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1.

Hand-Me-Down Genes [electronic resource]: How Genes Work

Our body is composed of billions of cells, but how does each cell know what to become? This program starts with the nucleus of a single cell and then explains the other components the cell needs to function: chromosomes, genes, DNA, and ribosomes. From hair color to height, our genes determine who we are. This program explores, through animated graphics, all of the basic genetic building blocks and how they work.
Online
2006; 1997
2.

Hand-Me-Down Genes [electronic resource]: Family Patterns

When you look at a family photo, the resemblances, even across several generations, can be striking. What role do genes play, and why aren't siblings identical (and why are some)? This program explains how the formation of sex cells, from the first gamete to chromosome pairs, determines our genetic makeup. Deviations such as cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease, achondroplasia, Klinefelter syndrome, and Turner syndrome are also discussed.
Online
2006; 1997
3.

Selection in Action [electronic resource]: Natural Selection

This program provides arguments in favor of continental drift and the one-time existence of a supercontinent, shows how isolation can give rise to different species and how species develop in response to their environments, and explains clines and suggests the reason for their existence. After viewing the program, students should understand the significance of the continental drift theory, the purpose of studying inherited variation in isolated populations, and the conclusions about an isolated environment in a species' ancestry that can be drawn from the presence or absence of variation.
Online
2005; 1981
4.

The Demonic Ape [electronic resource]

By turns charming, alarming, and poignant, this program questions the accuracy of the human evolution theory. Chimpanzees show signs of sophisticated language, advanced social behavior, and other traits thought reserved only for humans-even empathy. No one knows this better than the legendary Jane Goodall: her pride and joy, Frodo, grew up in front of film cameras in Gombe in Tanzania for over 30 years. But Frodo's killing of a child in May 2002 prompted huge debate amongst scholars about whether the origins of aggressive male human behavior can be traced back to our shared evolutionary ancestry with chimps.
Online
2006; 2004
5.

The Kindness of Strangers [electronic resource]: Altruism and Human Nature

Dissecting the phenomenon of altruism-as well as its mirror image, the instinct of self-preservation-is perhaps best accomplished with real-world case studies. This program does so as it documents the aftermath of the 2004 Asian tsunami. Following four independent relief workers in the hardest-hit areas of Sri Lanka, the film captures scene after scene in which the most idealistic and pragmatic of aims are vividly juxtaposed. Meanwhile, experts in evolutionary biology, evolutionary psychology, and behavioral science-including Dr. Richard Dawkins, author of The Selfish Gene-illuminate the genetic, psychological, and socioeconomic concepts behind human cooperation and human survival.
Online
2010; 2006
6.

Did Cooking Make Us Human? [electronic resource]

The use of heat and utensils to process food may be more than a by-product of human evolution. According to theories presented in this program, cooking began much earlier than previously thought and ignited a series of changes that shaped our physical and mental abilities. Viewers visit South African caves containing evidence, including tools and charred bone material, that pushes back the timescale during which proto-humans began to hunt and tame fire. Meanwhile, several noted anthropologists share other ideas concerning the evolution of the human jaw, stomach, and cranium-asserting that the digestion of cooked meat instead of raw helped our ancestors build bigger brains.
Online
2010
7.

Unlocking the Code [electronic resource]: Genetics and Medicine

Although the impact of genetic research on human life is an ever-changing and often theoretical prospect, our current knowledge of the human genome already has direct, real-world applications. This program looks at several ways in which genetic breakthroughs have improved health care technology and enriched the study of human physiology. Case studies focus on DNA screening and its benefits-for both parents and children-in identifying hereditary problems, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease, and congenital and developmental abnormalities. The film also explores implications for type-2 diabetes, the complex area of multifactorial genetic disorders, the chain termination method of DNA sequencing, and more.
Online
2011
8.

The Book of Life [electronic resource]: Genetics and Evolution

Likening the beauty and complexity of DNA to an epic poem, this program revolves around the idea that we all carry the story of life on Earth in our genes, and that the similarities between species may play a more significant role in that story than previously thought. A visit to Iceland's hot springs reveals heat-, acid-, and salt-resistant organisms called Archaea-primordial versions of which may have set the stage for multi-cellular life. Moving to more advanced species, the film looks at bone-development genes in boa constrictors that are comparable to those of humans. Such parallels, the program says, indicate not only shared genetic origins but also the notion that particular clusters of genes are focal points of evolutionary importance.
Online
2011
9.

Are We Still Evolving? [electronic resource]

Assume, for the sake of argument, that our species has created everything it needs-all the comfort and protection that technology can provide. Does that mean our biological evolution has come to an end? Not necessarily, says anatomist and anthropologist Alice Roberts. In fact, technology may be driving human evolution, and at breakneck speed. Dr. Roberts meets scientists who are detecting and analyzing recent changes in the human genome and visits other researchers who have been able to, in effect, alter the development of some plant and animal species. In addition, the program examines the highly significant role of disease in evolution and the possibility that humanity could evolve into two distinct species.
Online
2011
10.

Did Darwin Kill God? [electronic resource]

In this program, philosopher and theologian Conor Cunningham argues that only extremist viewpoints-Creationism and ultra-Darwinism-make evolution and religion mutually exclusive. Experts from across the gamut of opinions frame the debate and trace its origins, including Father Gregory Tatum of the Ecole Biblique; University of Oxford historian Pietro Corsi; Darwin scholar Nick Spencer, author of Darwin and God; "Answers in Genesis" lecturer Terry Mortenson; Francis Collins, former director of the Human Genome Project; philosophers Daniel Dennett and Michael Ruse; Susan Blackmore, author of The Meme Machine; and University of Cambridge paleobiologist Simon Conway Morris.
Online
2010; 2009
11.

Journey of Man [electronic resource]: The Story of the Human Species

Fossil evidence more or less proves that humanity sprang from an African cradle. But what can the science of genetics tell us about our origins? Researchers have arrived at a startling conclusion: the global family tree can be traced to one African man who lived 60,000 years ago. Eminent geneticist Dr. Spencer Wells hosts this innovative program, traveling to every continent in search of the people whose DNA holds humanity's secret history: the Namibian Bushmen, the Chukchi reindeer herders of the Russian Arctic, Native American tribal groups, and indigenous Australians. The program also features commentary by historians, archaeologists, and anthropologists.
Online
2002
12.

Epigenetics [electronic resource]: The Hidden Life of Our Genes

How is it that the genetically identical clone of a tortoiseshell cat turned out to be a gray-striped tabby? The answer lies in epigenetics. This program presents evidence that DNA is not necessarily destiny, and that diet, stress, and environmental exposures can all modify gene expression. With commentary from experts, detailed animations of cell mechanics, and examples from everyday life, Epigenetics succeeds in delivering an informative and entertaining explanation of how cell memory, methylation, and RNA interference cause these changes to occur. The video also examines the role of epigenetics in stem cell function, and the promising developments the field holds for treating cancer and neurological disease.
Online
2009
13.

Darwin's Evolution [electronic resource]

As a naturalist aboard the HMS Beagle, a Royal Navy survey ship charting the coast of South America, Charles Darwin encountered evidence on the Galapagos Islands and elsewhere that encouraged him to question the biblical story of creation. This program explores the intellectual journey he undertook as a result. Presented by British scientist Adam Hart-Davis, the film invokes specimens in Great Britain's Natural History Museum, especially "Darwin's Finches," that were of fundamental importance to the naturalist's ideas; the two major components of his theory, common ancestry and natural selection; Darwin's sudden urgency regarding the publication of On the Origin of Species after Alfred Russel Wallace presented similar breakthroughs; Darwin's gradual confidence that evidence supportin [...]
Online
2002
14.

The Creationist Argument [electronic resource]

Luther Sutherland presents what he considers scientific-rather than philosophical or religious-inconsistencies in Darwin's theory which provide, he says, the scientific basis for discrediting the theory of evolution.
Online
2005; 1992
15.

The Evidence for Evolution [electronic resource]

Distinguished evolutionary biologists among the auditors of the foregoing lectures take on not only Luther Sutherland
Online
2010; 1992
16.

The Evolution of Human Purpose [electronic resource]

All other life forms except humans exist to propagate themselves and pass on their genes; humans alone work to other ends. In this lecture, Richard Dawkins distinguishes between the result of eons of natural selection which has resulted in, say, a bird's tail, whose purpose is to enable the bird to fly-purpose with a survival value-and deliberate design, like an airplane's tail. Dawkins shows the relationship between the two in explaining the evolution of human purpose.
Online
2010; 1992
17.

The Human Influence [electronic resource]

This program illustrates how natural selection works to enable a species to adapt to adverse environments; shows how human breeding of desirable varieties-which antedates by millennia any theories of genetics or evolution-often overrode natural selection; demonstrates how species can be changed by artificial selection and in response to human interference with the environment; and explains the desirability of preserving the gene pool. After viewing the program, students should understand how environmental changes and artificial selection alter the random variability in a population, how breeders strengthen rather than create variation, and why it is so important to preserve the gene pool.
Online
2005; 1988
18.

The Origins of Darwin's Theory [electronic resource]

Sir Andrew Huxley-grandson of Darwin's great defender, Thomas Huxley-describes Darwin's motivations, discoveries, and search for a logical theory to explain his observations of both geological and biological evidence in South America, focusing on Darwin's importance as the first to present strong, scientific evidence for descent with modification and to posit a plausible mechanism for its occurrence, namely natural selection.
Online
2008; 1992
19.

The Record of the Rocks [electronic resource]

This program shows the process of sedimentation, which has preserved those life forms extant at the time the rock was formed and-most strikingly where the Colorado River has cut through the Grand Canyon-exposes a veritable history of life on earth; presents the stratified evidence that simple organisms populated the earth first, followed by increasingly complex forms; demonstrates modern techniques for dating rock samples; and explains why fossils provide important evidence of the theory of evolution. After viewing the program, students should understand the mechanisms that made possible the Colorado River rock record, where the oldest and youngest rocks are and why, how the absolute age of rocks is determined, and the nature and extent of the record provided by rocks.
Online
2008; 1988
20.

The Theory of Inheritance [electronic resource]

Darwin's theory of natural selection, to be valid, required explanations for both the origin of variation and for the inheritance of variants. John Maynard Smith explains Lamarck's theory of the inheritance of acquired characteristics (in which Darwin believed), Weismann's theory of separate inheritance lines of germ and soma, Mendel's experiments and explanations, and the discovery of the role of DNA in the transmission of genetic information.
Online
2005; 1992