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1.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009
2.

Niger [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of Noma

Noma is an acute oral infection that attacks young, malnourished children. If left untreated-which, tragically, is often the case in Africa-it devours bone tissue and permanently disfigures its victims. This unflinching program studies the impact of the pitiless disease and will help viewers assess the ability and readiness of the international community to combat the suffering. Graphic scenes of school-age noma patients are interwoven with commentary from medical experts and heartbreaking accounts from family members who have watched as sons, daughters, and grandchildren succumb to the sickness. The film also describes low-cost interventions that could keep noma from spreading, if resources are made available.
Online
2010; 2009
3.

Paraguay [electronic resource]: Soya and Pesticides

When an 11-year-old Paraguayan boy named Silvino Talavera died from pesticide poisoning in 2003, his name became a rallying cry in the fight against intensive soya production. This program recounts the tragedy and the legal, political, and economic impact of "agritoxins" in Latin America. Opening with a poetically filmed reenactment and moving on to feature key players in the story, the film includes an interview with Fernando Lugo-a Catholic priest whose election to Paraguay's presidency shifted policy away from large-scale agricultural interests toward more populist causes. Land redistribution and genetic modification emerge as central topics in this look at a controversy that is far from over.
Online
2010; 2009
4.

Chad [electronic resource]: Hydraulic Projects and Peace

Characterized as an LDC or Least Developed Country, the nation of Chad wrestles with drought, population growth, and resulting tensions between farmers and herders. This program investigates hydraulic projects and mediation initiatives that are fostering relationships between Chad's food growers and its nomadic, livestock-centered cultures. Overviewing the basic causes of Chadian land disputes and competition for water sources as well as failed modernization schemes proposed during the 1960s, the film explores new solutions based on recognizing traditional agriculture and natural migration routes. Viewers witness "sit-down" talks between farmers and herders that could help prevent regional conflicts from flaring up.
Online
2010; 2009
5.

Laos [electronic resource]: Culture, Development, and Heritage Protection

In Luang Prabang, amidst the customary begging of Buddhist monks and the irksome giddiness of camera-wielding tourists, history lies waiting on street after street of traditional architecture. This program takes viewers into the heart of the Laotian city, where builders and bureaucrats contest the fate of land, houses, and public structures while traditional artisans and architects work to preserve an ancient heritage. Highlighting cooperation between the city planning office and French investment programs, the film examines the impact of illegal construction, colonialism, and new building regulations on the cultural landscape. A renovated hospital, a roof tile production center, and wetland development are among several specific topics.
Online
2010; 2009
6.

Brazil [electronic resource]: Urban Planning Challenges

A city shouldn't be a problem, says Jaime Lerner, the former mayor of Curitiba. "It should be a solution." This program explores innovative planning, engineering, and conservation at work in the Brazilian metropolis as it transcends many of the problems plaguing other South American cities. The film spotlights fully modernized public transportation and recycling systems, a "Citizenship Street" zoning pattern that reduces high-volume traffic, an oil collection program that transforms used cooking grease into biofuel, and other successful initiatives. But the need for a waste-for-food exchange program demonstrates that even Curitiba must still contend with poverty and other social challenges.
Online
2010; 2009
7.

Madagascar [electronic resource]: Agro-Ecology

Illegal deforestation, slash-and-burn practices, poverty, land disputes-these are among the many problems associated with farming in Madagascar. This program guides viewers through the real-world challenges of building sustainable agriculture in the country. Outlining reasons why many growers are unable or unwilling to leave outmoded techniques behind, the film visits community offices that support local farmers in organizing, obtaining microfinancing, and increasing efficiency. Erosion, soil management, irrigation and drainage, and the development of mixed farming-or combining crop cultivation and animal herding-are examined. Ecologists, agriculture experts, and a traveling veterinarian add commentary.
Online
2010; 2009
8.

The Future of Food [electronic resource]: A Looming Crisis

According to Tim Lang, Professor of Food Policy at London's City University, future wars may be fought specifically over agricultural resources. Given the present volatility of food prices and the riots they provoked in 2008, his theory seems to be on the mark. This program assesses the potential for a global food crisis as it guides viewers through issues involving climate change, oil consumption, biofuel development, fish stock depletion, and other topics. A Rift Valley herder discusses drought in Africa; a Cuban scholar details the impact of the Soviet collapse on food transportation in his country; an Indian farmer reports being pressured into planting jatropha instead of food crops; and Senegalese fishermen lament the intrusion of Western corporate interests. A Blakeway Televisi [...]
Online
2010; 2009
9.

Emerging Superpower [electronic resource]: Booming Bangalore

Almost every major bank and electronics company on the globe has an office-or posh, sprawling campus-in Bangalore. How did the city become a world-class business center, and in what ways has its development impacted the people living there? This program looks at the factors contributing to Bangalore's success, the complications of rapid growth, and the impact of a new middle class on a traditional society. With severe traffic jams, limited access to basic utilities, and new demands placed on family life, Bangalore is addressing both social and infrastructure problems so that it can retain the international trade it has attracted.
Online
2009
10.

Rural Challenges [electronic resource]: Case Studies From South India

India is the planet's biggest producer of over 22 different cash crops, making its agricultural economy the second largest in the world. Why then does most of its rural population live below subsistence level, relying on foreign NGOs for aid? This program looks at reasons why working villagers remain in poverty, including government policies that direct funding away from development and towards the urban business boom. Viewers meet several struggling families and learn how microcredit programs are helping them boost their household income.
Online
2009
11.

Challenges of Urbanization [electronic resource]: Inequalities in Bangalore

Bangalore's booming IT business lures so many new professionals every year that a separate industry has sprung up to help them settle in. But Bangalore also has more than 1,000 slum areas, and that is where most newcomers, arriving from poverty-stricken rural villages, will end up. This program explains why so many of India's poor continue to migrate to cities like Bangalore, the challenges they face when they arrive, and what the slum-residents themselves are doing to improve their quality of life. Illiteracy, caste discrimination, and the role of grass-roots community groups are all examined.
Online
2009
12.

Colombia [electronic resource]: Flowers for the Gringo

As in the case of coffee, sugar, and other cultivated products, the floral industry would collapse without a steady supply of cheap labor. This program goes inside the world of Colombia's flower growers, in particular those who work the hardest for the lowest pay. Profiling two women with varying experiences, the film reveals both the tenuous nature of life on the industry's bottom rung - Hilda was fired after injuring her shoulder in the workplace - and the occasional ray of hope, as evidenced by Gloria's employer, who pays above the minimum wage. The program also features a union activist fighting an uphill battle to improve worker conditions, reminding viewers that human and corporate interests can rarely be tied into a pretty bouquet.
Online
2009
13.

Mali [electronic resource]: Message From the River

As climate change lays waste to the Niger River, the great Malian city of Timbuktu increasingly resembles a desert landscape. The same is true for much of land-locked Mali, which could, in a worst-case scenario, find itself without water altogether. Incorporating discussions of poverty, population growth, and other issues, this film examines the impact of desertification on two of the nation's indigenous peoples - the fishing-dependent Bozo, who have plied their trade along the Niger for centuries, and the Tuareg, an equally nomadic, pastoral culture threatened by the depletion of desert wells. A Malian environmentalist and a Timbuktu historian both share their expertise.
Online
2009
14.

The Global Marketplace [electronic resource]: Benefits of Globalization

In an age of globalization, companies are scrambling to blend the ideals of social justice with the concept of a free-market economy. Drawing on case studies from around the world, this program focuses on progressive efforts being made by businesses to unite profits and principles. Issues under consideration include the practice of social responsibility through ethical investment policies and codes of conduct, the human and environmental costs of unscrupulous manufacturing, and a renewed emphasis on good employee/employer and supplier/retailer relations.
Online
2006; 2000
15.

United Arab Emirates [electronic resource]: Oil and Water Resources

The UAE's oil is plentiful and readily consumed by an energy-thirsty world; meanwhile, the nation struggles with its own thirst for water. This program documents the history of the wealthy Arab nation and how it deals with water scarcity and an abundance of petroleum. Detailed discussions of the oil drilling and seawater desalinization processes, conversations with young UAE citizens, and a stroll through a souk, or public market, vividly illustrate cultural and economic aspects of this Persian Gulf country.
Online
2005; 2002
16.

India [electronic resource]: Population and Resources

Dramatic changes over the past 20 years have created a tech-savvy Indian middle class. This program details the economic strength of the "new" India, its ongoing problems of unemployment and poverty, and how these issues are linked to overpopulation. Outlining the country's 5,000-year history, the video focuses on the southern city of Bangalore, also known as the Silicon Valley of India, and the daily influx of rural job-seekers it faces. Conversations with women in prominent high-tech positions emphasize changing attitudes toward gender roles.
Online
2005; 2002
17.

Singapore [electronic resource]: Industrialization and Migration

A hub of trade for centuries, Singapore is now an economic powerhouse. This program explores factors that have enabled Singapore to thrive, including its location, its high-tech labor force, and its wide variety of cultural groups and nationalities. Interviews with the deputy manager of the nation's port, conversations with citizens from a spectrum of ethnic backgrounds, and colorful displays of traditional Malay dance and dress reflect Singapore's balance of indigenous and immigrant influences.
Online
2005; 2002
18.

Crime in the Cities [electronic resource]: Public Safety at Risk

Why do urban crime rates soar in some wealthy countries while dropping in others? This program analyzes that question using data-mapping to find telltale patterns in Japan and the United States. With the Japanese crime rate increasing in 90 percent of the nation, a data map based on locations and peak times of criminal activity sheds light on deteriorating conditions in city outskirts. Opposite patterns are observed in New York and Los Angeles, where crime rates have fallen dramatically over five years-partly as a result of improvements in municipal services and environments. Use this program to demonstrate links between crime rates and civic responsibility.
Online
2006; 2004
19.

Extinct Species [electronic resource]: Red Alert to Humanity

Use this program to correlate the precarious existence of endangered species and the forces of global trade. Visiting Indonesia, Japan, and the Florida Everglades, the video studies the difficulty of balancing economic and ecological well-being. The plight of animal populations-Sumatran elephants losing their habitat to palm oil plantations, Oriental white storks feeding in pesticide-ridden waters, and Florida panthers struggling in developed areas-is reinforced by a comprehensive "extinction data map" showing the biosphere's most threatened areas. This program is an effective supplement for environmental studies courses focusing on worldwide economic factors.
Online
2006; 2004
20.

Through a Child's Eyes [electronic resource]: Views of Global Poverty

Most elementary-age children exude innocence and optimism. What about kids who face extreme poverty? This documentary focuses on the plight of underprivileged nine-year-olds across the world-revealing their hardships and challenges as well as the light-hearted spirit they often exhibit in spite of their surroundings. Traveling to Egypt, Rwanda, India, Cambodia, Romania, Brazil, and New York City, the film presents a case study of a child in each location through compelling interviews, tours of struggling schools, and visits to barely livable homes. In every segment, the most illuminating moment follows the question, "What would you do if you had a lot of money?
Online
2007; 2006