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1.

Appendicitis [electronic resource]

Appendicitis is swelling (inflammation) of the appendix. The appendix is a small pouch attached to the beginning of your large intestine. Appendicitis is one of the most common causes of emergency abdominal surgery in the United States. It usually occurs when the appendix becomes blocked by feces, a foreign object, or rarely, a tumor.
Online
2011
2.

Diarrhea [electronic resource]

Diarrhea means that you have loose, watery stools more than three times in one day. You may also have cramps, bloating, nausea and an urgent need to have a bowel movement. Causes of diarrhea include bacteria, viruses, parasites, certain medicines, food intolerances, and diseases that affect the stomach, small intestine, or colon. In many cases, no cause can be found.
Online
2011
3.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease [electronic resource]

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the esophagus (the tube from the mouth to the stomach). This action can irritate the esophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms.
Online
2011
4.

Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants [electronic resource]

Almost all children and adults have a little bit of reflux, often without being aware of it. When refluxed material rapidly returns to the stomach, it does not harm the esophagus. However, in some children, the stomach contents remain in the esophagus and damage the esophageal lining. In other children, the stomach contents go up to the mouth and are swallowed again. When the refluxed material passes into the back of the mouth or enters the airways, the child may become hoarse, have a raspy voice, or a chronic cough.
Online
2011
5.

Peptic Ulcer [electronic resource]

A peptic ulcer is a defect in the lining of the stomach or the first part of the small intestine, an area called the duodenum. A peptic ulcer in the stomach is called a gastric ulcer. An ulcer in the duodenum is called a duodenal ulcer.
Online
2011
6.

Stomach Ulcer [electronic resource]

A stomach ulcer is caused by an imbalance between acid and pepsin secretion and the defenses of the stomach mucosal lining. Ulcers can be treated through dietary changes and medication.
Online
2004
7.

Ulcers [electronic resource]

If the protective mucus lining of the stomach wall becomes too thin, acid can attack the wall, and an ulcer may form. Bleeding is a common symptom. Rarely, an ulcer will completely erode the stomach wall. Researchers think bacteria, not stress, often cause ulcers. Antibiotics can control these bacteria.
Online
2010
8.

Heartburn [electronic resource]

Heartburn has nothing to do with the heart. It's a pain in the chest and a burning sensation in the esophagus, near the heart. When you eat pizza, for example, it passes from your mouth to your esophagus and on to your stomach. The junction between your stomach and esophagus normally keeps food and stomach acid from coming back up. Certain foods can affect the junction, making it less effective. The mucous lining in your stomach protects the stomach wall from being attacked by the hydrochloric acid that breaks down food. The esophagus has no mucous lining to protect it. When food and stomach acid regurgitate into the esophagus, a burning feeling, called heartburn, results. An antacid relieves heartburn by making stomach acid less acidic.
Online
2010
9.

Nausea and Vomiting in Children [electronic resource]

At some point in their young lives, most children will experience nausea and vomiting - symptoms indicative of any number of potential issues. Nausea means having the urge to vomit and sometimes, though not always, occurs before vomiting. Younger children may not be able to describe nausea but will instead complain of a stomachache or other general malaise; they may feel dizzy or break out into a sudden sweat. This video teaches parents what to do when their child is suffering from nausea and vomiting.
Online
2009
10.

Diarrhea in Children [electronic resource]

This program helps parents know what to do when their child has diarrhea, which may be accompanied by abdominal pain, cramping, nausea, or vomiting. Importantly, the video advises against medication treatment unless it has been prescribed by a health care provider.
Online
2009
11.

Guts [electronic resource]

You may be pretty familiar with what you look like from the outside, but now presenter Michael Mosley gets up close and personal with his own digestive system to reveal what we look like inside. Guts uncovers the secret life of our digestive tract In an eye-opening and detailed exploration of a part of the body we normally never get to see. Using the latest in medical imagery and a tiny state of the art camera 'pill' that he swallows at the start of the film, Mosley takes viewers on a remarkable journey through his own internal system. At each stage he talks to medical experts and explains the amazing functions that happen without our conscious effort. This is one of the most fundamental parts of our bodies, controlled by its own nervous system and automatically providing our energy, [...]
Online
2012
12.

The Stomach and Intestines: Series 2 [electronic resource]

In this episode, Dr. Alice Roberts uses dissection, drawing, and some unusual tests to reveal where the stomach and intestines are, how big they are, and how best to look after them. Dr. Roberts is joined by Lesley Love, a 40-year-old estate agent whose diet is based almost entirely on chocolate and cheese. The doctor embarks on a mission to impress upon her the need for more fruit and vegetables. She reveals that it is normal to defecate as seldom as once every three days or as often as three times a day. It is important to be aware of one's bowel habits and take notice of any changes, as these can be signs of bowel cancer.
Online
2008
13.

Controlling Irritable Bowel Syndrome [electronic resource]

It can appear in almost anyone at any age, yet many people are too embarrassed to seek treatment for this common medical disorder. Symptoms related to irritable bowel syndrome affect every aspect of the lives of millions of American men and women. This program provides an overview of IBS, touching on common triggers and explaining its often-misunderstood brain-gut connection. Dr. Alexis Nees describes the onset, progression, and diagnosis of IBS as experienced when she herself acquired the condition, and patients discuss how they have learned to better control their flare-ups.
Online
2012
14.

Stomach Ulcer [electronic resource]

A stomach ulcer is caused by an imbalance between acid and pepsin secretion and the defenses of the stomach mucosal lining. Ulcers can be treated through dietary changes and medication.
Online
2004
15.

Appendectomy [electronic resource]

Appendectomy is a common surgical procedure - the removal of the appendix, a blind-ended tube located near the junction of the small and the large intestines. It is performed to treat appendicitis, a very common yet serious disorder in which the appendix becomes infected. This program helps patients understand appendectomy - and why immediate action often proves necessary. The video covers risks and complications while offering tips for at-home recovery and knowing when to call the doctor.
Online
2010
16.

Cholecystectomy [electronic resource]

Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, performed in the event of cholelithiasis, or when the gallbladder has formed stones. These stones can block the duct leading from the gallbladder to the common bile duct, which results in cholecystitis, an often painful infection. This program explains when gallbladder removal would be recommended. The video features 3-D animations and straightforward explanations to help patients fully understand the procedure, risks and complications, recovery, and when to call the doctor.
Online
2010
17.

Celiac Disease [electronic resource]

Nearly three million Americans suffer from celiac disease, a hereditary, autoimmune digestive disorder which is difficult to diagnose. Discover how a gluten-free diet (no wheat, rye, or barley) results in greatly improved health for those suffering from this disease.
Online
2010