You searched for:

Subject
:
Heredity, Human
x
Subject
:
Medicine — Research
x
20 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Biotechnology [electronic resource]: Friend or Foe?

Genetic science holds the keys to life itself. How should this knowledge be used? Enhanced by outstanding 3-D computer animations and microscopic imaging, this engaging program featuring Dr. Cary Fowler, author of Shattering: Food, Politics, and the Loss of Genetic Diversity, takes a balanced look at the biotechnological revolution. Among the numerous topics surveyed are genetic engineering, cloning, gene therapy, genetically modified food crops, gene patenting, DNA fingerprinting, gene banks, and the use of transgenic animals for organ transplants. An overview of heredity, natural selection, and the mechanics of DNA is provided.
Online
2005; 2000
2.

Growing Synthetics [electronic resource]

Biogeneticists are engineering new yeasts and fungi as well as entirely new growing methods, and in the process are giving a new definition to the word "natural." If yeasts and fungi can turn decaying wood into sugar, why should humans not be able to grow ethanol cheaply and efficiently? This program follows the course of the research into the artificial culture of natural trees, as well as new methods of accelerating plant propagation and growth. The program demonstrates how extraordinarily effective gene-spliced bacteria can be-but how, if a mistake is made somewhere or somehow, we know of no way to undo the combination and bring the menacing new creation back into the test tube.
Online
2008
3.

Recombinant Technology [electronic resource]

The search for a magic bullet against cancer and AIDS is leading to recombinant technology-to explain the nature of the disease problem, help the body's immune system destroy the invader, and accelerate recovery from treatment. As more diseases are being nearly wiped out, more disease-resistant bacteria and viruses are turning up. Vaccine developers are using genetically-engineered vaccines to create more effective vaccines that are cheaper to grow and easier to deliver. The diseases for which vaccines are being sought range from AIDS to colon cancer; the longer-range goal is to understand the role of oncogenes in controlling growth, and therefore to solving the underlying problem of cancer itself.
Online
2008
4.

Superanimals, Superhumans? [electronic resource]

Now that we know that genes from different species are interchangeable, biotechnology is beginning to engineer superanimals-and patenting them. Behold the geep, part goat, part sheep, engineered to take advantage of the best traits of each. What are the scientific goals? And the social controls? This program looks at how some women are selecting the genetic profiles of the children they choose to bear, and at the ethical and economic dilemmas intrinsic in the question of who owns a person's DNA.
Online
2008
5.

Whither Biogenetics? [electronic resource]

The prospects of benefits from biotechnology are daunting-an end to disease, and to malnutrition and starvation-but equally daunting are the destructive ends to which biotechnology can be turned. More and better vaccines. An end to cancer, AIDS, and heart attacks. Cleaning up toxic wastes. These are the up side of biotechnology. The downside is the creation of dangerous and irreversible side-effects, the political use of genetic information, the development of bioweaponry, and the perversion of scientific breakthroughs to private gain. Who can foresee the future of biogenetics?
Online
2008
6.

Biomedicine and Biotechnology [electronic resource]

In the era of Big Pharma, why are researchers looking more and more to nature-and the human body itself-to provide tomorrow's medical cures? This program illustrates how scientists are growing and harvesting pharmaceuticals from common plants and farm animals, attempting to replicate organs, and transferring much-needed islet cells to patients with diabetes. The next big breakthrough in medical care is as likely to come from a rainforest or a goat as it is from a petri dish or a test tube.
Online
2006; 2004
7.

The Spark of Life [electronic resource]: Tinkering With the Genetic Toolbox

From hydras to humans, every organism on Earth can trace its ancestry back to the first primitive cell. Will biotechnology one day create a cell outside of that family tree? This program looks at 21st-century genetic science and its search for the secret of life's creation. Background information highlights the Oparin-Haldane Hypothesis and its vision of a prebiotic soup as well as Stanley Miller's famous experiment, the central role of RNA in protein synthesis, and Herbert Boyer's achievement in gene-splicing. A visit with Dr. Stephen del Cardayre of biotech start-up LS9 reveals ways to remodel an existing cell-while Dr. George Church of Harvard Medical School hints at building one from scratch.
Online
2010; 2009
8.

Unlocking the Code [electronic resource]: Genetics and Medicine

Although the impact of genetic research on human life is an ever-changing and often theoretical prospect, our current knowledge of the human genome already has direct, real-world applications. This program looks at several ways in which genetic breakthroughs have improved health care technology and enriched the study of human physiology. Case studies focus on DNA screening and its benefits-for both parents and children-in identifying hereditary problems, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease, and congenital and developmental abnormalities. The film also explores implications for type-2 diabetes, the complex area of multifactorial genetic disorders, the chain termination method of DNA sequencing, and more.
Online
2011
9.

Genetic Detectives [electronic resource]

Mapping the human genome was only the first step in the process of decoding our DNA-and that process is far from over. This film follows the work of genetic researchers as they press forward, slowly but surely, in the task of interpreting and understanding life's greatest enigma. Highlighting the surprising finding that the human genome contains only about 32,000 genes (pre-map predictions were in the hundreds of thousands), the program describes a growing interest among geneticists on proteins and their role in cellular processes. The overlap between genetics and cancer research, particularly the battle against breast cancer, is also a major topic, as is the use of Iceland's unique gene pool as a scientific resource. Eye-catching animation helps illustrate the complexities of DNA co [...]
Online
2011; 2002
10.

Attack of the Mutants [electronic resource]: Will Genetic Doping Replace Steroids?

In the not-so-distant future, athletes and other physically active people won't use needles, pills, or stick-ons for extra strength and endurance-those traits will be cultivated genetically. But one person's athletic utopia is another's sci-fi nightmare, and the World Anti-Doping Agency is already raising the alarm. This program examines the controversy in the wider context of biomedical advances as well as in the arena of sports. Featured case studies include gene therapy experiments with mice conducted by famed researcher Dr. Nadia Rosenthal and several other genetically relevant medical examples. Renowned geneticist Dr. Theodore Freidmann is also interviewed.
Online
2011; 2010
11.

Peas in a Pod [electronic resource]

Mapping the human genome is one achievement in a long line of scientific milestones. This intro-level program explores discoveries in the 18th and 19th centuries that gave birth to the science of genetics. Focusing on the work of Carl Linnaeus, Gregor Mendel, and Josef Kolreuter, the program shows how the basic laws of inheritance were established, highlighting the importance of Linnaean taxonomy and Mendel's revolutionary notion that there is a double set of genetic instructions. Detailed discussions of the four-letter genetic code, the concepts of phenotype and genotype, and Mendel's life and working methods are featured, along with an overview of the impact of genetic engineering.
Online
2006; 2003
12.

Microscopes and Mutants [electronic resource]

As the 19th century gave way to the 20th, genetics came into its own as a science. This intro-level program shows how the development of the microscope pushed genetic studies forward, and includes in-depth discussion of early cell theory, particularly the first observations of meiosis and mitosis. Exploring Thomas Morgan Hunt's findings involving Drosophila mutation, the program covers sex-linked inheritance, the discovery of the X and Y chromosomes in the early 1900s, chromosomal roles in the transmission of genetic material, the importance of gene-mapping, and ways in which the science of genetics has been co-opted, particularly in the dead-end study of eugenics.
Online
2006; 2003
13.

The DNA Obsession [electronic resource]

One of the most important stories in genetics is the race to understand DNA. This intro-level program guides viewers through that story, focusing on the biological and chemical processes central to the transfer of genetic material. Beginning in the middle of the 19th century, the program describes how competing scientists in Europe and America zeroed in on the DNA molecule and determined its structure. Friedrich Miescher's identification of "nuclein," Frederick Griffith's pneumococcus studies, Joshua Lederberg's analysis of bacteria reproduction, and James Watson and Francis Crick's double-helix configuration highlight the obsession, rivalry, and collaboration that drive scientific discovery.
Online
2006; 2003
14.

The Gene Machine [electronic resource]

Expanding on the subject of DNA, this intro-level program explores the central processes that govern the continuation of all life. Beginning with a discussion of Watson and Crick's pivotal 1953 paper describing the structure of DNA and its possible role in heredity, the program describes Crick's collaboration with Sydney Brenner in solving the DNA-to-protein puzzle and the role of RNA in protein synthesis. Mutagenic agents, restriction enzymes and plasmids, and the use of bacteria as model systems for genetic engineering are explored. The film also highlights the emergence of controversy resulting from genetic experimentation with higher organisms.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

The Seeds of a New Era [electronic resource]

Shedding light on today's biotech revolution, this intro-level program examines the controversies surrounding genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, specifically in agriculture. The program explains the process of modification using crown gall disease and Agrobacterium tumefaciens as models to demonstrate how genetic engineering works in plants. Marker genes, DNA constructs, promoters, ligase, restriction enzymes, and the real-world agricultural applications of transgenic plants are analyzed. The film clearly shows that, regarding the long-term use of GMOs and their products, farms are both working laboratories and ethical battlegrounds.
Online
2006; 2003
16.

Genetics, Stem Cells, and Society [electronic resource]: Interview With AlTrounson

One of Australia's most distinguished scientists, Dr. Alan Trounson administered early IVF fertility treatments and is now an internationally recognized leader in stem cell research. In this extended interview, he reflects on a range of research techniques and genetics issues-including gene expression and epigenetics; real-world applications for genetics and epigenetics; triggering differentiation; the use of adult rather than embryonic stem cells; developmental abnormalities and childhood cancers; genomics and cell biology; and the challenges and opportunities the field of genetics presents for young researchers. Dr. Trounson also describes his Cambridge education and how his career developed.
Online
2009; 2007
17.

Epigenetics [electronic resource]: How Food Upsets Our Genes

Why are girls entering puberty at progressively younger ages? Why are the rates of heart attack, cancer, and adult-onset diabetes rising? This program examines growing indications that food affects our genes-a concept vitally important to the science of epigenetics. Viewers encounter a wide range of experiments, case studies, and historical evidence, including Dutch birth records and testimonials from WWII that point to the epigenetic effects of starvation. Findings from animal and human nutritional studies, as well as evidence involving diet habits and environmental threats around the globe, are also presented. DNA methylation, the "on-and-off switch" of the epigenome, and other important concepts are featured.
Online
2009; 2008
18.

The Secret of Genes [electronic resource]

Longevity may or may not come from one's family tree-but with the help of science, could it one day be "inserted" into our genes? This program looks at research in genetic modification that might help extend human life spans. Spotlighting recent DNA experiments on the C. elegans worm, the program also describes longevity studies in mice, mollusks, and fungi-all of which shed light on possibilities for genetic alteration in humans. Students will learn about the roles played by mitochondria and free radicals while the genetic implications of diet and metabolism are also explored. Conclusions based on studies of Okinawan populations and the Biosphere 2 venture of the early 1990s are featured.
Online
2009; 2005
19.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Cynthia Kenyon, Experiments That Hint of Longer Lives

Researchers have found a genetic mutation that doubles the lifespan of roundworms; what may be even more important is that the elderly worms have as much vigor and reproductive potency as when they were younger, and are more resistant to age-related disease than are normally-aging worms. In this TEDTalk biochemist Cynthia Kenyon explains how the daf-2 mutation works to increase longevity in insects and mice, and its implications for human beings.
Online
2011
20.

The Allen Brain Atlas [electronic resource]: Quantum Leap in Neurological Research

With a 90 percent match between the mouse and human genomes, mice are helping researchers to better understand the human brain. In this NewsHour program, Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen-founder of the Allen Institute for Brain Science-and the Institute's chief scientific officer talk about the Allen Brain Atlas, an interactive 3-D map of gene expression in the mouse brain. Together with scientist Dave Anderson of Caltech, they discuss the concepts behind the Atlas and its creation. Susan Swedo, of the National Institute of Mental Health, adds, "It is exactly like having a Google for the mouse brain now." Research into autism with the help of this revolutionary gene map is already yielding valuable insights.
Online
2007; 2006