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1.

The Pacific [electronic resource]: Biodiversity and the Protection of Coral Reefs

Virtually every reef system in the world is endangered, and the island nations of the South Pacific provide some of the most troubling examples. This program examines the uncertain future of tropical offshore ecosystems using the French collectivity of New Caledonia as a case study. Viewers accompany lagoon protection crew members as they patrol fragile marine reserves by boat; an itinerant researcher who describes frequent legal conflicts between tribal interests and environmental regulations; and outreach personnel working with Kanak and Melanesian leaders to reduce traditional hillside burns, which lead to high sediment levels in lagoons.
Online
2010; 2009
2.

The Arctic Circle [electronic resource]: On Thin Ice

For thousands of years, the only threat to polar bears came from humans. Nothing has changed-except now it is fossil fuel consumption, not spears and guns, that pushes Ursus maritimus toward extinction. Depicting the hapless species as the proverbial canary in a coal mine, this program studies the intensifying impact of climate change on the Arctic region. Viewers learn how the entire Arctic food chain, from tiny zooplankton to the ringed seal to the mighty polar bear, is under stress from ice depletion-and how severe drops in sea-ice thickness are related to the alarming appearance of meltwater channels and crevasse-like pits across glaciers in Norway and Greenland. Animated views of these anomalies help illustrate what is happening to the frozen landscape.
Online
2010; 2009
3.

Tropical Storms [electronic resource]: Bangladesh's Cyclone Aila

With extraordinary footage shot during and after Severe Cyclonic Storm Aila, this program looks at the causes and effects of the violent weather event in Bangladesh. Viewers learn how cyclones take shape and develop, witness scenes of Aila striking coastal areas, and explore the social, economic, and ecological consequences through expert commentary and first-hand accounts. The film returns to specific areas a year after the storm and provides examples of how NGOs and government agencies are working together to reduce both the short- and long-term impact of cyclones through better monitoring, predictions, preparation, disaster relief, and poverty alleviation strategies. Eye-catching graphics help explain scientific concepts.
Online
2011
4.

Flooding in Bangladesh [electronic resource]: Causes, Impacts, and Management

Taking viewers deep inside a devastated landscape, this program examines physical forces directly tied to flooding in Bangladesh as well as the broader causes of such disasters, including climate change. It also explores the social, economic, and environmental impact of intense flooding through the personal accounts of people living by major rivers and on Bangladesh's char lands, areas built up from river sediment. Examples of flood management strategies are explored, with a look at the pros and cons of hard and soft engineering. Additionally, the film shows how NGOs are working with flood-affected communities to reduce the developing world's vulnerability to future floods.
Online
2011
5.

The Weather Video Clip Collection [electronic resource]

The weather-a phenomenon clearly beyond human control!-is nevertheless a topic of fascination to people the world over. A combination of high-quality film footage and detailed animations, this collection of 48 video clips (30 seconds to 2 minutes each) discusses Earth's atmosphere, precipitation, meteorology, climates, the environment, and pollution. Video clips include: Earth's Atmosphere-Introduction; The Atmosphere; Atmospheric Pressure; The Movement of Air Masses; Wind; Precipitation-Introduction; Humidity; Cloud Formation; Identifying Clouds; Dew and Fog; Rainbows; Lightning and Thunder; Meteorology-Introduction; Measurement Instruments; Measuring the Temperature; Balloons and Radar; Geostationary Satellites; Polar-Orbiting Satellites; Weather Maps; Climates-Introduction; The S [...]
Online
2011; 2004
6.

Amazon [electronic resource]: Land of the Flooded Forest

When seasonal rains sweep across South America, the Amazon River and its tributaries overflow their banks to create an ecosystem unlike any other-a place where, for six months out of each year, land-dwellers and water-dwellers mingle. This program joins an expert Amazon biologist in a journey into the flooded forests of the Amazon Basin to film dolphins navigating through treetops, a male "water monkey" releasing a cloud of babies from the nest in its mouth, and the usually lethargic three-toed sloth swimming agilely among branches. The video also explores the depletion of the region's natural resources, both by indigenous inhabitants struggling to survive and by outsiders eager to clear land for mass crop production.
Online
2009; 2002
7.

Natural Allies [electronic resource]

Have Earth's vibrant waterways-its streams, rivers, lakes, and oceans-become delivery systems for pollutants and poison? This program points to signs that toxic substances are overwhelming our planet's aquatic ecosystems. Viewers encounter many of the causes for this concern, including a radical decrease in frog populations, distressed marine mammals in estuary habitats, and disturbing changes in reef biodiversity.
Online
2010; 2004
8.

Six Degrees Could Change the World [electronic resource]

Based on Mark Lynas's Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet, this program explores the theory that Earth's average temperature could rise six degrees Celsius by the year 2100. One poignant degree at a time, the consequences of rising temperatures on Greenland's ice sheet and Himalayan glaciers, tropical coral reefs and the Amazon rainforest, and elsewhere across five continents are illustrated. In addition, some of the world's top climate researchers present existing technologies and remedies that can help in the battle to cool off the global thermometer. An alarming preview of a potentially catastrophic future-and a global call to action!
Online
2009; 2007
9.

Climate Change [electronic resource]: Hot Times in the City

What are the health implications of global warming in urban areas? This program examines the medical repercussions of environmental change and crisis in Canada. Environmental and disaster relief experts, such as Steven King of Sustainable Environment Management and John Saunders of the Red Cross, discuss the risks, including heat stroke and water-borne diseases, associated with rising temperatures and severe weather in Toronto and Halifax. Then, the impact that rising sea levels could have on Vancouver and accompanying health threats are explained by engineers and landscape architects, like Robert Gonzales, a local director of engineering and public works.
Online
2009; 2007
10.

Smog [electronic resource]: Sweet Smell of Success?

For most of a century, industrial and automotive smoke were equated with progress and prosperity. But the cost in human health has been devastatingly high, particularly in developing countries. In this program, Devra Davis, author of When Smoke Ran Like Water; Peter Brimblecombe, executive editor of Atmospheric Environment; and others use examples such as smog-related deaths in Donora, Pennsylvania, in 1939 and London in 1952 to address the causes and effects of air pollution. The Ruhr Valley, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Calcutta, and Durban, South Africa, are also discussed. Improvements via legislation and emissions standards are touched upon as well.
Online
2006; 2005
11.

Atmospheric Hole [electronic resource]: History of Ozone Layer

Freon was a refrigeration breakthrough in 1928. It took 45 years for scientists to recognize its dangers, and another 15 for the international community to enact a worldwide ban on all CFC gases. This program illustrates that long process of problem-solving and political action, focusing on the work of Nobel-winning chemists F. Sherwood Rowland and Mario Molina and how their discoveries led to the 1989 Montreal Protocol-which may well have prevented catastrophic depletion of the ozone layer. Interviews with Rowland, climatologist Robert Watson, and EPA official Stephen Anderson illuminate one of the most important environmental sagas of the last century.
Online
2006
12.

Dirty Little Secrets [electronic resource]: Impact of Fine Particle Pollution

To most people, air pollution is a global issue. But what about the air we breathe every day-on the street, at work, and in our homes? This program studies fine particle air pollution and its public health hazards. Using detailed graphics that magnify a compound 100,000 times, the video explains the concept of fine particles and their ability to penetrate and disable cells-clearly illustrating the impact on human lung, heart, and brain tissue. Interviews with chemists and health experts who have studied air-borne toxins for years, combined with experiments measuring fine-particle exposure in urban areas, suggest a need for more monitoring and regulation to protect the public.
Online
2006
13.

The NewsHour [electronic resource]: Environmental Science

Whether they arise from human causes or forces within planet Earth itself, natural disasters threaten life and civilization with what seems to be growing frequency. This album of NewsHour segments studies troubling developments in marine, arctic, wetland, and urban environments - highlighting research opportunities that may help prevent future catastrophes. Coral reef decay, Everglades habitat loss, polar ice disappearance, and global warming are all analyzed. In addition, the program looks at earthquake prediction, hurricane and tornado tracking, air pollution monitoring, tsunami warning systems, and the cleanup of toxic flood sediment in New Orleans.
Online
2007; 2005
14.

Portrait of a Coast [electronic resource]: 21st Century the Survival of America's Shores

Over two decades ago, the original version of this program depicted the effects of wind, waves, and tides on the coastline of southeastern Massachusetts. Revised and updated for the 21st century, this edition takes a new look at the problem of erosion along America's shores, emphasizing the impact of climate change and sea level rise on our coasts. Continuing its case study of Cape Cod and the surrounding region, the film shows how beaches and dunes are formed and migrate, shaped by wind, waves, and the movement of sand-all in the wider context of global warming and human development. Also included: a hard look at the future of America's once-pristine marine settings.
Online
2009; 2008
15.

Treasured Places in Peril [electronic resource]: Global Warming Impacts on the Southeast

Climate change is a global phenomenon, but its effects are most clearly demonstrated on a regional level. This program connects the local and planetary aspects of global warming through environmental case studies, focusing on North Carolina's Outer Banks, South Carolina's coastal areas, and Florida's Everglades and Keys. Long-time residents of each state describe ecological changes they have observed in their lifetimes, while researchers and activists provide additional commentary. Dr. William Schlesinger of Duke University, Angela Viney of the South Carolina Wildlife Federation, and Superintendent Dan Kimball of the Everglades National Park are featured. Also included is a slide show highlighting the locations studied.
Online
2008; 2007
16.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Al Gore, 15 Ways to Avert a Climate Crisis

With the same humor and humanity he exuded in the Oscar-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore - former vice president and Nobel Peace Prize-winner - spells out 15 ways that individuals can address climate change immediately, from buying a hybrid car to inventing a new, hotter "brand name" for global warming. In this TEDTalk Gore is "easygoing, knowledgeable, and funny," says Rolling Stone.
Online
2006
17.

Coastal Dunes [electronic resource]

At ground level, shallow seas, broad beaches, dunes, and waterlogged hollows seem to comprise a chaotic environment. In fact, there is order and form, produced by the interaction of wind, vegetation, and moving sand. Because sand dunes develop rapidly, the development of a landform can be observed. Measuring wind velocity demonstrates how saltation, sand movement, and erosion happen. The program demonstrates the morphology of dune development and how the complex interaction between it and the vegetation-soil system can be observed and measured. The program also demonstrates how precarious the balance is between the various factors, and how slight changes-including the use of the area by man-can destroy large parts of the system.
Online
2009; 1982
18.

Parks Monitor Noise to Protect Nature, Environment [electronic resource]

Performing acoustical measurements of artificial noise helps safeguard wildlife.
Online
2012