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1.

The Sixth Extinction [electronic resource]: Human Role

The five extinctions that have impacted the Earth over the past 400 million years-the Ordovician-Silurian, Late Devonian, Permian-Triassic, End Triassic, and Cretaceous-Tertiary-may be set to include another one on a massive scale. This alarming program assesses the extent to which Homo sapiens is provoking the planet's sixth extinction. According to scientists, wholesale destruction of habitats by humans contributes to the disappearance of 27,000 species each year. With decimation proceeding at such a rate, how long can life on Earth survive? Interviews with Oxford University zoologist Richard Dawkins, Harvard biologist Andrew Knoll, and Sussex University paleontologist Richard Fortney are featured.
Online
2006; 2002
2.

Ghosts of Madagascar [electronic resource]: Shane Untamed

So much about Madagascar seems otherworldly-from the haunting landscapes to the peculiar animals that you can find only here. Even though the razor-sharp Tsingy stone spires and the bat caves beneath them are enough to scare most, Shane O goes deeper into western Madagascar to become one of few Westerners to set foot in a sacred forest. He may even encounter the elusive fossa along the way. Travel with this episode of Shane Untamed to find out if there really is anything about Madagascar to fear at all.
Online
2011
3.

A Fall From Freedom [electronic resource]: Sea Mammals in Captivity

Possessing what amounts to an alien form of intelligence, whales and dolphines also impart a sense of freedom and fellowship when observed in their natural environment. But when captured and penned in, they tell a different story-and often a tragic one. This film exposes the sordid history of the captive whale and dolphin business, which continues to this day. Viewers learn about the illegal trapping and transport of orcas, the thousands of dolphins that are killed in order to provide marine parks and aquariums with replacement animals, and the tendency of these facilities to miseducate the public about ocean life. Includes interviews with scientists, activists, marine biologists, former trainers, and current and past marine park officials.
Online
2011
4.

Keepers of the Koalas [electronic resource]

They may be the cutest animals on the planet, but koalas are also endangered, with populations declining due to habitat destruction, disease, predators, and hazardous encounters with humans. This video puts a spotlight on the Australian Koala Foundation, which is working to redirect koalas away from the path to extinction. Viewers learn about the foundation's goal of protecting the vulnerable marsupials with designated land preserves and with an intensive public education campaign - which shows clear signs of success.
Online
2008
5.

The Great Seal of Hawaii [electronic resource]: Endangered Monk Seals

Far to the northwest of Hawaii's main islands are a series of islets, reefs, and atolls known as the Leeward or Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Here, in an area once terribly abused by humans but now protected under U.S. law, one of the most endangered of all marine mammal species-the Hawaiian monk seal-struggles to survive. This video provides a concise view of the monk seal's fragile surroundings and depicts conservation efforts designed to protect females-a focus made necessary when low population numbers led to increased violence in males.
Online
2008
6.

MAR [electronic resource]: Marine Animal Rescue

Whales, dolphins, seal lions, and other creatures can become beached or entangled in numerous places along the California coast. And while a great many of those cases end sadly, the Los Angeles-based group known as Marine Animal Rescue has also saved thousands of marine animals from death. This video profiles MAR and its participation in the national whale disentanglement network as well as its educational presentations and community outreach programs. MAR's opposition to the capture and confinement of healthy marine mammals is also discussed.
Online
2008
7.

Earthshaker [electronic resource]: The Sam LaBudde Story

There's no shortage of passionately committed environmentalists, but how many of them are accustomed to putting their personal safety, not to mention their lives, on the line? In the eyes of many eco-observers, Sam LaBudde is just such an individual. He has gone undercover to expose the killing of dolphins during tuna fishing operations, the illegal hunting of walruses by native Alaskans who trade tusks for drugs, and the scourge of open-ocean driftnets that have resulted in massive marine mammal deaths. This video documents LaBudde's activities, which tend to provoke the ire of corporate interests and entrenched societal forces.
Online
2008
8.

Ulithi Marine Turtle Project [electronic resource]

Governed by the Federated States of Micronesia in the western Pacific, the Ulithi Atoll features dozens of small islands and one of the world's largest lagoons. It is also a prime nesting area for sea turtles. This program follows a joint effort between Oceanic Society researchers and local islanders to protect the turtles-a program that has met with success in the midst of an active fishing industry and local customs that involve turtle egg harvesting. Viewers learn how the Oceanic Society endeavors to foster conservation while helping to strengthen cultural traditions and promote alternative sustainable livelihoods.
Online
2012
9.

The Farallon Islands [electronic resource]: Past, Present, and Future

Twenty-seven miles west of San Francisco lies a group of islands that many residents of the city are scarcely aware of. Despite their obscurity, the Farallons make up a hauntingly beautiful wilderness area with an astonishing variety of life on and around the islands. With human habitation dating back only about four hundred years, the rocky islands and sea stacks have a rich natural history-and a vulnerable ecosystem. This program offers a unique look at the Farallon Wilderness, including its geography, geology, marine environment, and wildlife, as well as the potential for human impact and damage to it and the research, legislation, and public involvement that have gone into protecting it.
Online
2010
10.

Pity the Pilot Whale [electronic resource]

In Faroese it's called a grindadrap-a "drive hunt" in which dozens of long-finned pilot whales are surrounded, forced into shallow water, hooked through their blow holes, and partially beheaded. While usually non-commercial, the grindadrap does provide food for local communities, but many if not most outsiders see it as cruel, unnecessary, and ecologically unsound. This program contrasts the traditional whaling practices of Faroese islanders with the rescue work of New Zealand activists who try to guide pods of stranded cetaceans back to the open sea. Both behaviors are examined, but the story's real heroes are the whales themselves. Viewers learn how the animals communicate, cooperate, display intelligence, and establish communities and social structures-facts that tend to support r [...]
Online
1994
11.

Last Journey for the Leatherback? [electronic resource]

Only a few hatchlings in a leatherback turtle brood are destined to make it to adulthood-and although a mature specimen's large size and oily flesh tend to ward off most predators, the majestic marine reptile still faces a wide range of human dangers. Chemical and solid waste pollutants create serious hazards, but the greatest harm comes when leatherbacks are snared as bycatch-a frequent occurrence due to the ineffectiveness of many excluder devices. This program provides an introduction to the world of the leatherback turtle and outlines the threat that industrial fishing poses to the species' survival.
Online
2004
12.

The Eagle Has Landed [electronic resource]: Saving America's National Bird

Founded by biologist Al Cicere and supported by entertainer Dolly Parton, the American Eagle Foundation, located in Dollywood, Tennessee, works to breed and reintroduce into its natural habitat the magnificent bald eagle. The foundation also rescues injured eagles and, if possible, returns them back to nature or gives those that cannot be returned a permanent home at the facility. This film visits the group's headquarters and shows biologists raising eagle hatchlings and releasing juveniles into the wild.
Online
2008