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1.

Immunizations [electronic resource]

Parents want their children to live happy and healthy lives. With help from the medical community this is possible. Immunizations at the appropriate points in a child's development can have lifelong benefits. This comprehensive program helps parents understand the need for vaccinations against disease, and explains how the vaccines work, and the results and reactions that may occur with each immunization. The proper immunization schedule is discussed as recommended by the American Pediatric Association. This program details the DPT (Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus) vaccine; the Hepatitis B vaccine; the Polio vaccine; the HIB (Haemophilus Influenza B) vaccine; and the MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) vaccine. Immunizations are undoubtedly the most significant contribution of science to th [...]
Online
2005; 1994
2.

Living With Today's Maladies [electronic resource]

Despite steady advances in medical science, there is still no end to the long list of illnesses in need of treatment. This program examines symptoms and risk factors associated with a wide variety of maladies, including those that derive from the stresses of modern living. Respiratory disorders, such as allergies and chronic bronchitis; neurological problems, including headaches, seizure disorders, and MS; gender-specific diseases; digestive disorders; musculoskeletal problems; and contemporary afflictions, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and repetitive stress injuries, are featured. Strategies for prevention and intervention are also explored.
Online
2006; 1998
3.

Reducing the Risks of Cardiovascular Disease [electronic resource]

According to current estimates, cardiovascular disease is responsible for more deaths each year than the next seven leading causes of death-combined. This program begins with a concise overview of how the heart and circulatory system function and why a healthy heart is so important to overall bodily health. Common heart- and circulatory system-related problems are then addressed, with an emphasis on pathology and long-term preventive and palliative measures. The major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the U.S. are also described, distinguishing between those that are controllable and those that are not.
Online
2006; 1998
4.

Diet-Related Disorders [electronic resource]: Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity, and Celiac Disease

This program examines three common diet-related disorders and their relationship to what people eat and drink. The causes, characteristics, and treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and celiac disease are discussed, along with strategies for their prevention. With an emphasis on breakfast, snacks, and gluten-free alternatives, students will learn how to eat without reaching for convenience foods, and that using a "traffic light" approach allows for the occasional treat. Balancing exercise with computer time is urged. An on-screen summary at the end of each segment makes this video an especially effective teaching tool.
Online
2010; 2009
5.

Esophageal Cancer [electronic resource]

In the past, esophageal cancer was linked to heavy smoking and drinking, but recent research points to a new culprit: acid reflux. This program examines the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of esophageal cancer. Case studies and commentary from leading medical experts in the field elucidate the causal chain between age; obesity; gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD; and Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. Gastroenterologists also discuss how long-term use of over-the-counter and prescription antacids can mask important warning signs of this disease.
Online
2009; 2007
6.

Teens and Tanning [electronic resource]: Sun Safety Update

This Telly Award-winning video outlines the dangers of overexposure to the sun, gearing its message toward teens of all backgrounds and ethnic groups who mistakenly think, "The more sun I get, the better I'll look." Dermatologist Carolyn Jacob explains what happens to the skin during sun exposure, describes different types of skin cancers, warns against the dangers of tanning beds, and offers tips on staying sun-safe. Correlates to all applicable National and State Educational Standards including the NCLB Act.
Online
2010; 2005
7.

Real Life Teens: Sexual Responsibility [electronic resource]

After watching this video, viewers will have a better understanding of what sexual responsibility means, as well as possible undesirable outcomes of reckless sexual activity. Subjects covered include sexual activity in the teen years, the dangers of unprotected sex, how sexually transmitted diseases spread, potential consequences of having many sex partners, syphilis and HIV/AIDS, and emotional and monetary ramifications of teen pregnancy.
Online
2008
8.

Pieces of Me [electronic resource]: The Preemptive Mastectomy Dilemma

Three Australian sisters have tested positive for BRCA2, an inherited gene disorder putting them at high risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer before age 50. This program follows them as they confront an arduous decision: whether to remove their breasts now while they are young and healthy or wait in fear for the disease to present itself. The film reveals the toll breast cancer can take while putting a human face on the impact of accelerating advances in genetic identification. Although new tests are saving lives, cures and treatments lag far behind or come only in the form of unthinkable procedures - as in the case of one sister who opts for a full prophylactic mastectomy. The other two struggle further with the decision-making process, in the shadow of their mother's own can [...]
Online
2008
9.

Dangerous Infections [electronic resource]

Health care-associated infections are getting a lot of profile in the hospital environment and rightfully so, says Peter Angood of The Joint Commission, a health care accreditation organization. "That's where the sickest patients come, that's where the most antibiotics are used, that's where the resistances begin to emerge." This program provides guidelines for people to follow when prescribed an antibiotic and explains ways that inpatients can lower the risk of contracting a hospital-acquired infection. The video also illustrates measures being taken by hospital personnel to keep their patients safe.
Online
2008
10.

Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Risk [electronic resource]

An increase in body weight has been associated with more than 60 chronic illnesses, says Louis Aronne, M.D., one of the world's foremost experts in obesity and author of the best-seller The Skinny. In this program, Dr. Aronne and other medical experts examine the links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease through case studies involving four middle-age patients-three male and one female. In addition, they discuss the importance of active patient participation in the management of diabetes through dietary planning, exercise, self-monitoring, and taking prescribed medication.
Online
2010
11.

Happier Women [electronic resource]: 25 Ways to Reduce Stress Video Clip Collection

Career issues, family crises, and medical problems can create an emotional overload. This collection of 25 video clips offers guidance, reassurance, and useful facts for busy women. With an average clip length of 90 seconds, the collection incorporates mini-case studies and commentary from experts - providing visual support for instructors and counselors who want to reach overworked, overscheduled learners. Topics cover health, parenting, business, and other areas.
Online
2009; 2008
12.

The Truth About Flu Vaccines [electronic resource]

No one enjoys getting a flu shot, but most people realize they need to. Vaccination, however, is not only vital for the individual but also for the well-being of friends, coworkers, and loved ones. This program corrects myths and misconceptions concerning influenza vaccines and explains who is most at risk for flu-related complications. Viewers learn about disease progression, courses of treatment, yearly genetic mutation of the virus, WHO surveillance team functions, vaccine shortages and production methods, and high-risk groups targeted for inoculations. Experts include Dr. Kathryn Edwards of Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Dr. Neil Silverman, UCLA School of Medicine. Two case studies are included.
Online
2009; 2008
13.

Food Poisoning [electronic resource]

Although the culprit behind food poisoning is often invisible to the eye, food-borne illnesses represent a colossal health issue spanning a wide range of problems and solutions. This program explores the causes of food contamination, the symptoms and ailments it produces, and the methods for preventing it. Viewers are introduced to bacteria, viruses, fungi, molds, and yeasts that threaten unsuspecting consumers, as well as dangerous cooking temperature ranges, proper time frames for food disposal, and common incubation periods for several microbe strains. Food allergens and non-microbial sources of contamination, such as pesticides and industrial waste, are also studied.
Online
2009; 2008
14.

Emerging Diseases [electronic resource]: Prions and Viruses

In an increasingly global society, disease outbreaks are on the rise-and so is the need for epidemiology expertise. This program introduces students to vital information regarding the transmission, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, vectors, prevention, and control of several communicable diseases. Students receive vital information on zoonotic diseases such as SARS, Rift Valley fever, and avian influenza, including steps typically taken to manage and mitigate the spread of these illnesses. Creutzfeld-Jacob disease is also discussed. An experienced virology specialist discusses the science behind each of these diseases and current efforts to combat them.
Online
2009; 2008
15.

Mesothelioma [electronic resource]: Hidden Threat

Prolonged exposure to asbestos-or, in some cases, even moderate contact-can lead to a devastating cancer called mesothelioma. This program examines the specific causes of the disease while presenting case studies involving a variety of patient experiences. Viewers learn how mesothelioma occurs when malignant cells form in the protective sac, or mesothelium, covering many internal organs. Dr. Harvey Paas of the NYU Langone Medical Center and Dr. John Costanzi of Lone Star Oncology Consultants explain diagnosis methods and newly developed treatments, while male and female patients describe the hazards that may have caused their cancers and what they are doing to survive and thrive.
Online
2009; 2008
16.

The Secret of Genes [electronic resource]

Longevity may or may not come from one's family tree-but with the help of science, could it one day be "inserted" into our genes? This program looks at research in genetic modification that might help extend human life spans. Spotlighting recent DNA experiments on the C. elegans worm, the program also describes longevity studies in mice, mollusks, and fungi-all of which shed light on possibilities for genetic alteration in humans. Students will learn about the roles played by mitochondria and free radicals while the genetic implications of diet and metabolism are also explored. Conclusions based on studies of Okinawan populations and the Biosphere 2 venture of the early 1990s are featured.
Online
2009; 2005
17.

Rays of Hope for the Brain [electronic resource]

How well do we understand the neurology of learning? Why does the brain's ability to learn diminish as we age? Can science find a way to extend brain "fitness," even for the very old? This program addresses those questions as it describes important medical experiments and studies. Topics include the central role of nerve cell connections in learning and cognitive development; cerebral plasticity, or the breakdown of unused connections; and growing evidence that plaque, diet, and poor blood circulation all "age" the brain. Tests at Germany's Max Planck Institute and the University of Zurich highlight comparisons between healthy and Alzheimer-afflicted brains while assessing the potential for an Alzheimer's vaccine.
Online
2009; 2005
18.

The Beauty and Burden of Hormones [electronic resource]

Are exercise and smart eating the best tools for staying youthful and attractive? Or is there a third ingredient in the fountain of youth-namely, clinical adjustments to the body's chemistry, perhaps with drugs derived from other creatures' hormones? This program examines the subject of hormone therapy and its link to longevity studies. Outlining the role hormones play in sexual attraction, the program describes the biological aspects of menopause; explains the use of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, or SNP, in treating testosterone decline; and shows how the use of horse estrogen has been discredited as a weapon against female aging. Research into soya and phytoestrogens is also featured.
Online
2010; 2005
19.

Travel Medicine [electronic resource]: Be Prepared

Travel abroad and even within the U.S. poses special health risks. In this program, Bradley Connor, of the International Society of Travel Medicine; Phyllis Kozarsky, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and others offer advice on protection from illness while traveling. Suggested pre-trip preparations include determining destination-specific health risks, obtaining requisite vaccinations, making a travel health kit, and creating a medical safety net at the destination, in case illness should strike. Information on venous thromboembolism, a risk factor of air travel, and health tips specifically for trips to developing countries are included.
Online
2007
20.

Migraines [electronic resource]

In terms of lost and reduced productivity, migraines cost U.S. employers more than
Online
2007