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1.

Samsara

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Prepare yourself for an unparalleled sensory experience. Filmed over a period of almost five years and in twenty-five countries, it explores the wonders of the world from sacred grounds to industrial sites, looking into the unfathomable reaches of man's spirituality and the human experience. Photographed entirely in 70mm and transferred to 4K digital projection format, its mesmerizing images of unprecedented clarity illuminate the links between humanity and the rest of nature.
DVD
2012
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Cultural Geography [electronic resource]

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Introduces the study of cultural geography, which focuses on how we shape our surrounding space, and how natural and man-made landscapes affect our perspectives. Examines literary texts through the lens of relationships of people to their environments.
Online
2003
4.

Latin America [electronic resource]

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In Guatemala, a historical geographer explores the reasons for the decline of the Maya and their present-day explosive growth. In Ecuador, physical geographers work toward reducing the potential hazards of living near an active volcano. Classroom segments feature students investigating the migration of Mexican populations and, after discerning patterns of volcano location, discussing the issues of living near volcanoes.
Online
2002
5.

North America [electronic resource]

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Through studies of ethnic and economic diversity in Boston and suburban sprawl in Chicago, this session illustrates issues of urban development and expansion in North America. Classroom segments demonstrate how teachers can use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and census data to investigate similar issues in their own communities.
Online
2002
6.

North Africa/Southwest Asia [electronic resource]

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Explores problems of religious conflict and urban organization with a case study on Jerusalem as sacred space. It also looks at urban and agricultural use of scarce water resources by studying Egypt's Nile River. Classroom segments show students exploring the problems of refugee populations and engaging in a hands-on activity about the Nile River Delta.
Online
2002
7.

Sub-Saharan Africa [electronic resource]

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Features case studies on the impact of apartheid on present-day South Africa and on AIDS diffusion in Kenya. Classroom segments show educators using role-playing activities to teach students about land allocation in South Africa and the impact of the AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Online
2002
8.

Russia [electronic resource]

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A case study examines the history of St. Petersburg and its adaptation to a post-Soviet society. Students learn, through a constructivist teaching approach, about the geographic factors behind the location of St. Petersburg and other Russian cities. Cultural mosaics are the focus of a case study on the Russian republic of Dagestan and a classroom segment in which students role-play the negotiation of cultural boundaries in a fictional country.
Online
2002
9.

Europe [electronic resource]

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Two case studies analyze developments toward a more unified Europe. First is an exploration of Berlin's role as the dynamic capital of a reunified Germany and as a centrally located city in an increasingly unified Europe. Students analyze issues of urban organization in Amsterdam. Supranationalism and the European Union are examined through a case study on Strasbourg and further explored in a classroom debate.
Online
2002
10.

Global Forces/Local Impact [electronic resource]

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A case study focuses on globalization's impact on the booming Chinese economy and the population that drives it. Students analyze economic data to understand the disparity in the quality of life in Southeast Asia. The second case study examines the conflict between Native Americans and farmers over water usage in Oregon. Students perform field research to determine how human activities affect the quality and availability of water resources.
Online
2002
11.

America the Ugly [electronic resource]: Searching for a Better Way to Live

Since World War II, suburbia has taken over broad sections of America, squeezing out Main Street USA in favor of cookie-cutter subdivisions, shopping centers, and business parks. Is the New Urbanism-in which the needs of people, not cars, come first-the antidote for suburban sprawl? In this program, ABC News anchor Forrest Sawyer and correspondent Michel McQueen report on the housing paradigm called "traditional neighborhood developments" with architect and town planner Andres Duany, known as the Pied Piper of New Urbanism and creator of communities such as Kentlands, Maryland, and Seaside, Florida.
Online
2007; 1998
12.

Iran [electronic resource]: Departure Into the Unknown

In Iran, even laughter is considered sinful by the nation's strict Shiite regime. Yet after revolution and war, Iranians cherish hopes of a freer future. This program describes the impact of life in a modern fundamentalist society on Iran's diverse population, which includes Muslims, Christians, and Jews. It also spotlights the joyful celebration of Sizdah Bedar, which welcomes the spring; the incomparable Iranian crown jewels; monuments such as the magnificent palace of Shah Abas the First, the huge Imam Mosque, the ruins of Persepolis, and the wind towers of Nain; and the lifestyles of artisans, craftspeople, laborers, and students.
Online
2007; 1998
13.

India [electronic resource]: River of Life

Containing nearly a sixth of the world's population, India is home to almost a billion people, more than half of whom live in rural villages. This program provides an overview of topics such as the caste system as it exists in the holy Hindu town of Varanasi and the massive pilgrimages to Allahabad, where millions of Hindus come to ritually bathe at the confluence of the Ganges and Yamuna Rivers. Also discussed are arranged marriages; local trades in Agra, site of the matchless Taj Mahal; Sikhism in the city of Amritsar; the Indian/Pakistani tug-of-war for Kashmir; and the plight of small farmers, driven from their holdings by powerful landowners.
Online
2005; 1998
14.

Burma [electronic resource]: In the Garden of the Crying Buddha

Renamed Myanmar by its ruling junta, Burma is one of the world's poorest nations due to decades of iron-fisted military control and despite its valuable natural resources and priceless national treasures. This program presents an intriguing glimpse of Burmese life, ranging from washing the sacred Buddha at the Maha Muni Pagoda and the initiation of young Buddhist novices amid the ruins of Bagan to farming the amazing floating gardens of Lake Inle. Issues including Burma's 40-year civil war, the vital role of the railway and the cinema, and rampant smuggling are addressed as well.
Online
2007; 1998
15.

Laos [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of the Giants

Impoverished, sparsely populated, and still recovering from the Vietnam War, Laos exists on the edge of the abyss. This program considers the cultural and economic impact on Laotians and Hmong alike of initiatives designed to improve the country, such as the new highway being built by Swedish engineers. Although the regime's "reeducation camps" show no signs of being closed and antigovernment rebels continue to make travel dangerous, foreign tourism is being courted for the currency it can bring, while the country's rich spiritual life-expressed through the practices of Buddhism and animism-serenely continues.
Online
2007; 1998
16.

The State of World Population Report [electronic resource]

According to the latest statistics from the United Nations Population Fund, the momentum of world population growth has slowed. But does that mean the population boom is over? This program summarizes the results of the most recent State of World Population Report, highlighting key changes in fertility rates and family size, as well as demographic shifts and the implications of increased human longevity. A United Nations Production.
Online
2006; 2001
17.

Death and Dying in Varanasi [electronic resource]

Situated by the bank of the holy Ganges, Varanasi, also known as Kashi and Benares, is one of the oldest living cities in the world. Founded approximately 3,000 years ago, the city is the religious and cultural capital of India-considered by many to be the holiest place on earth. Every year Hindus in great number go there to die, believing that cremation in that place of renewal provides an immediate entry to heaven. Shot on location, this program celebrates life and death, examines the Hindu beliefs and rituals about life and death, and discusses how these forces have sustained Varanasi through history.
Online
2006; 2002
18.

A Living Goddess in Kathmandu [electronic resource]

The Kumari, a flesh-and-blood goddess, is revered by both Hindus and Buddhists in Nepal as a protector of the land and defender of all living beings. This program traces the mythological underpinnings of the Kumari and presents the living tradition of Kumari worship, including the Kumari selection, the secret preparation rituals, and Kumari-related festivals and ceremonies. It also discusses the relationship between the Kumari and the king.
Online
2006; 2002
19.

Hutong [electronic resource]: Alleyways of Change in Contemporary Beijing

As Beijing prepares for the 2008 Olympics, most of the hutong-the city's small traditional dwellings and the network of lanes and alleys formed by them-are being demolished to make room for skyscrapers. This program explores social and cultural changes in historical Beijing, as seen in the life of a few ordinary citizens who still live in the hutong. The program includes computer models of the designing of ancient Beijing City.
Online
2006; 2002
20.

Paul Ehrlich and the Population Bomb [electronic resource]

The human population is likely to double by the middle of the 21st century, soaring past 10 billion people. How will all these people survive? Will there be enough resources to meet everyone's needs or will there be massive social upheaval, famine, and rampant pollution? These questions have been a consuming passion for biologist and environmental pioneer Paul Ehrlich, who set out decades ago to persuade the world that continued and unchecked population growth would upset the balance of nature and further widen the gap between developed and developing nations. Based on Ehrlich's best-selling book, The Population Bomb, this program features compelling archival footage from around the world, as well as interviews with Ehrlich, his colleagues, and his critics.
Online
2006; 1996