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Human Anatomy
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1.

Experiential Anatomy in Dance Technique: Eight Skeletal Explorations

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"Experiential anatomy in dance technique will help instructors develop class material that allows their students to improve their understanding of their bodies -- and their ability to make educated choices about their movements while becoming more dynamic and versatile dancers. This DVD explores eight body areas: shoulder joint; scapula; hip joint; knee joint; spine; rib cage; tibia and fibula; and ankle, tarsus, and toes. For each area, the DVD features an instructor who identifies skeletal and anatomical features using a model skeleton, leads students in locating the anatomical features on themselves or on a partner, demonstrates movement explorations focusing on that body area, and choreographs phrases that explore that particular body area."--Container.
DVD
2011
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Understanding the Human Body: An Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

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In this 32-lecture video course, Dr. Anthony Goodman puts a solid understanding of human anatomy and physiology easily. You'll learn to see the structure and functioning of our bodies as an awesome, integrated unity, a perspective that reveals the logic and symmetry of the human organism with compelling clarity.
DVD
2003
3.

Blue End

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Joseph Paul Jernigan was 39 years old when he was executed in Hunstville, Texas, in 1993. Ten minutes after the lethal injection, he was handed over to scientists, transported to Denver, frozen in blue gelatin and, over a period of four months, photographed as he was planned off, millimeter-by-millimeter. He would be reborn on the Internet as the "visible man" -- the first completely digitized human being. This worldwide, digitally distributed Visible Human Project is the result of a unique interaction between science and justice.
VHS
2000
Ivy (By Request)
4.

The Incredible Human Machine

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Using a variety of different photographic techniques, the program takes the viewer on a tour of the human body.
VHS
1993; 1975
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Body Building [electronic resource]

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This episode is about the remarkable advances being made to repair and replace damaged human body parts. You'll learn about a self-contained artificial heart, a lab where tissue is grown for body parts like livers and eye retina, look at the innovative "liver chip," and learn about efforts to grow new nerve cells that might help injured spinal cords heal themselves. Finally see courageous paralyzed volunteers test the Functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems.
Online
2005; 2000
6.

First to Last [electronic resource]

Starting with a water birth shot in slow motion and featuring a stunning graphics sequence that goes inside the chambers of the heart, this program focuses on the countless small miracles the human body performs minute by minute in order to stay alive. Viewers learn how an infant's first breath leads to a rewiring of its entire circulatory system - and meet a diver who can hold his breath for up to nine minutes, a man who can swim in glacial lakes so cold they would kill a normal person, and a woman who has lived on a diet of crackers for ten years. The video also demonstrates what happens when the body finally fails.
Online
2011
7.

Up [electronic resource]: To Boldly Go

The natural home of our species is at sea level. The higher we go, the less oxygen there is in the air and the harder we find it to survive. In this program, doctor of extreme medicine Kevin Fong conducts a series of experiments to determine how the human body responds to altitude. He climbs one of the tallest mountains in the Alps and subjects himself to a sudden depressurization at 25,000 feet.
Online
2012
8.

Bones [electronic resource]

In this program, Dr. Alice Roberts charts the advance from Australopithecus to Homo erectus and beyond to demonstrate what the modern skeleton reveals about human evolution. Examining the traits of chimps and an intriguing Sahelanthropus hominid fossil, she also discusses the role of bipedalism in the emergence of Homo sapiens. Along the way, viewers learn what running shoes to wear, the purpose of armpit hair, and whether back pain is an inevitable consequence of simply standing up.
Online
2011
9.

How Is Science Impacting Our Physical Performance? [electronic resource]

This episode examines how science is changing the way we look at physical endurance and the discoveries that could change the future for the better. Viewers meet a scientist who is pursuing research into the differences that carbohydrate fuel can make to soccer players-in particular the benefits of carbohydrates ingested during a game. The results are intriguing and lead to an exciting discovery regarding how we'd previously viewed the way our bodies work. A part of Ever Wondered? (Series 1).
Online
2011
10.

Brains [electronic resource]

Drawing on research into social politics among chimpanzees, the cognitive development of children, and the ancient tools that have been found littered across the Rift Valley, in this program Dr. Alice Roberts explores how Homo sapiens developed such large brains - and asks why we are the only species of our kind left on the planet today. She also discusses how caring for large-brained offspring has shaped civilization, and the evolutionary adaptation that allows grandmothers to help raise their grandchildren.
Online
2011
11.

Keep Your Cells in Shape [electronic resource]

People who exercise have better health and live longer, but scientists can't fully explain the mechanics of this. This ABC News report looks at a small scientific study that found 50-year-old adults who regularly exercised vigorously - such as marathon runners or endurance athletes - appeared biologically younger than healthy people the same age who were not active.
Online
2008
12.

The Future of Our Body: 1 [electronic resource]

As scientific discoveries continue, will we one day produce a flawless human specimen? We already have breast implants from body tissue and facial surgery using organic materials to make us look younger or correct deficiencies resulting from diseases or accidents. Paraplegic patients learn how to walk assisted by a robot and prosthesis that react like a healthy arm are already available. The dream of human perfection may soon become a reality?
Online
2000
13.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Peter Saul - Let's Talk About Dying

We can't control if we'll die, but we can "occupy death," in the words of Dr. Peter Saul. In this TEDTalk, he calls on us to make clear our preferences for end-of-life care - and suggests two questions for starting the conversation. Over the past 35 years, Saul has been intimately involved in the dying process of more than 4,000 patients and is passionate about improving the ways we die.
Online
2012
14.

The Senses [electronic resource]: A Horizon Guide

Touch, sight, smell, hearing and taste: the five senses help define what it means to be human. In Horizon Guide to Senses we see how our senses gather millions of details about the world around us, sending our brains a constant stream of information. This input is our only link with the outside world and an important part of human survival.
Online
2012
15.

A Gentler Jolt to the Heart [electronic resource]

Cardiologists and electrophysiologists are studying electrical methods to reduce the pain associated with cardiac defibrillator shocks-making the jolts less jarring but maintaining their life-saving effects.
Online
2012
16.

Allergy Drops for Dogs Train Immune System [electronic resource]

Oral medication reduces allergic reactions in man's best friend.
Online
2012
17.

Between Life and Death [electronic resource]

Doctors can interrupt and even reverse the process of death. Filmed over six months in the country's leading brain injury unit at Addenbooke's Hospital, Cambridge, this documentary follows Prof. David Menon and his colleagues as they treat three patients with traumatic brain injuries. One man who, by only moving his eyes, is eventually asked if he wants to live or die. The Seaman and Clark families are also plunged into the most ethically difficult decision in modern medicine.
Online
2012
18.

Cellphones Detecting Asthma [electronic resource]

A simple breath test could sense when an asthma attack may strike.
Online
2013
19.

Electronic Devices That Dissolve in Your Body [electronic resource]

Disappearing technology could improve your health and the environment.
Online
2013
20.

Expanding Universe [electronic resource]

Amidst the rich natural history of the United States, Professor Brian Cox encounters the astonishing creatures that reveal how the senses evolved. Every animal on Earth experiences the world in a different way, using a unique suite of senses to detect its physical environment. Tracing the evolution of these mechanisms is a story that takes us through life's journey-from single-celled organisms to more complex, sentient beings. Brian finds that over the course of 3.8 billion years, the senses have driven life in new directions and may, ultimately, have led to our own curiosity and intelligence.
Online
2013