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1.

Plankton Planet [electronic resource]: Harmed by Humans

Plankton fills an essential niche in Earth's food chain and a vital role in the health of the planetary ecosystem. For several decades, however, a growing level of human impact on the biosphere has been increasingly modifying the age-old equilibrium of marine plankton. This program examines the broad implications of three major concerns: how the inadvertent transfer of invasive plankton species via ship ballast is negatively altering the biodiversity of plankton; how agricultural runoff and other pollutants are affecting plankton populations; and how rising sea temperatures due to global warming are facilitating the proliferation of toxic plankton species.
Online
2010
2.

Vanishing of the Bees [electronic resource]

Honeybees are essential for the production of more than one-third of the food we eat. But in 2006, beekeepers began reporting that astounding numbers of their honeybees had gone missing, literally disappearing, with no dead bees to be found in or around the hives. A task force was formed to study the international phenomenon; scientists were able to identify its distinct symptoms, and named it "colony collapse disorder." This program investigates colony collapse disorder, looking into its possible causes, exploring its potential consequences, and offering some solutions. Journalist Michael Pollan, apiarists, and others discuss the search for CCD's origin, focusing on evidence that points to monoculture farming and a relatively new class of chemicals called systemic pesticides as the [...]
Online
2009
3.

Where Have All the Elephants Gone? [electronic resource]: Poaching in Tanzania and Kenya

In Tanzania it's estimated that more than 60 elephants are killed by poachers every day, the ivory from the tusks smuggled out of Dar es Salaam and sent off to markets in places like China, where a demand for ivory trinkets has exploded among the new middle class. Both Tanzania and Kenya vow to stamp out poaching, but enormous profits from the slaughter have corrupted politicians and law enforcement officials alike. This program charts the rapid decline of the African elephant as it investigates the illegal ivory trade that's doing them in. Viewers trek from Tanzania's sanctioned wildlife hunts to the seedy underworld of the poachers' black market, then go to an elephant sanctuary, where wildlife advocate Daphne Sheldrick sadly predicts the imminent extinction of these animals in the wild.
Online
2013
4.

The Cost of Sushi [electronic resource]: Emptying the Seas

The bluefin tuna, called by BBC News "one of the most highly-prized-and fought over-species and foodstuffs in the world," is known to fishermen as a "floating goldmine." But the world's taste for sushi has pushed this species to the brink of extinction, and now it is the Mediterranean spawning grounds that are coming under attack. Should bluefin tuna fishing be banned? From Croatia to Greece, from Japan to the coast of Spain, this program investigates the global impact of tuna fishing and asks if there is such a thing as sustainable sushi. The efforts of independent fisheries consultant Roberto Mielgo, who is trying to protect bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean, are spotlighted.
Online
2012
5.

The Battle for the Amazon [electronic resource]: The Xingu vs. The Belo Monte Dam

What will potentially become the world's third-largest hydroelectric dam-and a symbol of the destruction of the last remaining significant rainforest on Earth-is currently under construction in the heart of the Amazon Basin. The Belo Monte Dam complex is expected to devastate an area of more than 370,000 acres of Brazilian rainforest while resulting in the forced displacement of approximately 20,000 people and the expected migration of 100,000 more. In the face of this danger, the Xingu, the indigenous people of the region and hereditary guardians of the forest, have decided to stand their ground and fight. The Battle for the Amazon follows their struggle.
Online
2013
6.

The Poet of Trauma Farm [electronic resource]: Brian Brett

This episode of The Green Interview features Brian Brett, a passionate and diverse award-winning Canadian novelist, critic, and poet. His latest book, Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life, is a lyrical, honest, and often amusing portrayal of rural life interspersed with thought-provoking reflections about the modern world, and rooted throughout by a profound knowledge of biology and botany. It is his memoir based on the last 18 years spent tending a small mixed farm-affectionately named Trauma Farm-on Salt Spring Island in the Gulf Islands of British Columbia. In his book-and in this Green Interview-Brett explores the social realities of rural community life and the consequences of our estrangement from the interconnectedness of all things.
Online
2012
7.

Realm of the Ancient Redwoods [electronic resource]

They are perhaps the oldest lifeform known to us-and, as nature's skyscrapers, they are among the most majestic. From Giant Sequoia trees, those massive denizens of Northern Californian forests...to the Coast Redwood, the world's tallest tree species...to the Dawn Redwood, a living fossil that once flourished in China but now faces extinction... this program examines life on the grand scale of the redwood. Viewers learn about the natural history of these woodland behemoths as the film follows researchers looking for, and finding, the loftiest tree on Earth. The redwood forest's capacity as a natural habitat for myriad animal and plant species is also discussed.
Online
2010
8.

A Fall From Freedom [electronic resource]: Sea Mammals in Captivity

Possessing what amounts to an alien form of intelligence, whales and dolphines also impart a sense of freedom and fellowship when observed in their natural environment. But when captured and penned in, they tell a different story-and often a tragic one. This film exposes the sordid history of the captive whale and dolphin business, which continues to this day. Viewers learn about the illegal trapping and transport of orcas, the thousands of dolphins that are killed in order to provide marine parks and aquariums with replacement animals, and the tendency of these facilities to miseducate the public about ocean life. Includes interviews with scientists, activists, marine biologists, former trainers, and current and past marine park officials.
Online
2011
9.

Keepers of the Koalas [electronic resource]

They may be the cutest animals on the planet, but koalas are also endangered, with populations declining due to habitat destruction, disease, predators, and hazardous encounters with humans. This video puts a spotlight on the Australian Koala Foundation, which is working to redirect koalas away from the path to extinction. Viewers learn about the foundation's goal of protecting the vulnerable marsupials with designated land preserves and with an intensive public education campaign - which shows clear signs of success.
Online
2008
10.

The Great Seal of Hawaii [electronic resource]: Endangered Monk Seals

Far to the northwest of Hawaii's main islands are a series of islets, reefs, and atolls known as the Leeward or Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Here, in an area once terribly abused by humans but now protected under U.S. law, one of the most endangered of all marine mammal species-the Hawaiian monk seal-struggles to survive. This video provides a concise view of the monk seal's fragile surroundings and depicts conservation efforts designed to protect females-a focus made necessary when low population numbers led to increased violence in males.
Online
2008
11.

MAR [electronic resource]: Marine Animal Rescue

Whales, dolphins, seal lions, and other creatures can become beached or entangled in numerous places along the California coast. And while a great many of those cases end sadly, the Los Angeles-based group known as Marine Animal Rescue has also saved thousands of marine animals from death. This video profiles MAR and its participation in the national whale disentanglement network as well as its educational presentations and community outreach programs. MAR's opposition to the capture and confinement of healthy marine mammals is also discussed.
Online
2008
12.

Earthshaker [electronic resource]: The Sam LaBudde Story

There's no shortage of passionately committed environmentalists, but how many of them are accustomed to putting their personal safety, not to mention their lives, on the line? In the eyes of many eco-observers, Sam LaBudde is just such an individual. He has gone undercover to expose the killing of dolphins during tuna fishing operations, the illegal hunting of walruses by native Alaskans who trade tusks for drugs, and the scourge of open-ocean driftnets that have resulted in massive marine mammal deaths. This video documents LaBudde's activities, which tend to provoke the ire of corporate interests and entrenched societal forces.
Online
2008
13.

Ulithi Marine Turtle Project [electronic resource]

Governed by the Federated States of Micronesia in the western Pacific, the Ulithi Atoll features dozens of small islands and one of the world's largest lagoons. It is also a prime nesting area for sea turtles. This program follows a joint effort between Oceanic Society researchers and local islanders to protect the turtles-a program that has met with success in the midst of an active fishing industry and local customs that involve turtle egg harvesting. Viewers learn how the Oceanic Society endeavors to foster conservation while helping to strengthen cultural traditions and promote alternative sustainable livelihoods.
Online
2012
14.

The Farallon Islands [electronic resource]: Past, Present, and Future

Twenty-seven miles west of San Francisco lies a group of islands that many residents of the city are scarcely aware of. Despite their obscurity, the Farallons make up a hauntingly beautiful wilderness area with an astonishing variety of life on and around the islands. With human habitation dating back only about four hundred years, the rocky islands and sea stacks have a rich natural history-and a vulnerable ecosystem. This program offers a unique look at the Farallon Wilderness, including its geography, geology, marine environment, and wildlife, as well as the potential for human impact and damage to it and the research, legislation, and public involvement that have gone into protecting it.
Online
2010
15.

Pity the Pilot Whale [electronic resource]

In Faroese it's called a grindadrap-a "drive hunt" in which dozens of long-finned pilot whales are surrounded, forced into shallow water, hooked through their blow holes, and partially beheaded. While usually non-commercial, the grindadrap does provide food for local communities, but many if not most outsiders see it as cruel, unnecessary, and ecologically unsound. This program contrasts the traditional whaling practices of Faroese islanders with the rescue work of New Zealand activists who try to guide pods of stranded cetaceans back to the open sea. Both behaviors are examined, but the story's real heroes are the whales themselves. Viewers learn how the animals communicate, cooperate, display intelligence, and establish communities and social structures-facts that tend to support r [...]
Online
1994
16.

Last Journey for the Leatherback? [electronic resource]

Only a few hatchlings in a leatherback turtle brood are destined to make it to adulthood-and although a mature specimen's large size and oily flesh tend to ward off most predators, the majestic marine reptile still faces a wide range of human dangers. Chemical and solid waste pollutants create serious hazards, but the greatest harm comes when leatherbacks are snared as bycatch-a frequent occurrence due to the ineffectiveness of many excluder devices. This program provides an introduction to the world of the leatherback turtle and outlines the threat that industrial fishing poses to the species' survival.
Online
2004
17.

The Eagle Has Landed [electronic resource]: Saving America's National Bird

Founded by biologist Al Cicere and supported by entertainer Dolly Parton, the American Eagle Foundation, located in Dollywood, Tennessee, works to breed and reintroduce into its natural habitat the magnificent bald eagle. The foundation also rescues injured eagles and, if possible, returns them back to nature or gives those that cannot be returned a permanent home at the facility. This film visits the group's headquarters and shows biologists raising eagle hatchlings and releasing juveniles into the wild.
Online
2008