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1.

Motherland: A Genetic Journey

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Cut off from their ancestry by the three-hundred-year-long slave trade which uprooted 12 million people from Africa, three people are given the opportunity, through DNA searches, to reconnect with their roots. Through advances in DNA research and with the help of laboratories in the UK and America, the possibility arises that with a swab from the inside of a person's cheek they can trace back twelve or thirteen generations to the tribe of their ancestors.
DVD
2003
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

My Genes Speak for Me [electronic resource]: Reconciling Nature and Nurture

Conceived with the help of a Nobel Prize-winning sperm donor, a baby girl blossoms into a gifted, highly intelligent woman. Does her talent come solely from heredity? What about the case of female twins, separated at birth, who exhibit astonishing similarities in habit and behavior when they meet later in life? This film explores the possibility that genetics and environment are not diametrically opposed when it comes to human development - instead, the program asserts, they should be seen as complementary. Other case studies involve fatal nutritional disorders that are passed from one generation to the next, as well as Tay-Sachs disease, the genetic disorder notorious for its impact on one particular ethnic group, the Ashkenazi Jewish community. A timely analysis of lingering, probl [...]
Online
2007
3.

Skin Deep [electronic resource]: Nina Jablonski's Theory of Race

Students of evolution understand that when our ancient African ancestors lost their body hair and ventured out onto the hot savannah, their skin became dark to protect against UV radiation, while subsequent migration away from the equator yielded paler people. But in 2000, Penn State University anthropologist Nina Jablonski proposed a startling new theory as to why human pigmentation is so diverse. In this program, Jablonski suggests that skin color evolved mainly to allow for the production of vitamin D and folic acid, both necessary for reproductive success. Focusing on groundbreaking research and personal accounts of scientists around the world, the film takes a fresh look at the interplay between environmental adaptation and human skin tones.
Online
2012
4.

Neanderthals Still Walk the Earth? [electronic resource]

Neanderthals were thought to be extinct, but this ABC News report looks at how the assumption is actually incorrect. Scientists studying human DNA have found that most of us get up to four percent of our genetic material from Neanderthals. Since humans on the African continent lack the genes, the theory is that humans migrating from Africa mated with Neanderthals somewhere in the Middle East, before they settled in other parts of the world.
Online
2010
5.

Things You Need to Know...About Evolution [electronic resource]

Would you consider cabbage as the leafy long-lost relative? James May does, thanks to the genius of Charles Darwin. But exactly how does Darwin's famous theory of natural selection explain why we are all mutants and what war is actually good for? James treks off into the wilderness with the natural advantage of fantastic motion graphics and vivid animation to show us how.
Online
2012
6.

DNA [electronic resource]: Secret of Photo 51

One of the greatest scientific achievements of the 20th century was the discovery of DNA's double helix structure. James Watson and Francis Crick published their findings on April 25, 1953, but it's been revealed that their crucial breakthrough depended on the work of another biologist, Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray image, 'Photo 51' held the vital clue to decode the double helix. This program from NOVA reveals the shocking truth of this DNA discovery and details how close Franklin came to making the discovery herself.
Online
2003
7.

Genetic Engineering [electronic resource]

It's one of the greatest breakthroughs in scientific history, but genetic engineering has also brought disturbing new questions. Should we push genetic research to its absolute limit, exploiting every discovery? What are the consequences of intervening in nature's processes at their most fundamental level? Outlining the potential benefits of genetic engineering, such as the treatment or cure of hereditary diseases and the creation of better, more efficient crops, this program also explores the moral dilemma over cloning and the controversy that surrounds stem-cell research. Viewers encounter both secular and religious perspectives in those debates-which will only acquire greater urgency as the scientific frontier advances.
Online
2011
8.
IVF

IVF [electronic resource]

Jokes about test-tube babies may have faded into pop-culture history, but today, even though in vitro fertilization has helped millions of people become parents, the technology still leads some cultural observers to question its methods, applications, and moral impact. IVF can be used to weed out hereditary diseases, but this ability to select embryos based on DNA testing also raises fears about choosing gender, hair color, eye color, and other aspects. Furthermore, what are the economic implications? Should IVF be affordable for everyone? This program shows how different countries have dealt with IVF-related controversies and looks at the often opposing stances which various religions take towards the procedure.
Online
2011
9.

The Book of Life [electronic resource]: Genetics and Evolution

Likening the beauty and complexity of DNA to an epic poem, this program revolves around the idea that we all carry the story of life on Earth in our genes, and that the similarities between species may play a more significant role in that story than previously thought. A visit to Iceland's hot springs reveals heat-, acid-, and salt-resistant organisms called Archaea-primordial versions of which may have set the stage for multi-cellular life. Moving to more advanced species, the film looks at bone-development genes in boa constrictors that are comparable to those of humans. Such parallels, the program says, indicate not only shared genetic origins but also the notion that particular clusters of genes are focal points of evolutionary importance.
Online
2011
10.

Unlocking the Code [electronic resource]: Genetics and Medicine

Although the impact of genetic research on human life is an ever-changing and often theoretical prospect, our current knowledge of the human genome already has direct, real-world applications. This program looks at several ways in which genetic breakthroughs have improved health care technology and enriched the study of human physiology. Case studies focus on DNA screening and its benefits-for both parents and children-in identifying hereditary problems, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease, and congenital and developmental abnormalities. The film also explores implications for type-2 diabetes, the complex area of multifactorial genetic disorders, the chain termination method of DNA sequencing, and more.
Online
2011
11.

Cutting and Splicing DNA [electronic resource]

This program presents a brief history of genetic science, from Darwin's theory of evolution through the discovery of DNA and the invention of gene splicing. Darwin hypothesized a theory, but understood nothing of the mechanism of evolution. The program follows the history of scientific understanding of the nucleus, chromosomes, and the location of hereditary information; explains the work of Gregor Mendel and Thomas Hunt Morgan; and features exclusive interviews with James Watson, who unravelled the secret of DNA's structure, and Stanley Cohen, who first spliced the gene and created contemporary cloning techniques. Spectacular computer animation displays the beautiful simplicity of the DNA molecule, and reveals how the gene was spliced.
Online
2007; 1988
12.

Evolution [electronic resource]: Man Takes a Hand

This program provides an explanation of how the twin techniques of gene splicing and cloning are helping to unravel the secrets of variation. Genetic engineering is altering the branching pattern of natural evolution-which proceeds by mutations within a species and sexual recombination within that species-into a network, in which genes are moved within the laboratory from any species to any other species. The program explains the irreversible and unforeseeable results of gene splicing and the scientific and governmental regulations under consideration-realistic scientific and moral questions, uninformed though highly imaginative hysteria. and the actual effects of cloning; it explains the sequences of DNA, how we are learning to read them, the masterminding message in the DNA of many [...]
Online
2007; 1988
13.

The Human Genome [electronic resource]

This program explores the search for the one specific disease-causing gene among a hundred thousand genes clustered on 23 pairs of chromosomes-a maze called the human genome. In the 1950s, we discovered that genes were sections of the long strand of hereditary material, DNA; in the 1970s, we learned how to cut and splice that strand; in the 1990s, we are labeling the individual genes that carry beneficial or unwanted characteristics. The program shows how individual genes are being identified, and the moral and psychological dilemma confronting doctor and patient when a disease like Huntington's chorea can be genetically identified: Is it better to live with fear or risk knowing that a lingering and horrible death awaits?
Online
2005; 1988
14.

DNA Techniques [electronic resource]

This program gives an explanation of the promises and the dangers inherent in deciphering the gene map, and a warning about the dangers of eliminating genetic variation and recessive traits. The program analyzes the potential misuse of genetic information and demonstrates the potential of genetic engineering to provide the first true preventive medicine program in medical history, as well as the possibility of eradicating single-gene defects like thalassemia; it also explains the dangers of narrowing the genetic pool, and-in a segment with extraordinary photography-shows the injection of human genes into mouse ova so that they merge with the mouse DNA. And the program proceeds to ask: Is this the first step to wiping out genetic illness-or to wiping out ourselves?
Online
2008; 1988
15.

Designer Plants [electronic resource]

We may not recognize the plants and animals our children eat. But the real issue is whether the power of the gene will be wisely used, or will it be diverted to the personal ends of those seeking financial profit or political power? Biotechnology is all that stands between a burgeoning world population and starvation. Already, ordinary milking cows are a disappearing species, plants are genetically matched to growing conditions, and plants are being engineered to kill the caterpillars that attack them. This program shows how this is done and explains its benefits, while warning of the dangers inherent in this and other efforts to alter natural evolution.
Online
2007; 1988
16.

Depleting the Gene Bank [electronic resource]

This program discusses the dangers of selecting and breeding better and better and fewer and fewer varieties. It explains the dangers of depleting the gene bank: when new diseases or predators appear, entire species may be wiped out because no naturally-resistant varieties remain; and the smaller number of varieties offered tend to omit the regionally well-adapted ones in favor of more generally adapted plants-another disaster waiting to happen. The hopeful side of agricultural experimentation is plant tissue culture, which is the model for an entirely new way to produce more and better plants, more quickly. The reality is that in agriculture, no fix is permanent-insect genetics are constantly changing, and agricultural geneticists are in a race against world starvation.
Online
2008; 1988
17.

Sowing the Seeds of Disaster [electronic resource]

Technology has poisoned our planet and biotechnology may be the way to save it. This program shows how biotechnology is finding, altering, and growing answers to chemical pollution-how PCB-eating organisms are designed, tested, and produced and how frost-resistant plant strains are produced. It also examines the dangers of introducing nonnatural substances into our ecosystems, when we are unable to forsee their potential side effects. Love Canal serves as an example.
Online
2005; 1988
18.

Growing Synthetics [electronic resource]

Biogeneticists are engineering new yeasts and fungi as well as entirely new growing methods, and in the process are giving a new definition to the word "natural." If yeasts and fungi can turn decaying wood into sugar, why should humans not be able to grow ethanol cheaply and efficiently? This program follows the course of the research into the artificial culture of natural trees, as well as new methods of accelerating plant propagation and growth. The program demonstrates how extraordinarily effective gene-spliced bacteria can be-but how, if a mistake is made somewhere or somehow, we know of no way to undo the combination and bring the menacing new creation back into the test tube.
Online
2008
19.

Cell Wars [electronic resource]

Biotechnology combines man and mouse to track and attack man's most feared diseases, using cells to kill killer cells. Exceptional computer animation demonstrates how the body's immune system works. The program explains the role of antibodies in vaccinations and allergies, and shows the uses of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of different types of tumors, as well as the immune system deficiency syndrome AIDS.
Online
2008
20.

Recombinant Technology [electronic resource]

The search for a magic bullet against cancer and AIDS is leading to recombinant technology-to explain the nature of the disease problem, help the body's immune system destroy the invader, and accelerate recovery from treatment. As more diseases are being nearly wiped out, more disease-resistant bacteria and viruses are turning up. Vaccine developers are using genetically-engineered vaccines to create more effective vaccines that are cheaper to grow and easier to deliver. The diseases for which vaccines are being sought range from AIDS to colon cancer; the longer-range goal is to understand the role of oncogenes in controlling growth, and therefore to solving the underlying problem of cancer itself.
Online
2008