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1.

Mother: Caring for 7 Billion

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"Mother, the film, breaks a 40-year taboo by bringing to light an issue that silently fuels our largest environmental, humanitarian and social crises - population growth. Since the 1960s the world population has nearly doubled, adding more than 3 billion people. At the same time, talking about population has become politically incorrect because of the sensitivity of the issues surrounding the topic- religion, economics, family planning, and gender inequality. The film illustrates both the over consumption and the inequity side of the population issue by following Beth, a mother, a child-rights activist, and the last sibling of a large American family of twelve, as she discovers the thorny complexities of the population dilemma and highlights a different path to solve it" -- IMDb website.
DVD
2013
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

First Steps Into the Unknown [electronic resource]

Carved in stone or scratched in clay, the first maps appeared at least 5,000 years ago. This program chronicles the rise of geographical awareness-manifested not only in crude cartography, but also through word of mouth and narratives such as Homer's Odyssey and the Viking sagas. Clearly illustrating the forces behind navigational learning and excursions into the unknown, this program presents scholarly commentary on the abilities of Roman and medieval armies to travel across Europe, Christianity's Jerusalem-centric world view, and the emergence of Portugal as a leader in seafaring technology.
Online
2006; 2004
3.

The Poet of Trauma Farm [electronic resource]: Brian Brett

This episode of The Green Interview features Brian Brett, a passionate and diverse award-winning Canadian novelist, critic, and poet. His latest book, Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life, is a lyrical, honest, and often amusing portrayal of rural life interspersed with thought-provoking reflections about the modern world, and rooted throughout by a profound knowledge of biology and botany. It is his memoir based on the last 18 years spent tending a small mixed farm-affectionately named Trauma Farm-on Salt Spring Island in the Gulf Islands of British Columbia. In his book-and in this Green Interview-Brett explores the social realities of rural community life and the consequences of our estrangement from the interconnectedness of all things.
Online
2012