the overfishing that has ravaged the Atlantic. Contrasting the tuna industries of wealthy countries with the localized fishing many developing nations engage in, the video features case studies of the socioeconomic impact of overfishing on Fiji, Kiribati, and the Marshall Islands, and analyzes political systems that enable harmful and often illegal fishing to continue. Activist and pro-regulatory groups that confront these problems are profiled with a tentative optimism.
Online
2006; 2005