You searched for:

Subject
:
Human Ecology
x
Subject
:
Educational Films
x
Subject
:
International Relations
x
11 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Malawi [electronic resource]: Nation Going Hungry

Poverty, unstable government, and disadvantages in trade have virtually eliminated food security in Malawi. This program explores the African country's struggles on both a personal and national level, interviewing frustrated civil servants and impoverished citizens, and reflecting widespread despair over WTO policies and the government's inability to subsidize the agriculture of its own people. Highlighting the additional problems of environmental degradation and AIDS, the program offers a moving glimpse into human lives that revolve around one constant challenge: getting something to eat.
Online
2006; 2004
2.

India [electronic resource]: Working to End Child Labor

This program examines India's immense child labor problem and the fight against it. The video contrasts this nation's status as the world's largest democracy with the fact that, inside its borders, 80 million children work physically exhausting jobs for minuscule wages. Incorporating interviews with Shanta Sinha, founder of the organization known as MVF, the video illustrates how the group coordinates community action against the exploitation of young people and creates bridge schools that help children with the transition from work to education. It also makes a strong case that child labor increases poverty levels.
Online
2006; 2004
3.

The Future of Food [electronic resource]: A Looming Crisis

According to Tim Lang, Professor of Food Policy at London's City University, future wars may be fought specifically over agricultural resources. Given the present volatility of food prices and the riots they provoked in 2008, his theory seems to be on the mark. This program assesses the potential for a global food crisis as it guides viewers through issues involving climate change, oil consumption, biofuel development, fish stock depletion, and other topics. A Rift Valley herder discusses drought in Africa; a Cuban scholar details the impact of the Soviet collapse on food transportation in his country; an Indian farmer reports being pressured into planting jatropha instead of food crops; and Senegalese fishermen lament the intrusion of Western corporate interests. A Blakeway Televisi [...]
Online
2010; 2009
4.

Global Conflict [electronic resource]

This program-a valuable tool for introducing the concepts of energy security, antiterrorism, and managing change at the global level-identifies the roots of violent conflict by way of specific examples. Through discussion of territorial conflicts (India/Pakistan, Israel/PLO), genocides (Rwanda, Srebrenica), terrorism (al Qaeda, IRA, ETA), and hybridized violence such as that found in Sudan, Global Conflict makes the case that an understanding of the sources of conflict, combined with the free exchange of information internationally, is the key to reducing strife at all levels.
Online
2010; 2009
5.

Consequences of Conflict [electronic resource]

The consequences of armed conflict are complex and long-lasting. Using Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan as points of departure, this program examines some of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of conflicts at the national and international levels. Topics include the pernicious phenomenon of child soldiers; the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons; thorny issues related to aid money and international assistance; the enduring scars of war on the landscape; the repercussions of ruined infrastructural elements such as power grids; and the unquantifiable losses-the what-could-have-beens-that inevitably occur when a nation's money is diverted from education and health care.
Online
2010; 2009
6.

A Changing World [electronic resource]

According to some forecasts, the Arctic Ocean will be seasonally ice-free by the summer of 2013 - a nightmare that is driving environmentalists to find ways to minimize the damage. But for energy prospectors, climate change brings new opportunities as more and more deposits of oil, gas, and minerals become accessible. This program focuses on competing interests racing to control Arctic resources and territories. Dr. Ruth Jackson, from Nova Scotia's Bedford Institute of Oceanography, heads the team mapping the seabed in support of Canada's claims. As the work of Dr. Jackson and other researchers shows, scientists as well as nations must contend with the Arctic's icy politics. In one scene, a Canadian-led venture is thwarted when a deal to hire a Russian icebreaker falls through.
Online
2009
7.

An Uncertain Future [electronic resource]

There are two different Arctics. One is the storybook land of snow and polar bears, while the other has become a breeding ground of petroleum plants and pipelines. Can the two coexist? What fate awaits the natural Arctic if the technological one expands without restraint? This program explores those questions as it follows research taking place on Bylot Island, home to a portion of Sirmilik National Park, in Canada's Nunavut Territory. Here, scientists have come every summer for the past 20 years to measure the impact of climate change on snowy owls, lemmings, snow geese, and Arctic foxes. Here, they have discovered that even tiny, hardy plants are being affected, causing a cascade of changes through the ecosystem.
Online
2009
8.

The Arctic Passage [electronic resource]

Each year the number of ships traversing the Northwest Passage rises, raising concerns among local and indigenous communities. As this program illustrates, the trend shows no sign of stopping, since what were once extremely dangerous waters are becoming more and more accessible to global commerce. Ports such as Churchill, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, and Murmansk, near Russia's border with Norway and Finland, expect to see business and maritime activity grow for years to come. But with the increases in traffic come higher risks-in particular for the Inuit, who have called the Arctic home for thousands of years and are troubled by escalating threats to their traditional way of life.
Online
2009
9.

Food for All [electronic resource]: Global Agriculture and the Developing World

Satisfying one's hunger is a primal act which most Westerners never connect to global issues. But the diets and farming systems of wealthy countries can be directly linked to starvation in the underdeveloped world. This program sheds light on the international tragedy of hunger and malnutrition, emphasizing that the problem is one of distribution, not production. Filmed in Asia, South America, and sub-Saharan Africa, the film shows how geopolitics, economic isolation, regional conflicts, and lack of infrastructure render poor countries unable to feed their own people. Biotechnology, land use priorities, government corruption, the fast food industry, and the vicious cycle of child hunger are all featured topics. Contains scenes of breastfeeding.
Online
2008; 2007
10.

Nicaragua [electronic resource]: Turning Away From Violence

In Nicaragua, a growing awareness of domestic violence and its consequences has spurred grassroots activism. This program documents the efforts of two groups, the Xochitl-Acatl Center and the Association of Men Against Violence, both of which confront gender and sexual abuse. Arguing that economic and political oppression influence male tendencies to exercise physical authority within the home, the video describes educational campaigns that build financial self-sufficiency and self-esteem in both men and women. Interviews with participants feature more than one success story.
Online
2006; 2004
11.

Guatemala [electronic resource]: Human Price of Coffee

Coffee is second only to oil as the world's most valuable traded commodity, but small-scale producers rarely profit from it. This program reveals the hardship and uncertainty faced by coffee farmers in Guatemala, and how many are taking steps to obtain better prices and build better lives. Analyzing the country's traumatic history and the lingering effects of its civil war, the video sheds light on the reluctance of some citizens to organize for fear of persecution and murder. The video clearly demonstrates that behind every pound of coffee lies a story of human struggle.
Online
2006; 2004