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1.

Iran [electronic resource]: Departure Into the Unknown

In Iran, even laughter is considered sinful by the nation's strict Shiite regime. Yet after revolution and war, Iranians cherish hopes of a freer future. This program describes the impact of life in a modern fundamentalist society on Iran's diverse population, which includes Muslims, Christians, and Jews. It also spotlights the joyful celebration of Sizdah Bedar, which welcomes the spring; the incomparable Iranian crown jewels; monuments such as the magnificent palace of Shah Abas the First, the huge Imam Mosque, the ruins of Persepolis, and the wind towers of Nain; and the lifestyles of artisans, craftspeople, laborers, and students.
Online
2007; 1998
2.

India [electronic resource]: River of Life

Containing nearly a sixth of the world's population, India is home to almost a billion people, more than half of whom live in rural villages. This program provides an overview of topics such as the caste system as it exists in the holy Hindu town of Varanasi and the massive pilgrimages to Allahabad, where millions of Hindus come to ritually bathe at the confluence of the Ganges and Yamuna Rivers. Also discussed are arranged marriages; local trades in Agra, site of the matchless Taj Mahal; Sikhism in the city of Amritsar; the Indian/Pakistani tug-of-war for Kashmir; and the plight of small farmers, driven from their holdings by powerful landowners.
Online
2005; 1998
3.

Burma [electronic resource]: In the Garden of the Crying Buddha

Renamed Myanmar by its ruling junta, Burma is one of the world's poorest nations due to decades of iron-fisted military control and despite its valuable natural resources and priceless national treasures. This program presents an intriguing glimpse of Burmese life, ranging from washing the sacred Buddha at the Maha Muni Pagoda and the initiation of young Buddhist novices amid the ruins of Bagan to farming the amazing floating gardens of Lake Inle. Issues including Burma's 40-year civil war, the vital role of the railway and the cinema, and rampant smuggling are addressed as well.
Online
2007; 1998
4.

Laos [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of the Giants

Impoverished, sparsely populated, and still recovering from the Vietnam War, Laos exists on the edge of the abyss. This program considers the cultural and economic impact on Laotians and Hmong alike of initiatives designed to improve the country, such as the new highway being built by Swedish engineers. Although the regime's "reeducation camps" show no signs of being closed and antigovernment rebels continue to make travel dangerous, foreign tourism is being courted for the currency it can bring, while the country's rich spiritual life-expressed through the practices of Buddhism and animism-serenely continues.
Online
2007; 1998
5.

The State of World Population Report [electronic resource]

According to the latest statistics from the United Nations Population Fund, the momentum of world population growth has slowed. But does that mean the population boom is over? This program summarizes the results of the most recent State of World Population Report, highlighting key changes in fertility rates and family size, as well as demographic shifts and the implications of increased human longevity. A United Nations Production.
Online
2006; 2001
6.

Death and Dying in Varanasi [electronic resource]

Situated by the bank of the holy Ganges, Varanasi, also known as Kashi and Benares, is one of the oldest living cities in the world. Founded approximately 3,000 years ago, the city is the religious and cultural capital of India-considered by many to be the holiest place on earth. Every year Hindus in great number go there to die, believing that cremation in that place of renewal provides an immediate entry to heaven. Shot on location, this program celebrates life and death, examines the Hindu beliefs and rituals about life and death, and discusses how these forces have sustained Varanasi through history.
Online
2006; 2002
7.

A Living Goddess in Kathmandu [electronic resource]

The Kumari, a flesh-and-blood goddess, is revered by both Hindus and Buddhists in Nepal as a protector of the land and defender of all living beings. This program traces the mythological underpinnings of the Kumari and presents the living tradition of Kumari worship, including the Kumari selection, the secret preparation rituals, and Kumari-related festivals and ceremonies. It also discusses the relationship between the Kumari and the king.
Online
2006; 2002
8.

Paul Ehrlich and the Population Bomb [electronic resource]

The human population is likely to double by the middle of the 21st century, soaring past 10 billion people. How will all these people survive? Will there be enough resources to meet everyone's needs or will there be massive social upheaval, famine, and rampant pollution? These questions have been a consuming passion for biologist and environmental pioneer Paul Ehrlich, who set out decades ago to persuade the world that continued and unchecked population growth would upset the balance of nature and further widen the gap between developed and developing nations. Based on Ehrlich's best-selling book, The Population Bomb, this program features compelling archival footage from around the world, as well as interviews with Ehrlich, his colleagues, and his critics.
Online
2006; 1996
9.

Population Six Billion [electronic resource]

With 10,000 children born per hour, 80 million per year, the human population of the Earth surpassed the 6 billion mark in 1999. As resources of every kind get spread thinner and thinner, how will the impoverished peoples of Africa, Asia, and Latin America survive? And how much longer will it be before their urgent plight devastates Western society? This program thoroughly addresses the grim realities of life in third-world nations while providing case studies of population control initiatives in Vietnam, Uganda, and Mexico that include family planning, HIV/AIDS testing and counseling, and sex education.
Online
2006; 1999
10.

New York [electronic resource]: World's City

To describe New York City's cultural makeup, the best metaphor is a salad bowl rather than a melting pot. This program follows the Queens #7 subway line through a dazzling array of ethnic communities, each with its own distinct texture and flavor, illustrating demographic changes the city has undergone since the early 1990s. Less inclined to learn English and join mainstream society than previous immigrant generations, recently arrived New Yorkers are nevertheless part of a long-established pattern - which former Senator Bill Bradley (D-NJ) praises, while New York Senator Frank Padavan discusses fears that some conservative citizens harbor.
Online
2006; 2004
11.

Tokyo [electronic resource]: Neon City

Tokyo is one of the most technologically advanced cities on the planet, but Japan's low birth rate and the diversifying interests of its young people are causing Tokyo to rely increasingly on skilled immigrant labor. This program examines the implications of that change, gathering insightful commentary from a wide range of Japanese society about multiculturalism, racism, and interracial marriage. While the program cites one statistic saying 80 percent of Japanese citizens oppose foreign immigration, its anecdotal approach suggests more tolerance and sophistication. As the French CEO of the Nissan Corporation declares, Japan's involvement in globalization is here to stay.
Online
2006; 2004
12.

London [electronic resource]: Post-Imperial City

Defining the typical New Yorker has always been impossible; today, the definition of a Londoner is nearly as elusive. This program travels London's increasingly cosmopolitan neighborhoods, sorting through perspectives on immigration and resistance to it. Interviews with leaders and everyday citizens reveal distrust in several quarters; Lord Nazir Ahmed and East London Muslims cite examples of Islamophobia, and several Londoners express frustration with foreigners who refuse to conform. But a tour of the city's food markets reflects an astonishing diversity that is, according to many interview subjects, a source of newfound civic pride.
Online
2006; 2004
13.

Frankfurt [electronic resource]: Euro-City

An emerging high-tech focal point, Frankfurt has the largest foreign and immigrant population in continental Europe. This program studies the effects of that diversity, for Frankfurt specifically and within the larger context of German culture as it struggles with right-wing extremism. Rosi Wolf-Almanasreh of the Frankfurt Department for Multicultural Affairs focuses on the nation's anti-discrimination policies, while Frankfurt police officers, athletes, construction workers, and others detail experiences with diversity, both positive and negative. Contains mature themes associated with the city's sex industry.
Online
2006; 2004
14.

Changing Nature [electronic resource]: Population and Environment at a Crossroads

This program examines how urbanization, industrialization, and overreaching agriculture are depleting the Earth of its natural resources. Citing environmental changes in Morocco, Ghana, Ukraine, Mexico, and Vietnam, the program studies the impact of population growth and profiles organizations that respond to ecological crises stemming from such growth. With a focus on educational outreach efforts, particularly those for women and children, and the promotion of sustainable development in environmentally compromised regions, Changing Nature concludes that all ecological problems are essentially global and require global solutions.
Online
2006; 2001
15.

First Steps Into the Unknown [electronic resource]

Carved in stone or scratched in clay, the first maps appeared at least 5,000 years ago. This program chronicles the rise of geographical awareness-manifested not only in crude cartography, but also through word of mouth and narratives such as Homer's Odyssey and the Viking sagas. Clearly illustrating the forces behind navigational learning and excursions into the unknown, this program presents scholarly commentary on the abilities of Roman and medieval armies to travel across Europe, Christianity's Jerusalem-centric world view, and the emergence of Portugal as a leader in seafaring technology.
Online
2006; 2004
16.

Malawi [electronic resource]: Nation Going Hungry

Poverty, unstable government, and disadvantages in trade have virtually eliminated food security in Malawi. This program explores the African country's struggles on both a personal and national level, interviewing frustrated civil servants and impoverished citizens, and reflecting widespread despair over WTO policies and the government's inability to subsidize the agriculture of its own people. Highlighting the additional problems of environmental degradation and AIDS, the program offers a moving glimpse into human lives that revolve around one constant challenge: getting something to eat.
Online
2006; 2004
17.

India [electronic resource]: Working to End Child Labor

This program examines India's immense child labor problem and the fight against it. The video contrasts this nation's status as the world's largest democracy with the fact that, inside its borders, 80 million children work physically exhausting jobs for minuscule wages. Incorporating interviews with Shanta Sinha, founder of the organization known as MVF, the video illustrates how the group coordinates community action against the exploitation of young people and creates bridge schools that help children with the transition from work to education. It also makes a strong case that child labor increases poverty levels.
Online
2006; 2004
18.

From Somewhere to Nowhere [electronic resource]: China's Internal Migrant Workers

High-density population centers of enormous size are springing up in China with dizzying speed, and with them comes an increased demand for migrant workers in construction, manufacturing, and mining. Through still images by Andreas Seibert and documentary footage by Villi Hermann, this program travels throughout China to vividly capture the experiences of these mingong, tens of millions on the move from the countryside to the cities in the too-often misplaced hope of building a better life for themselves and their families. An intriguing angle on urbanization fueled by explosive economic growth-and a moving composite portrait of laborers who typically toil in obscurity.
Online
2010; 2009
19.

Modern Slavery [electronic resource]: Debt Bondage and Child Soldiers

Indentured servitude, however dehumanizing, played a role in the colonization and development of early America. But its 21st-century incarnation, the practice of debt bondage, contributes virtually nothing to the common good of southern Asia. This program examines the plight of workers in India's rural areas, exposing the conditions in which they toil to pay off staggering personal debts. More tragic still are the ranks of child soldiers forced to fight in African militias and armies. Viewers meet Moses, who was kidnapped as a boy and absorbed into Uganda's LRA insurgency. The film shows him going through the process of shedding his soldier's ways, rejoining his family, and trying to reclaim his life.
Online
2010; 2008
20.

How Many People Can Live on Planet Earth? [electronic resource]

Thirst, starvation, claustrophobia-all three await the whole of humanity, if global population and consumption rates continue unchanged. This program explores the looming crisis in practical terms, measuring as accurately as possible our planet's capacity for human habitation. Host Sir David Attenborough guides viewers through the core problems of water scarcity, shortsighted agricultural policies, and alarming birth and death statistics compiled by the United Nations. Expert guests include population expert and London School of Economics professor Timothy Dyson; Nature Conservancy Sustainable Waters Program director Brian Richter; and NASA analyst Dr. Molly Brown.
Online
2010; 2009