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1.

Malawi [electronic resource]: Nation Going Hungry

Poverty, unstable government, and disadvantages in trade have virtually eliminated food security in Malawi. This program explores the African country's struggles on both a personal and national level, interviewing frustrated civil servants and impoverished citizens, and reflecting widespread despair over WTO policies and the government's inability to subsidize the agriculture of its own people. Highlighting the additional problems of environmental degradation and AIDS, the program offers a moving glimpse into human lives that revolve around one constant challenge: getting something to eat.
Online
2006; 2004
2.

Modern Slavery [electronic resource]: Debt Bondage and Child Soldiers

Indentured servitude, however dehumanizing, played a role in the colonization and development of early America. But its 21st-century incarnation, the practice of debt bondage, contributes virtually nothing to the common good of southern Asia. This program examines the plight of workers in India's rural areas, exposing the conditions in which they toil to pay off staggering personal debts. More tragic still are the ranks of child soldiers forced to fight in African militias and armies. Viewers meet Moses, who was kidnapped as a boy and absorbed into Uganda's LRA insurgency. The film shows him going through the process of shedding his soldier's ways, rejoining his family, and trying to reclaim his life.
Online
2010; 2008
3.

Time for School Part 3 [electronic resource]: Hope and Despair in the Fight for an Education

The 2009 installment in Wide Angle's Time for School series reenters the lives of seven students in seven different countries, offering a glimpse of the worldwide battle to get what most American children take for granted: a basic education. These riveting case studies in India, Afghanistan, Kenya, Benin, Brazil, Japan, and Romania feature young teenagers embracing academic challenges that will, with luck and hard work, prepare them for high school. Other hurdles, from school closings to slum crackdowns to violent fundamentalism, continue to disrupt hopes and dreams-forcing one child to repeat a grade, another to study on an empty stomach, and another to quit her education altogether. But a conversation with Benin-born musician and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Angelique Kidjo provides [...]
Online
2010; 2009
4.

Niger [electronic resource]: In the Shadow of Noma

Noma is an acute oral infection that attacks young, malnourished children. If left untreated-which, tragically, is often the case in Africa-it devours bone tissue and permanently disfigures its victims. This unflinching program studies the impact of the pitiless disease and will help viewers assess the ability and readiness of the international community to combat the suffering. Graphic scenes of school-age noma patients are interwoven with commentary from medical experts and heartbreaking accounts from family members who have watched as sons, daughters, and grandchildren succumb to the sickness. The film also describes low-cost interventions that could keep noma from spreading, if resources are made available.
Online
2010; 2009
5.

Chad [electronic resource]: Hydraulic Projects and Peace

Characterized as an LDC or Least Developed Country, the nation of Chad wrestles with drought, population growth, and resulting tensions between farmers and herders. This program investigates hydraulic projects and mediation initiatives that are fostering relationships between Chad's food growers and its nomadic, livestock-centered cultures. Overviewing the basic causes of Chadian land disputes and competition for water sources as well as failed modernization schemes proposed during the 1960s, the film explores new solutions based on recognizing traditional agriculture and natural migration routes. Viewers witness "sit-down" talks between farmers and herders that could help prevent regional conflicts from flaring up.
Online
2010; 2009
6.

Senegal [electronic resource]: Water Treatment and Distribution

Our most valuable treasure, is how residents of Dakar describe the Bay of Han. But pollution from both residential and industrial sources is destroying the body of water that has long supported fishing families in the Senegalese capital. This program reports on Western-aided efforts to restore the bay's ecological health and its viability as an economic resource. Specific challenges include the lack of plumbing services in many Dakar homes and harmful by-products from businesses-exemplified by waste from a local slaughterhouse. Solutions focus on improved piping and drainage, better sewage collection and infrastructure, and the construction of a new water treatment plant and waste discharge system.
Online
2010; 2009
7.

Madagascar [electronic resource]: Agro-Ecology

Illegal deforestation, slash-and-burn practices, poverty, land disputes-these are among the many problems associated with farming in Madagascar. This program guides viewers through the real-world challenges of building sustainable agriculture in the country. Outlining reasons why many growers are unable or unwilling to leave outmoded techniques behind, the film visits community offices that support local farmers in organizing, obtaining microfinancing, and increasing efficiency. Erosion, soil management, irrigation and drainage, and the development of mixed farming-or combining crop cultivation and animal herding-are examined. Ecologists, agriculture experts, and a traveling veterinarian add commentary.
Online
2010; 2009
8.

Congo Basin [electronic resource]: Sustainable Forestry

Among the largest, most pristine areas of tropical woodland on the planet, the Congo Basin forests could easily fall prey to shortsighted and exploitative commercial interests. This program looks at sustainable lumber production initiatives taking root in the region, with a focus on cutting-edge forestry management as well as economic growth through increased cooperation between local concession-holders. Viewers join a planning team and a chain-saw crew in the remote woodlands of Gabon as they take great care to preserve the fragile ecosystem, and another team of advisors as they set up meetings between small African foresters-who, despite initial skepticism, see a need for collective economic leverage.
Online
2010; 2009
9.

Consequences of Conflict [electronic resource]

The consequences of armed conflict are complex and long-lasting. Using Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan as points of departure, this program examines some of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of conflicts at the national and international levels. Topics include the pernicious phenomenon of child soldiers; the plight of refugees and internally displaced persons; thorny issues related to aid money and international assistance; the enduring scars of war on the landscape; the repercussions of ruined infrastructural elements such as power grids; and the unquantifiable losses-the what-could-have-beens-that inevitably occur when a nation's money is diverted from education and health care.
Online
2010; 2009
10.

Mali [electronic resource]: Message From the River

As climate change lays waste to the Niger River, the great Malian city of Timbuktu increasingly resembles a desert landscape. The same is true for much of land-locked Mali, which could, in a worst-case scenario, find itself without water altogether. Incorporating discussions of poverty, population growth, and other issues, this film examines the impact of desertification on two of the nation's indigenous peoples - the fishing-dependent Bozo, who have plied their trade along the Niger for centuries, and the Tuareg, an equally nomadic, pastoral culture threatened by the depletion of desert wells. A Malian environmentalist and a Timbuktu historian both share their expertise.
Online
2009
11.

Kenya [electronic resource]: National Identity and Unity

From the Great Rift Valley to the shores of the Indian Ocean, Kenya contains extraordinary diversity in culture, landscape, and wildlife. This program surveys the history of the country, its difficult transition out of colonial rule, and its wide variety of ethnic groups and languages. Visits to a Nairobi high school, a Masai village, and two wildlife conservation areas underscore the challenges modern Kenya faces in economic progress and environmental protection.
Online
2005; 2002
12.

Ecological Issues in Kenya [electronic resource]

East Africa's wild beauty may also be its greatest challenge. This program describes the ecological issues arising when a finite amount of land is needed for ever-growing human and animal populations. Where will Kenya's varied wildlife go when cities expand into age-old migration paths? How will farmers and cattle ranchers protect their land from invading animals? And how can a developing nation boost its much-needed tourist industry without harming its equally valuable natural resources? The program features eye-opening commentary from Professor Wangari Muta Maathai-winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize and founder of Kenya's Green Belt Movement.
Online
2006; 2003
13.

Time for School Part 1 [electronic resource]: Global Education Crisis

Over 100 million children worldwide have never spent a day in school. One in four does not complete even five years of basic education. Now, 182 nations have promised to provide access to free and compulsory education for every child in the world-by 2015. To test the reality of that sweeping commitment, this Wide Angle installment profiles children in Japan, Kenya, Benin, Brazil, Romania, Afghanistan, and India who have managed to enroll in the first year of primary school-in most cases despite great odds. Exploring cultural comparisons from viewpoints that are too often overlooked, this program offers an in-depth study of the lives of young people in widely differing circumstances, as each one takes a hopeful first step into an uncertain future. Original WNET broadcast title: Time f [...]
Online
2006; 2003
14.

Back to School Part 2 [electronic resource]: Ongoing Struggle to Educate the World's Children

In 2003, the Wide Angle program Time for School profiled children in seven countries-Afghanistan, Benin, Brazil, India, Japan, Kenya, and Romania-as they started their first year of school, often in the face of great adversity. Three years later this Wide Angle episode returns to visit each child, updating the progress of their educational and personal development. The similarities and contrasts that emerge among the lives of these young people provide rich insight into the disparities of opportunity around the globe-underscoring the hard fact that more than 100 million children worldwide are growing up without schooling. This richly detailed documentary puts a human face on the global crisis in access to education. Additionally, anchor Daljit Dhaliwal discusses the state of global e [...]
Online
2006
15.

Growing Up in Africa [electronic resource]: Helping Children in Benin, Kenya, South Africa, and Uganda

Based on recent statistics, 90 percent of the world's orphans live in sub-Saharan Africa; 40 percent of African children work seven days a week; and many support themselves by prostitution or are subjected to enslavement. This program highlights the work of the Terre des Hommes Oasis Center, in Benin, which rescues, rehabilitates, and returns exploited children to their families; the Jinja School for Orphans, in Uganda; extended families on Kenya's Lamu Island, who educate and support the locale's many orphans; Barbara Petersen, who feeds and counsels street children in South Africa; and, also in South Africa, the Dance for All project, an initiative that brings dance to the poor areas of Cape Town.
Online
2008; 2004
16.

Africa Calling [electronic resource]: Appeal for Understanding

Mental images of storybook adventures and stereotyped people, on the one hand, and genocides and pandemics, on the other, make it practically impossible for Westerners to see Africa as it really is: a place with generational conflicts, cultural misunderstandings, and power struggles-just like anywhere else-plus the added dilemma of how to deal with the tension between tradition and modernity as the already rapid pace of progress continues to accelerate. Bringing together segments from other episodes in The Call of Africa series, this program strives to build bridges of genuine understanding about human rights, political power structures, the environment, public health, marriage customs, emigration, and many other vital topics through the views of real people living in the real Africa.
Online
2008; 2004