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1.

The State of World Population Report [electronic resource]

According to the latest statistics from the United Nations Population Fund, the momentum of world population growth has slowed. But does that mean the population boom is over? This program summarizes the results of the most recent State of World Population Report, highlighting key changes in fertility rates and family size, as well as demographic shifts and the implications of increased human longevity. A United Nations Production.
Online
2006; 2001
2.

Paul Ehrlich and the Population Bomb [electronic resource]

The human population is likely to double by the middle of the 21st century, soaring past 10 billion people. How will all these people survive? Will there be enough resources to meet everyone's needs or will there be massive social upheaval, famine, and rampant pollution? These questions have been a consuming passion for biologist and environmental pioneer Paul Ehrlich, who set out decades ago to persuade the world that continued and unchecked population growth would upset the balance of nature and further widen the gap between developed and developing nations. Based on Ehrlich's best-selling book, The Population Bomb, this program features compelling archival footage from around the world, as well as interviews with Ehrlich, his colleagues, and his critics.
Online
2006; 1996
3.

Population Six Billion [electronic resource]

With 10,000 children born per hour, 80 million per year, the human population of the Earth surpassed the 6 billion mark in 1999. As resources of every kind get spread thinner and thinner, how will the impoverished peoples of Africa, Asia, and Latin America survive? And how much longer will it be before their urgent plight devastates Western society? This program thoroughly addresses the grim realities of life in third-world nations while providing case studies of population control initiatives in Vietnam, Uganda, and Mexico that include family planning, HIV/AIDS testing and counseling, and sex education.
Online
2006; 1999
4.

New York [electronic resource]: World's City

To describe New York City's cultural makeup, the best metaphor is a salad bowl rather than a melting pot. This program follows the Queens #7 subway line through a dazzling array of ethnic communities, each with its own distinct texture and flavor, illustrating demographic changes the city has undergone since the early 1990s. Less inclined to learn English and join mainstream society than previous immigrant generations, recently arrived New Yorkers are nevertheless part of a long-established pattern - which former Senator Bill Bradley (D-NJ) praises, while New York Senator Frank Padavan discusses fears that some conservative citizens harbor.
Online
2006; 2004
5.

Tokyo [electronic resource]: Neon City

Tokyo is one of the most technologically advanced cities on the planet, but Japan's low birth rate and the diversifying interests of its young people are causing Tokyo to rely increasingly on skilled immigrant labor. This program examines the implications of that change, gathering insightful commentary from a wide range of Japanese society about multiculturalism, racism, and interracial marriage. While the program cites one statistic saying 80 percent of Japanese citizens oppose foreign immigration, its anecdotal approach suggests more tolerance and sophistication. As the French CEO of the Nissan Corporation declares, Japan's involvement in globalization is here to stay.
Online
2006; 2004
6.

London [electronic resource]: Post-Imperial City

Defining the typical New Yorker has always been impossible; today, the definition of a Londoner is nearly as elusive. This program travels London's increasingly cosmopolitan neighborhoods, sorting through perspectives on immigration and resistance to it. Interviews with leaders and everyday citizens reveal distrust in several quarters; Lord Nazir Ahmed and East London Muslims cite examples of Islamophobia, and several Londoners express frustration with foreigners who refuse to conform. But a tour of the city's food markets reflects an astonishing diversity that is, according to many interview subjects, a source of newfound civic pride.
Online
2006; 2004
7.

Frankfurt [electronic resource]: Euro-City

An emerging high-tech focal point, Frankfurt has the largest foreign and immigrant population in continental Europe. This program studies the effects of that diversity, for Frankfurt specifically and within the larger context of German culture as it struggles with right-wing extremism. Rosi Wolf-Almanasreh of the Frankfurt Department for Multicultural Affairs focuses on the nation's anti-discrimination policies, while Frankfurt police officers, athletes, construction workers, and others detail experiences with diversity, both positive and negative. Contains mature themes associated with the city's sex industry.
Online
2006; 2004
8.

Globalization Is Good [electronic resource]

Controversial writer Johan Norberg argues forcefully for one side of the globalization debate. In this program he examines three developing countries and how they fit into that debate, building a case for deregulation, the abolishment of subsidies and tariffs, and a long-term view of industrialization. He frankly defends the use of sweatshop labor, through which Taiwan has cultivated a vigorous, targeted manufacturing sector and transformed agrarian poverty into affluence. Praising Vietnam for following the same path and criticizing Kenya as an unfortunate example of isolationism, Norberg's assertions compose a powerful catalyst for classroom discussion.
Online
2006; 2003
9.

Changing Nature [electronic resource]: Population and Environment at a Crossroads

This program examines how urbanization, industrialization, and overreaching agriculture are depleting the Earth of its natural resources. Citing environmental changes in Morocco, Ghana, Ukraine, Mexico, and Vietnam, the program studies the impact of population growth and profiles organizations that respond to ecological crises stemming from such growth. With a focus on educational outreach efforts, particularly those for women and children, and the promotion of sustainable development in environmentally compromised regions, Changing Nature concludes that all ecological problems are essentially global and require global solutions.
Online
2006; 2001
10.

From Somewhere to Nowhere [electronic resource]: China's Internal Migrant Workers

High-density population centers of enormous size are springing up in China with dizzying speed, and with them comes an increased demand for migrant workers in construction, manufacturing, and mining. Through still images by Andreas Seibert and documentary footage by Villi Hermann, this program travels throughout China to vividly capture the experiences of these mingong, tens of millions on the move from the countryside to the cities in the too-often misplaced hope of building a better life for themselves and their families. An intriguing angle on urbanization fueled by explosive economic growth-and a moving composite portrait of laborers who typically toil in obscurity.
Online
2010; 2009
11.

Modern Slavery [electronic resource]: Debt Bondage and Child Soldiers

Indentured servitude, however dehumanizing, played a role in the colonization and development of early America. But its 21st-century incarnation, the practice of debt bondage, contributes virtually nothing to the common good of southern Asia. This program examines the plight of workers in India's rural areas, exposing the conditions in which they toil to pay off staggering personal debts. More tragic still are the ranks of child soldiers forced to fight in African militias and armies. Viewers meet Moses, who was kidnapped as a boy and absorbed into Uganda's LRA insurgency. The film shows him going through the process of shedding his soldier's ways, rejoining his family, and trying to reclaim his life.
Online
2010; 2008
12.

How Many People Can Live on Planet Earth? [electronic resource]

Thirst, starvation, claustrophobia-all three await the whole of humanity, if global population and consumption rates continue unchanged. This program explores the looming crisis in practical terms, measuring as accurately as possible our planet's capacity for human habitation. Host Sir David Attenborough guides viewers through the core problems of water scarcity, shortsighted agricultural policies, and alarming birth and death statistics compiled by the United Nations. Expert guests include population expert and London School of Economics professor Timothy Dyson; Nature Conservancy Sustainable Waters Program director Brian Richter; and NASA analyst Dr. Molly Brown.
Online
2010; 2009
13.

Brazil [electronic resource]: Urban Planning Challenges

A city shouldn't be a problem, says Jaime Lerner, the former mayor of Curitiba. "It should be a solution." This program explores innovative planning, engineering, and conservation at work in the Brazilian metropolis as it transcends many of the problems plaguing other South American cities. The film spotlights fully modernized public transportation and recycling systems, a "Citizenship Street" zoning pattern that reduces high-volume traffic, an oil collection program that transforms used cooking grease into biofuel, and other successful initiatives. But the need for a waste-for-food exchange program demonstrates that even Curitiba must still contend with poverty and other social challenges.
Online
2010; 2009
14.

Conflict on a Local Scale [electronic resource]

This program examines types of conflict that can occur at the local level, whether that locality is a single town, a region, or an entire country. After generally addressing armed conflict-different types of war, where they tend to proliferate, and kinds of weaponry used-Conflict on a Local Scale illustrates unarmed conflict through five examples. They include a clash of recreational interests in Britain's Lake District; in Cambodia, the forced eviction of residents from confiscated oceanfront real estate; the potential expansion of England's Heathrow Airport, which would necessitate the leveling of an entire town; tensions over inadequate water supplies in Ukraine, an instance of cooperative conflict resolution; and a municipal planning crisis involving a supermarket chain in the Br [...]
Online
2010; 2009
15.

Global Conflict [electronic resource]

This program-a valuable tool for introducing the concepts of energy security, antiterrorism, and managing change at the global level-identifies the roots of violent conflict by way of specific examples. Through discussion of territorial conflicts (India/Pakistan, Israel/PLO), genocides (Rwanda, Srebrenica), terrorism (al Qaeda, IRA, ETA), and hybridized violence such as that found in Sudan, Global Conflict makes the case that an understanding of the sources of conflict, combined with the free exchange of information internationally, is the key to reducing strife at all levels.
Online
2010; 2009
16.

Consequences of Conflict [electronic resource]

The consequences of armed conflict are complex and long-lasting. Using Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan as points of departure, this program examines some of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of conflicts at the national and international levels. Topics include the pernicious phenomenon of child soldiers; the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons; thorny issues related to aid money and international assistance; the enduring scars of war on the landscape; the repercussions of ruined infrastructural elements such as power grids; and the unquantifiable losses-the what-could-have-beens-that inevitably occur when a nation's money is diverted from education and health care.
Online
2010; 2009
17.

Diane Sawyer in China Video Clip Collection [electronic resource]

China's global influence has grown enormously since the turn of the new century. Now the second-largest economy in the world, its citizens are buying up consumer goods both domestically and from abroad in record numbers. In this collection of 12 ABC News segments, anchor Diane Sawyer travels from Beijing to Shanghai exploring life in the Asian nation and the part the U.S. has played in shaping its economic initiatives. Clip duration ranges from 2 to 5 minutes.
Online
2010
18.

Emerging Superpower [electronic resource]: Booming Bangalore

Almost every major bank and electronics company on the globe has an office-or posh, sprawling campus-in Bangalore. How did the city become a world-class business center, and in what ways has its development impacted the people living there? This program looks at the factors contributing to Bangalore's success, the complications of rapid growth, and the impact of a new middle class on a traditional society. With severe traffic jams, limited access to basic utilities, and new demands placed on family life, Bangalore is addressing both social and infrastructure problems so that it can retain the international trade it has attracted.
Online
2009
19.

Rural Challenges [electronic resource]: Case Studies From South India

India is the planet's biggest producer of over 22 different cash crops, making its agricultural economy the second largest in the world. Why then does most of its rural population live below subsistence level, relying on foreign NGOs for aid? This program looks at reasons why working villagers remain in poverty, including government policies that direct funding away from development and towards the urban business boom. Viewers meet several struggling families and learn how microcredit programs are helping them boost their household income.
Online
2009
20.

Enjoy Your Meal! [electronic resource]: How Food Changes the World

Exploring the aisles of a Dutch grocery store, this program clearly demonstrates that globalization has made almost any food item, no matter how exotic or remote, available to the Western consumer. But the film also shows the downside of that new global access, tracing specific foods to their countries of origin and revealing the impact on indigenous communities and ecosystems. Viewers witness the burning of Mehinaku forestland in Brazil in order to cultivate soya crops; the creation of inland shrimp farms in the Philippines at the expense of fragile mangrove habitats; and the mass production of sugar peas, green beans, and other vegetables-made possible by low-wage Kenyan labor. A powerful visual study that is sure to spark further discussions of food security and sustainability.
Online
2010