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1.

Senegal [electronic resource]: Water Treatment and Distribution

Our most valuable treasure, is how residents of Dakar describe the Bay of Han. But pollution from both residential and industrial sources is destroying the body of water that has long supported fishing families in the Senegalese capital. This program reports on Western-aided efforts to restore the bay's ecological health and its viability as an economic resource. Specific challenges include the lack of plumbing services in many Dakar homes and harmful by-products from businesses-exemplified by waste from a local slaughterhouse. Solutions focus on improved piping and drainage, better sewage collection and infrastructure, and the construction of a new water treatment plant and waste discharge system.
Online
2010; 2009
2.

The Weather Video Clip Collection [electronic resource]

The weather-a phenomenon clearly beyond human control!-is nevertheless a topic of fascination to people the world over. A combination of high-quality film footage and detailed animations, this collection of 48 video clips (30 seconds to 2 minutes each) discusses Earth's atmosphere, precipitation, meteorology, climates, the environment, and pollution. Video clips include: Earth's Atmosphere-Introduction; The Atmosphere; Atmospheric Pressure; The Movement of Air Masses; Wind; Precipitation-Introduction; Humidity; Cloud Formation; Identifying Clouds; Dew and Fog; Rainbows; Lightning and Thunder; Meteorology-Introduction; Measurement Instruments; Measuring the Temperature; Balloons and Radar; Geostationary Satellites; Polar-Orbiting Satellites; Weather Maps; Climates-Introduction; The S [...]
Online
2011; 2004
3.

Mercury Undercover [electronic resource]: Toxic Dental Fillings and Other Horror Stories

Dental amalgam, a material commonly used in fillings, contains more mercury than any other medical product sold in America. Why is this toxic substance still on the market and is there political pressure keeping it there? To what extent have the FDA and ADA concealed the risk of dental amalgam fillings from the public? This eye-opening documentary features interviews with scientists, doctors, patients, and attorneys who share disturbing conclusions about mercury toxicity-and not just from dental work. Viewers learn how mercury pollution results from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources. From species endangerment to compromised food safety, the hazards of high mercury levels in fish and wildlife are depicted in a manner that is certain to galvanize environmental scienc [...]
Online
2011
4.

Natural Allies [electronic resource]

Have Earth's vibrant waterways-its streams, rivers, lakes, and oceans-become delivery systems for pollutants and poison? This program points to signs that toxic substances are overwhelming our planet's aquatic ecosystems. Viewers encounter many of the causes for this concern, including a radical decrease in frog populations, distressed marine mammals in estuary habitats, and disturbing changes in reef biodiversity.
Online
2010; 2004
5.

Seeds of Change [electronic resource]: Case Study of Sustainable Development in China

After surviving an emergency crash-landing, Dr. Sam Chao resolved to do something that would make a difference in the world. This award-winning program follows the outcome of his resolution: ECO, the Ecological Conservancy Outreach fund. Donating his life savings to the project, Dr. Chao enlists his childhood friend, Dr. Larry Wang, to clean up the Yangtze River and its tributaries, ravaged by erosion due to deforestation. As the video shows, sustainable ecological improvement must be linked to economic improvement for farmers whose very lives hang in the balance of such plans. Filmed largely in China's Yunnan province, Seeds of Change visits the farmers who switch from growing crops on the riverbanks to forest-based agriculture.
Online
2009; 2008
6.

Scientists Under Attack [electronic resource]: When Corporate Interests Control Research

According to some estimates, 95 percent of scientists conducting research in the field of genetic engineering are funded by agribusiness or related industries. What happens when researchers decide to work independently, steering clear of corporate influences? What are the consequences when scientific findings go against the interests of deep-pocket donors? This film profiles scientists who, based on rigorous investigation, have criticized the use of genetic modification and have been ostracized-some might say punished-for their conclusions. Viewers learn about the work of Dr. Ignacio Chapela, a Mexican biologist who faced a dubious public relations campaign against him and his Nature article on genetically modified maize, as well as the case of Dr. Arpad Pusztai, a Hungarian-born bio [...]
Online
2009
7.

Stemming the Flow of Water Pollution: Part 1 [electronic resource]

The UN Environment Program has identified approximately 150 dead zones in the Earth's seas-some more than 40,000 square miles in size. Examining causes ranging from too many partially cremated bodies in the Ganges to defunct sewage systems in Nairobi, this program explains how watercourses flowing into the seas are being polluted and coastal areas are being destroyed. The catastrophic effects on marine habitats as well as on the health and livelihoods of people living near such blighted areas are discussed, and some fruitful protests and surprising innovations are brought to light.
Online
2006; 2004
8.

Stemming the Flow of Water Pollution: Part 2 [electronic resource]

The Donana marshland. The oyster beds below Rio. The Caspian's sturgeon fishing grounds. The coral reefs of the South Pacific. This program travels to Spain, Brazil, Iran, and Fiji to observe efforts to mitigate severe ecological damage to these sensitive regions-places primarily spoiled by water pollution, with causes as varied as upland agricultural runoff and the rupture of a mine tailings dam. Solutions such as preservation legislation, riverbank reconstruction, the creation of artificial wetlands, cultivation of depleted species of marine life, and even voluntary anti-pollution compliance among commercial stakeholders are featured.
Online
2006; 2004
9.

Living in the Shadow of Zonolite Mountain [electronic resource]

Much of what is known about the environmental disaster in Libby, Montana, has been due to the unflagging efforts of residents Les Skramstad, U.S. attorney for Montana, and Gayla Benefield. In this ABC News program, these determined individuals are joined by Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Andrew Schneider; Drs. Brad Black and Alan Whitehouse, of Libby's Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; and others to speak candidly about the situation there. Topics include the history of vermiculite mining in the area, allegations against W. R. Grace of covering up the presence of tremolite asbestos in the ore, and the shocking toll on the health of those who live in the shadow of Zonolite Mountain.
Online
2006; 2005
10.

Direct From Libby [electronic resource]: Vermiculite and Asbestos

The tremolite asbestos-tainted vermiculite from Zonolite Mountain has spread its lethal legacy well beyond Montana and the town of Libby, where it was mined and milled for decades: over the years, 236 cities in 42 states received billions of pounds of it to be processed into a range of consumer products. This ABC News program focuses on trouble spots in Michigan, New Jersey, and Colorado. With an estimated 15 to 30 million homes containing the deadly stuff in the form of attic insulation-and remediation costs that can run into the tens of thousands of dollars per household-this is a health and financial crisis of no small magnitude.
Online
2006; 2005
11.

Mysterious Poison [electronic resource]: History of PCBs

They are now banned worldwide-but the toxins known as PCBs are not going away. This program explains how the compounds have almost irreparably polluted the globe and still threaten future generations. The film begins in 1927, when PCBs became integral to electric power and, eventually, a vast array of agricultural and technological products. Describing the growth of scientific awareness of PCB-related threats across the food chain, the program features compelling interviews with researchers who helped uncover the hereditary hazards of PCBs-including World Wildlife Fund senior scientist Dr. Theo Colburn and University of Stockholm professor Soren Jensen.
Online
2006
12.

California Dry [electronic resource]: Water Crisis in the Golden State

As fresh water sources dwindle in the arid American Southwest, California faces growing difficulty in managing and sustaining its irrigation infrastructure. This program analyzes the multifaceted problem, sifting through environmental and political factors and assessing a number of potential solutions. Beginning its fact-finding tour at the Water Education Foundation in Sacramento, the film highlights challenges related to levees, marine tidewaters, and endangered species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Controversial desalinization projects near Long Beach and San Diego are also studied, along with "toilet to tap" sewage water conversion in Orange County.
Online
2009; 2008
13.

The Ganges River [electronic resource]: Sacred and Sullied

Rising from a Himalayan ice cave and emptying into the bay of Bengal, the Ganges River is sacred to Hindus as a purifying spirit-yet it currently suffers from pollution and neglect. This program follows the Ganges through various Indian cities, studying their relationship with the river and assessing its uncertain future. Beginning in Gangotri, the program profiles a photographer who has documented disturbing changes on the surrounding ice fields. Next comes Haridwar, situated on fertile flood plains-the breadbasket of India-and then Kanpur, a megacity of four million blanketed by industrial smog. The final stop is Varanasi, the most revered city in the Hindu world.
Online
2009; 2008
14.

The Mississippi River [electronic resource]: Triumphant and Tragic

Its name conjures images of America's mythical past, encoded in the stories and novels of Mark Twain. But today's Mississippi River is rife with challenges no 19th-century storyteller could have imagined. From issues of basic survival to triumphs of creativity and profit, this program follows the day-to-day lives of those who dwell on the Mississippi. Starting in the town of Cairo, Illinois-where America's north and south intermingle-the program moves on to Memphis, home of the once-glorious Stax Records and a mecca of blues, soul, and rock 'n' roll music. Moving through the Delta, viewers meet struggling shrimp fishermen, a Cajun community, survivors of the 1927 floods, and survivors of Katrina.
Online
2009; 2008
15.

The Nile River [electronic resource]: Shared or Monopolized?

Were it not for the elemental forces of the Nile River, the great architecture of ancient Egypt and Ethiopia might never have been built. But in today's water-starved world, the river could lead both countries down a destructive path. This program examines lives and livelihoods that depend on the Nile, from the humble to the hugely ambitious. In Egypt, viewers encounter a struggling Cairo fishing family, a father-and-son farming team, and the nation's irrigation minister, who discusses diverting part of the river into a new valley. Moving to the source of the Nile, the program depicts Ethiopia's efforts to exploit the river-a series of hydroelectric projects that have created tension with Egypt.
Online
2009; 2008
16.

The Rhine [electronic resource]: River of Unity and Diversity

Rich in history, the Rhine feeds Europe's collective identity-as well as its divisions. Flowing from Switzerland through Austria, Germany, France, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands, the river intersects a multitude of towns and cities in the process. This program follows the Rhine on its multifaceted journey and examines economic, political, environmental, and historical issues surrounding it. Viewers travel from Rotterdam, where vessels laden with goods leave Europe, to Hinterrhein, a Swiss town beneath the Rhinewaldhorn glacier. Along the way, the program examines invasive species, the threat of chemical spills, the horror of Kristallnacht, and the immigrant experience in Europe.
Online
2009; 2008
17.

The Yangtze River [electronic resource]: China's Wild Lifeline

Among the most utilized waterways in the world, the Yangtze River is also one of the most volatile. This program sheds light on humanity's battle to tame and profit from the river-specifically, a project initiated by Chiang Kai-shek in the 1930s. The program also studies corresponding ecological problems. Viewers are introduced to the Three Gorges Dam, a concrete mega-structure visible from space, which has created huge economic benefits but also displaced thousands from their homes and irrevocably altered silt flow, geological formations, and fish stock levels. Citizens who have relocated and adapted offer commentary, along with scientists and engineers familiar with "China's New Great Wall.
Online
2009; 2008
18.

Chemical Conundrum [electronic resource]

Consider the following irony: that we live twice as long as our ancient ancestors did, even though our bodies contain all manner of synthetic and sometimes toxic substances-an unpleasant requirement of life in our modern age. This program explores the health impact, wide variety, and alarming ubiquity of manufactured chemicals. Viewers will see how communities around the world-including Inuit seal hunters, Asian and African farmers, and residents of an industrial town in the United States-address the pervasiveness of molecular compounds found in pesticides, plastics, and other products. The benefits of these chemicals are weighed against their dangers.
Online
2008; 2005
19.

Global Dump [electronic resource]: Toxic Waste and the Planetary Ecosystem

While international corporations boast of newfound environmental stewardship, toxic materials are still produced on a worldwide scale-with underdeveloped nations serving as the planet's dump site. This program explores the issue, traveling to Asia, Africa, and Latin America to illustrate the effects of industrial waste on the environment, social systems, and human life. Viewers will gain an understanding of several topics: the impact of pesticides and other chemical products, the role of large-scale food waste, the dangers low-wage workers face as they pick through urban trash heaps, and more. Images of discarded ships rusting in shallow harbors epitomize Western wastefulness and compose one of many powerful sequences in the film.
Online
2008; 2007
20.

Plankton Planet [electronic resource]: Harmed by Humans

Plankton fills an essential niche in Earth's food chain and a vital role in the health of the planetary ecosystem. For several decades, however, a growing level of human impact on the biosphere has been increasingly modifying the age-old equilibrium of marine plankton. This program examines the broad implications of three major concerns: how the inadvertent transfer of invasive plankton species via ship ballast is negatively altering the biodiversity of plankton; how agricultural runoff and other pollutants are affecting plankton populations; and how rising sea temperatures due to global warming are facilitating the proliferation of toxic plankton species.
Online
2010