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1.

Death and Dying in Varanasi [electronic resource]

Situated by the bank of the holy Ganges, Varanasi, also known as Kashi and Benares, is one of the oldest living cities in the world. Founded approximately 3,000 years ago, the city is the religious and cultural capital of India-considered by many to be the holiest place on earth. Every year Hindus in great number go there to die, believing that cremation in that place of renewal provides an immediate entry to heaven. Shot on location, this program celebrates life and death, examines the Hindu beliefs and rituals about life and death, and discusses how these forces have sustained Varanasi through history.
Online
2006; 2002
2.

A Living Goddess in Kathmandu [electronic resource]

The Kumari, a flesh-and-blood goddess, is revered by both Hindus and Buddhists in Nepal as a protector of the land and defender of all living beings. This program traces the mythological underpinnings of the Kumari and presents the living tradition of Kumari worship, including the Kumari selection, the secret preparation rituals, and Kumari-related festivals and ceremonies. It also discusses the relationship between the Kumari and the king.
Online
2006; 2002
3.

Mysteries of the Landscape [electronic resource]

The Earth's surface gave shape to the early cosmologies of almost every culture. This program explores that universal phenomenon, traveling across the globe to examine the role of geology in religion and myth. From the revered Uluru/Ayers Rock in Australia to Crete's Diktaeon cave-according to tradition, the birthplace of Zeus-the video explains the spiritual significance of numerous sites while connecting them with historical events and scientific concepts. Sacred, monumental additions to the landscape are also featured, including the Mayan pyramids, the stone dolmens of Europe, the dragon trees of Tenerife, and the Meteora monasteries atop the Pindus Mountains.
Online
2006; 2005
4.

Water and Its Powers [electronic resource]

Water may be the world's hardest-working religious symbol, representing life, death, purification, destruction, and countless other ideas. This program studies the spiritual properties of water and the myriad ways in which humanity has regarded the precious substance over the millennia. Establishing a link between climate and the evolution of god-images, the video explores the notion of the angry deity who punishes with water-a concept prevailing in arid regions and informing flood myths across the globe. The program also illustrates the power of the river-as a source of life, and as a route into the underworld-highlighting the cultural and historical importance of the Nile, the Ganges, and the mythical Styx.
Online
2006; 2005
5.

Animals as Divinities [electronic resource]

Prehistoric art often renders animals in spiritual, even divine, form-but primitive beast images can also reflect a degree of humanity. This program sifts through the complexity of the animal-god concept, identifying the place of the lion, the giraffe, the wolf, the elephant, and many other creatures in a wide range of myths and religions. With detailed observations of sculpture, carvings, and statuary-including Native American totem poles, European gargoyles and grotesques, and Egyptian mummies honoring the cat-headed goddess Ubasti-the video demonstrates an age-old interconnection between our reverence for nature and our need to determine our status in it.
Online
2007; 2005