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81.

Bioinformatics, Genomics, and Proteomics [electronic resource]: Getting the Big Picture

If the 20th century was the era of physics and nuclear fission, the 21st belongs to the life sciences. Moving from gene, to genome, to genetically based diseases, this program provides an overview of the interrelated fields of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics, with an emphasis on practical applications of biotechnology to the field of medicine. Are genetically personalized drugs around the next corner? Commentary is provided by Bob Forgey, of ProNAi Therapeutics; Bill Worzel and Jeanne Orhnberger, of Genetics Squared; and Drs. Brian Athey and Elliott Hill, of the University of Michigan.
Online
2009
82.

Biotechnology and Your Health [electronic resource]: Pharmaceutical Applications

Scientists have come a long, long way since Alexander Fleming's discovery of penicillin, the wonder drug of the 20th century. This program explains the function of infection-fighting antibiotics; vaccinations and insulin, crucial to the prevention of diseases such as smallpox and the management of diabetes; recombinant drugs, treatments involving genetically engineered DNA; and stem cells, those chameleon-like building blocks of the body. Commentary is provided by Drs. James Baker, Brian Athey, and Elliott Hill, of the University of Michigan; Susanne Kleff, of MBI International; and Bob Forgey, of ProNAi Therapeutics.
Online
2009
83.

The Ethics of Biotechnology [electronic resource]

The Nuclear Age-sprung upon the world with the atomic bomb-remains a bitter memory. How biotechnology, with its power to change life on Earth at the most fundamental level, will be viewed in the decades to come depends on decisions being made right now. This program confronts viewers with some of the ethical and moral implications of cloning, stem cell research, and animal testing. Commentary is provided by Jeanne Orhnberger, of Genetics Squared; Bob Forgey, of ProNAi Therapeutics; Drs. Elliott Hill, Brian Athey, and James Baker, of the University of Michigan; Len Fleck, of Michigan State University; and Susanne Kleff, of MBI International.
Online
2009
84.

Biotechnology on the Farm and in the Factory [electronic resource]: Agricultural and Industrial Applications

As the world's population and overall standard of living continue to increase, the growing demand for food, fuel, and consumer products has reached unprecedented levels. This program examines how biotechnology is helping to meet those needs through genetic engineering to increase crop yields and improve the nutritional value of key staple foods; animal agriculture, founded on selective breeding and edging toward lab-based genetic engineering; and industrial applications of biotech in the manufacturing of chemicals, textiles, beverages, and fuel. Commentary is provided by Steve Pueppke and Len Fleck, of Michigan State University; Farzaneh Teymouri and Susanne Kleff, of MBI International; Jeanne Orhnberger, of Genetics Squared; and Bob Forgey, of ProNAi Therapeutics.
Online
2009
85.

Homo Futurus [electronic resource]: Challenge to Darwinian Thinking

Recent findings in the fossil record have, in some scientific quarters, led to radical ideas on evolution. This program presents an intriguing and highly controversial theory: that human development has been-and continues to be-guided by genetic forces within us, rather than by the pressures of our environment. Following the work of paleontologist Anne Dambricourt Malasse and orthodontist Marie-Josephe Deshayes, the film illustrates curious discoveries about the sphenoid, a small bone in the human skull, and its possible role as a kind of evolutionary regulator. Viewers will be immersed in anthropological and dental research occurring in South Africa, China, France, and Switzerland.
Online
2009; 2005
86.

Made in Taiwan [electronic resource]: Genes, Culture, and the Peopling of the South Pacific

DNA testing has become a standard tool in genealogical research, but it takes more than saliva swabs and lab reports to truly understand one's ancestry. In this program, two young New Zealanders of Polynesian descent undergo DNA sampling, wrestle with the surprising results, and then embark on a journey of discovery, searching for their roots across the Pacific and into Asia. Their voyage-by land, sea, and air-traces in reverse the steps their ancestors would have taken thousands of years ago, passing through the Cook Islands, Samoa, Vanuatu, and ending eventually in Taiwan. For studying the overlap between genomic research and the cultural aspects of human migration, this is a moving and highly relevant odyssey.
Online
2009; 2006
87.

Developments in the Food Industry [electronic resource]: Science, Technology, and the Environment

Although genetic modification of plants and animals has been going on since the dawn of agriculture, technological changes of unprecedented scope have taken place in the food industry within the past few decades. This program explores the impact of technology on food production and the development of new and emerging foods. Viewers are introduced to recently devised methods of genetic modification and selective breeding which have expanded both crop and livestock yields. Other topics include the growth of the novelty food industry and new approaches to food packaging design, reflecting concern over ecological issues. Prominent academics add commentary.
Online
2009; 2007
88.

Genetics, Stem Cells, and Society [electronic resource]: Interview With AlTrounson

One of Australia's most distinguished scientists, Dr. Alan Trounson administered early IVF fertility treatments and is now an internationally recognized leader in stem cell research. In this extended interview, he reflects on a range of research techniques and genetics issues-including gene expression and epigenetics; real-world applications for genetics and epigenetics; triggering differentiation; the use of adult rather than embryonic stem cells; developmental abnormalities and childhood cancers; genomics and cell biology; and the challenges and opportunities the field of genetics presents for young researchers. Dr. Trounson also describes his Cambridge education and how his career developed.
Online
2009; 2007
89.

Genes and Cloning [electronic resource]: Science of Selective Breeding

Public controversy surrounding cloning and genetic modification increases with each new development in the field. Illustrating concepts at the heart of the debate, this program shows how biotechnology now drives large-scale agriculture through genetic engineering and sophisticated selective breeding. Outlining ways in which humans have indirectly modified plants and animals since the dawn of agriculture, the program details our ability to construct and insert genes for desirable characteristics into plants and increase livestock productivity with beneficial traits-screening out animals with disease or lower food yields. Engaging animation sequences reinforce important biotech concepts.
Online
2009; 2006
90.

Stem Cells [electronic resource]: Ethical Issues

Providing a balanced look at a highly contentious issue, this program takes viewers inside the scientific, religious, and philosophical debate over embryonic stem cell research. Divergent opinions and perspectives are presented by respected researchers, thinkers, and stakeholders-including renowned Australian geneticist Dr. Alan Trounson; Father Norman Ford, a prominent ethics commentator and opponent of embryonic stem cell research; and patients with life-threatening medical conditions that stem cell innovations could potentially treat or cure. Each speaker identifies core principles and calmly articulates the reasons for his or her views.
Online
2009; 2006
91.

Designer Genes [electronic resource]: Science and Ethics of Genetic Engineering

From selective breeding in agriculture to animal cloning and the production of recombinant proteins, science continues to develop ways to modify the genetic code. This program spotlights the basic tools and techniques for manipulating DNA and how these are also used to investigate genetic functions. Viewers will learn about the coding and non-coding sections of DNA; the basics of PCR or the polymerase chain reaction; the use of viral vectors and plasmids in order to transfer DNA; and the various types of cloning, including molecular, cellular, and nuclear. Ethical questions arising from genetic engineering and the manipulation of DNA are also discussed.
Online
2009; 2008
92.

Natural Selection [electronic resource]: Its Place in Today's World

How do humans influence changes in other species? Has Homo sapiens itself stopped evolving? This program explores natural selection as an ongoing phenomenon, showing how evolutionary processes continue to shape the future of all life on Earth. Exploring the competition for resources, territory, and mates that occurs in any ecosystem, the video illustrates how species differentiation takes place-whether the environment is a petri dish, a jungle, or a major city. Also discussed: morphological, physiological, and behavioral variation; the relationship between agriculture, selective breeding, and genetic modification; and the puzzling anthropological discovery known as the Hobbit.
Online
2009; 2008
93.

Charles Darwin and the Tree of Life [electronic resource]

Marking the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, this program shows how Charles Darwin developed his theory of evolution and explores its ramifications in today's scientific community. Renowned natural history interpreter David Attenborough travels the globe, examining fresh evidence for Darwinian thought and illustrating why it is more relevant than ever. Viewers encounter findings from a wide range of disciplines, including paleontology, biogeography, anatomy, and embryology, as well as early controversies surrounding the study of plate tectonics. Spectacular wildlife footage reveals fascinating animal behavior and helps depict the theory that changed the world's thinking.
Online
2009
94.

Epigenetics [electronic resource]: How Food Upsets Our Genes

Why are girls entering puberty at progressively younger ages? Why are the rates of heart attack, cancer, and adult-onset diabetes rising? This program examines growing indications that food affects our genes-a concept vitally important to the science of epigenetics. Viewers encounter a wide range of experiments, case studies, and historical evidence, including Dutch birth records and testimonials from WWII that point to the epigenetic effects of starvation. Findings from animal and human nutritional studies, as well as evidence involving diet habits and environmental threats around the globe, are also presented. DNA methylation, the "on-and-off switch" of the epigenome, and other important concepts are featured.
Online
2009; 2008
95.

Of Apes and Men [electronic resource]: Culmination of Darwin's Research

When On the Origin of Species appeared in 1859, it quickly took hold in the popular imagination-but it also glossed over significant and rather disturbing questions. This program explores Darwin's ideas on human evolution, which he developed and made public toward the end of his life. Science interpreter Jim Doherty reveals how Darwin searched for parallels between humans and animals through a diverse array of experiments. Beginning by testing the intelligence of earthworms using Darwin's paper triangle method, Doherty then focuses on the Victorian biologist's observations of monkeys, apes, and children, as well as his interest in the work of French anatomist Guillaume Duchenne, who studied facial musculature and expressions.
Online
2009; 2008
96.

The Secret of Genes [electronic resource]

Longevity may or may not come from one's family tree-but with the help of science, could it one day be "inserted" into our genes? This program looks at research in genetic modification that might help extend human life spans. Spotlighting recent DNA experiments on the C. elegans worm, the program also describes longevity studies in mice, mollusks, and fungi-all of which shed light on possibilities for genetic alteration in humans. Students will learn about the roles played by mitochondria and free radicals while the genetic implications of diet and metabolism are also explored. Conclusions based on studies of Okinawan populations and the Biosphere 2 venture of the early 1990s are featured.
Online
2009; 2005
97.

Secrets of the Sequence [electronic resource]: Human Health

1.In the Blood: In this report, doctors attempt to use a leukemia patient's own bone marrow as a source of life-saving stem cells. 2.Sickle Cell Anemia: The most common genetic disease in America is also one of the most painful and debilitating. But an experiment on mice has raised hopes with an anti-sickling gene therapy. 3.Using a Killer to Cure: This segment highlights work at MIT and Harvard to combat sickle-cell anemia - with a therapy derived from HIV. Transitioning from mice to human clinical trials is discussed. 4.Decoding Malaria: Increasingly drug-resistant and adaptable, malaria is a formidable foe. This report shows how scientists have cracked malaria's code and can begin to read its battle plans. 5.Tissues with Issues: What if transplant candidates didn't have to wait fo [...]
Online
2008; 2007
98.

Secrets of the Sequence [electronic resource]: Genetics/Heredity

1.Lab of the Future: Sequencing the human genome has transformed biology, turning it into an information science in which computing power is the key tool. This segment shows how the new computer-driven genetics has begun to unlock the secret of life. 2.Array of Life: It took scientists decades to learn how to sequence the human genome. Now it is being done every day in labs across the country - thanks to a groundbreaking research method. This report sheds light on the procedure known as gene microarray analysis. 3.The Code Cracker: In this segment, viewers meet Francis Collins, director of the Human Genome Project at NIH. Unlike many of his colleagues, Collins rejected the promise of earning millions in the private sector and is as concerned with the ethics of genetic research as he [...]
Online
2008; 2007
99.

The Addictive Personality [electronic resource]

Does addiction have a genetic factor? Can any type of addiction be treated medically? What steps can family members take to help a loved one struggling with addiction? This program provides answers to several addiction-related questions, focusing on the complexities of the addictive personality. Viewers will benefit from a case study featuring a patient with a serious gambling addiction, and from a genetics-oriented discussion inspired by two sisters with addictive personalities. Expert commentary comes from Dr. Michael Fingerhood of Johns Hopkins University Hospital, who works with alcohol and drug abusers, and Terrence Shulman, founder of the Shulman Center for Shopping and Shoplifting Addiction Treatment.
Online
2009; 2007
100.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: James Watson, the Double Helix and Today's DNA Mysteries

James Watson and Francis Crick's 1953 discovery of DNA's double-helix structure paved the way for the astounding breakthroughs in genetics and medicine that marked the second half of the 20th century. How did they do it? Watson - a Nobel Laureate and former head of the Human Genome Project - opens TED2005 with the frank and funny story of how he and Crick hit upon the structure of DNA and then goes on to talk about "what makes me tick now."
Online
2007