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61.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009
62.

Niger [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of Noma

Noma is an acute oral infection that attacks young, malnourished children. If left untreated-which, tragically, is often the case in Africa-it devours bone tissue and permanently disfigures its victims. This unflinching program studies the impact of the pitiless disease and will help viewers assess the ability and readiness of the international community to combat the suffering. Graphic scenes of school-age noma patients are interwoven with commentary from medical experts and heartbreaking accounts from family members who have watched as sons, daughters, and grandchildren succumb to the sickness. The film also describes low-cost interventions that could keep noma from spreading, if resources are made available.
Online
2010; 2009
63.

Paraguay [electronic resource]: Soya and Pesticides

When an 11-year-old Paraguayan boy named Silvino Talavera died from pesticide poisoning in 2003, his name became a rallying cry in the fight against intensive soya production. This program recounts the tragedy and the legal, political, and economic impact of "agritoxins" in Latin America. Opening with a poetically filmed reenactment and moving on to feature key players in the story, the film includes an interview with Fernando Lugo-a Catholic priest whose election to Paraguay's presidency shifted policy away from large-scale agricultural interests toward more populist causes. Land redistribution and genetic modification emerge as central topics in this look at a controversy that is far from over.
Online
2010; 2009
64.

Chad [electronic resource]: Hydraulic Projects and Peace

Characterized as an LDC or Least Developed Country, the nation of Chad wrestles with drought, population growth, and resulting tensions between farmers and herders. This program investigates hydraulic projects and mediation initiatives that are fostering relationships between Chad's food growers and its nomadic, livestock-centered cultures. Overviewing the basic causes of Chadian land disputes and competition for water sources as well as failed modernization schemes proposed during the 1960s, the film explores new solutions based on recognizing traditional agriculture and natural migration routes. Viewers witness "sit-down" talks between farmers and herders that could help prevent regional conflicts from flaring up.
Online
2010; 2009
65.

Senegal [electronic resource]: Water Treatment and Distribution

Our most valuable treasure, is how residents of Dakar describe the Bay of Han. But pollution from both residential and industrial sources is destroying the body of water that has long supported fishing families in the Senegalese capital. This program reports on Western-aided efforts to restore the bay's ecological health and its viability as an economic resource. Specific challenges include the lack of plumbing services in many Dakar homes and harmful by-products from businesses-exemplified by waste from a local slaughterhouse. Solutions focus on improved piping and drainage, better sewage collection and infrastructure, and the construction of a new water treatment plant and waste discharge system.
Online
2010; 2009
66.

Laos [electronic resource]: Culture, Development, and Heritage Protection

In Luang Prabang, amidst the customary begging of Buddhist monks and the irksome giddiness of camera-wielding tourists, history lies waiting on street after street of traditional architecture. This program takes viewers into the heart of the Laotian city, where builders and bureaucrats contest the fate of land, houses, and public structures while traditional artisans and architects work to preserve an ancient heritage. Highlighting cooperation between the city planning office and French investment programs, the film examines the impact of illegal construction, colonialism, and new building regulations on the cultural landscape. A renovated hospital, a roof tile production center, and wetland development are among several specific topics.
Online
2010; 2009
67.

Brazil [electronic resource]: Urban Planning Challenges

A city shouldn't be a problem, says Jaime Lerner, the former mayor of Curitiba. "It should be a solution." This program explores innovative planning, engineering, and conservation at work in the Brazilian metropolis as it transcends many of the problems plaguing other South American cities. The film spotlights fully modernized public transportation and recycling systems, a "Citizenship Street" zoning pattern that reduces high-volume traffic, an oil collection program that transforms used cooking grease into biofuel, and other successful initiatives. But the need for a waste-for-food exchange program demonstrates that even Curitiba must still contend with poverty and other social challenges.
Online
2010; 2009
68.

Madagascar [electronic resource]: Agro-Ecology

Illegal deforestation, slash-and-burn practices, poverty, land disputes-these are among the many problems associated with farming in Madagascar. This program guides viewers through the real-world challenges of building sustainable agriculture in the country. Outlining reasons why many growers are unable or unwilling to leave outmoded techniques behind, the film visits community offices that support local farmers in organizing, obtaining microfinancing, and increasing efficiency. Erosion, soil management, irrigation and drainage, and the development of mixed farming-or combining crop cultivation and animal herding-are examined. Ecologists, agriculture experts, and a traveling veterinarian add commentary.
Online
2010; 2009
69.

China [electronic resource]: Sustainable Homebuilding

Having overtaken the U.S. as the world's biggest polluter, China is now responsible for 11 percent of all greenhouse gas production. Can the country reduce its carbon footprint without slowing its unprecedented economic growth? This program shows how that question is playing out in the Chinese construction industry, highlighting the creation and practical application of new homebuilding standards. Collaboration between French and Chinese experts has led to groundbreaking insulation techniques-illustrated here in conversations with architects, site managers, building residents, and instructors in the sustainable development program at the Wuhan University of Science and Technology.
Online
2010; 2009
70.

Congo Basin [electronic resource]: Sustainable Forestry

Among the largest, most pristine areas of tropical woodland on the planet, the Congo Basin forests could easily fall prey to shortsighted and exploitative commercial interests. This program looks at sustainable lumber production initiatives taking root in the region, with a focus on cutting-edge forestry management as well as economic growth through increased cooperation between local concession-holders. Viewers join a planning team and a chain-saw crew in the remote woodlands of Gabon as they take great care to preserve the fragile ecosystem, and another team of advisors as they set up meetings between small African foresters-who, despite initial skepticism, see a need for collective economic leverage.
Online
2010; 2009
71.

The Pacific [electronic resource]: Biodiversity and the Protection of Coral Reefs

Virtually every reef system in the world is endangered, and the island nations of the South Pacific provide some of the most troubling examples. This program examines the uncertain future of tropical offshore ecosystems using the French collectivity of New Caledonia as a case study. Viewers accompany lagoon protection crew members as they patrol fragile marine reserves by boat; an itinerant researcher who describes frequent legal conflicts between tribal interests and environmental regulations; and outreach personnel working with Kanak and Melanesian leaders to reduce traditional hillside burns, which lead to high sediment levels in lagoons.
Online
2010; 2009
72.

Lost Road of the Inca: Part 1 [electronic resource]

Karin Muller is an American on a quest to understand other cultures. This program follows her as she begins her journey of discovery along the route of the ancient Incan highway through South America. In Ecuador, she endures tear gas during a labor riot and witnesses backbreaking toil in a crude, antiquated gold mine. On the disputed border between Ecuador and Peru, she watches ordnance troops unearth and detonate a land mine, visits the lonely graves of fallen soldiers, and-in a life-affirming turn-finds welcome respite in drinking boiled yucca tea at a family farm. Muller provides engaging and eloquent voice-over commentary as her trek progresses.
Online
2010; 1999
73.

Lost Road of the Inca: Part 2 [electronic resource]

From medicinal shamans to taxi drivers in rusty death traps, this program plunges further into the depth and breadth of life in South America-following American adventurer Karin Muller as she travels the ancient Incan highway. Muller joins Peruvian fishermen plying their trade in handmade reed boats; watches herds of vicuna penned and sheared of their precious wool; absorbs the spectacle of Machu Picchu and its sophisticated stonework; and encounters the spirit of Carnival and Catholic devotion in Bolivia. Then comes a euphoric motorcycle ride into Chile-until Muller reaches Santiago, reenters the world of billboards and fast food, and bids farewell to a landscape of countless cultural riches.
Online
2010; 1999
74.

The Future of Food [electronic resource]: A Looming Crisis

According to Tim Lang, Professor of Food Policy at London's City University, future wars may be fought specifically over agricultural resources. Given the present volatility of food prices and the riots they provoked in 2008, his theory seems to be on the mark. This program assesses the potential for a global food crisis as it guides viewers through issues involving climate change, oil consumption, biofuel development, fish stock depletion, and other topics. A Rift Valley herder discusses drought in Africa; a Cuban scholar details the impact of the Soviet collapse on food transportation in his country; an Indian farmer reports being pressured into planting jatropha instead of food crops; and Senegalese fishermen lament the intrusion of Western corporate interests. A Blakeway Televisi [...]
Online
2010; 2009
75.

Conflict on a Local Scale [electronic resource]

This program examines types of conflict that can occur at the local level, whether that locality is a single town, a region, or an entire country. After generally addressing armed conflict-different types of war, where they tend to proliferate, and kinds of weaponry used-Conflict on a Local Scale illustrates unarmed conflict through five examples. They include a clash of recreational interests in Britain's Lake District; in Cambodia, the forced eviction of residents from confiscated oceanfront real estate; the potential expansion of England's Heathrow Airport, which would necessitate the leveling of an entire town; tensions over inadequate water supplies in Ukraine, an instance of cooperative conflict resolution; and a municipal planning crisis involving a supermarket chain in the Br [...]
Online
2010; 2009
76.

Global Conflict [electronic resource]

This program-a valuable tool for introducing the concepts of energy security, antiterrorism, and managing change at the global level-identifies the roots of violent conflict by way of specific examples. Through discussion of territorial conflicts (India/Pakistan, Israel/PLO), genocides (Rwanda, Srebrenica), terrorism (al Qaeda, IRA, ETA), and hybridized violence such as that found in Sudan, Global Conflict makes the case that an understanding of the sources of conflict, combined with the free exchange of information internationally, is the key to reducing strife at all levels.
Online
2010; 2009
77.

Consequences of Conflict [electronic resource]

The consequences of armed conflict are complex and long-lasting. Using Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan as points of departure, this program examines some of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of conflicts at the national and international levels. Topics include the pernicious phenomenon of child soldiers; the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons; thorny issues related to aid money and international assistance; the enduring scars of war on the landscape; the repercussions of ruined infrastructural elements such as power grids; and the unquantifiable losses-the what-could-have-beens-that inevitably occur when a nation's money is diverted from education and health care.
Online
2010; 2009
78.

Cambodia [electronic resource]: The Virginity Trade

Some Asian traditions hold that sex with a virgin will bring a man good luck and health. Tragically, the custom is far from moribund-in the dark world of Southeast Asian prostitution there is a growing demand for younger and younger companions. This program reveals the disturbing inner workings of Cambodia's child-sex industry as well as its manifold human consequences. Viewers meet teenage girls who entered the trade as high-priced virgins-some under coercion, others to support their families, all ending up trapped in slavery. Additional interviews feature activists from human rights NGOs such as APLE, an agency with ties to France, and LICADHO, a group based in Cambodia.
Online
2010; 2008
79.

The Arctic Circle [electronic resource]: On Thin Ice

For thousands of years, the only threat to polar bears came from humans. Nothing has changed-except now it is fossil fuel consumption, not spears and guns, that pushes Ursus maritimus toward extinction. Depicting the hapless species as the proverbial canary in a coal mine, this program studies the intensifying impact of climate change on the Arctic region. Viewers learn how the entire Arctic food chain, from tiny zooplankton to the ringed seal to the mighty polar bear, is under stress from ice depletion-and how severe drops in sea-ice thickness are related to the alarming appearance of meltwater channels and crevasse-like pits across glaciers in Norway and Greenland. Animated views of these anomalies help illustrate what is happening to the frozen landscape.
Online
2010; 2009
80.

Diane Sawyer in China Video Clip Collection [electronic resource]

China's global influence has grown enormously since the turn of the new century. Now the second-largest economy in the world, its citizens are buying up consumer goods both domestically and from abroad in record numbers. In this collection of 12 ABC News segments, anchor Diane Sawyer travels from Beijing to Shanghai exploring life in the Asian nation and the part the U.S. has played in shaping its economic initiatives. Clip duration ranges from 2 to 5 minutes.
Online
2010