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1.

Dead Men's Tales [electronic resource]

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Uses archaeological, forensic and historical methods to learn about the Jamestown Colony, mummies found in the Xinjiang Province of China, the truth to the legend of Wild Bill Longley, the burials and lives of the people who built the pyramids, and the evacuation of a 13th century palace in South Africa.
Online
2005; 2001
2.

Genocide [electronic resource]: From Biblical Times Through the Ages

Although the term "genocide" was coined by humanitarian Rafael Lemkin in reference to the Turkish expulsion and slaughter of Armenians in the early 20th century, the phenomenon is as old as civilization. In this program, a variety of experts analyze Biblical accounts and some of the earliest documented examples of genocide, as in the Athenian siege of Milos in 416 BC, to explore the psychology that motivates such violence. This grim survey of history looks at the extermination of Tasmanians, Native Americans, Namibia's Herero tribe, and the Armenians. Guests include Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel, Executive Director of Amnesty International USA William Schulz, and David Scheffer, U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes.
Online
2005; 2001
3.

Genocide in the First Half of the 20th Century [electronic resource]

State-sanctioned violence has always existed, but technological advances have facilitated its use as a viable means of exerting political power. This program continues the examination of the history of genocide, focusing on the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot, the 1923 Rosewood Massacre, Stalin's forced Ukrainian famine, the Japanese Rape of Nanking, and the Holocaust. A host of survivors, experts, and scholars include Martha Barnett, president of the American Bar Association; Eddie Faye Gates; Iris Chang, author of The Rape of Nanking; Yehuda Bauer, director of the Yad Vashem International Institute for Holocaust Research; and Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel.
Online
2005; 2001
4.

Never Again? Genocide Since the Holocaust [electronic resource]

After the atrocities of World War II, the cry of conscience was "never again!" As this program demonstrates, that bitterly learned injunction went unheeded throughout much of the world. The chronicle of genocide continues with a look at Mao's purges in China, Cambodia under Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge, the Arab/Israeli conflict, border wars in Pakistan and Bangladesh, and killing in Central America. Guests include Dr. Ben Kiernan, Genocide Studies Program director at Yale University; Pierre-Richard Prosper, Special Counsel and Policy Advisor to U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues; and Sophal Leng Stagg, Cambodian survivor and author of Hear Me Now: Tragedy in Cambodia.
Online
2005; 2001
5.

Genocide [electronic resource]: Horror Continues

The late 20th century produced a sinister euphemism: "ethnic cleansing." This program concludes a comprehensive survey of genocide by looking at the most recent examples in Iraq, Iran, and Turkey; Burundi and Rwanda; the former Yugoslavia; Indonesia and East Timor; and Chechnya. The role and efforts of the United Nations are discussed as well as what the future holds in trying to prevent genocide. Among many scholars, experts, and survivors interviewed are Jamsheed Marker, former U.S. Ambassador and negotiator to East Timor; Gregory H. Stanton, director of Genocide Watch; and Joseph Mutaboba, Rwandan Ambassador to the UN.
Online
2005; 2001
6.

Torture [electronic resource]: We Have Ways of Making You Talk

Examining the use of torture over the past half-century, this program describes its horrific application in military and political settings and explores its profound human cost. Featuring interviews with confessed practitioners of the gruesome craft, the program exposes interrogation methods developed and carried out by French army officers against Algerian independence fighters, by British police against the IRA, by American troops against the Viet Cong, and other shocking occurrences in South America and South Africa. The employment of physical and psychological abuse as a weapon against guerilla and opposition groups parallels current dilemmas in Iraq and at Guantanamo Bay.
Online
2006; 2005
7.

Abu Ghraib [electronic resource]: Torturer's Tale

Javal Davis was imprisoned for assaulting inmates at Abu Ghraib, but insists he is not a torturer. His fellow MP Ken Davis was never implicated, having reported the abuse to superiors. This program presents in-depth interviews with both men, detailing their side of the story and conveying their disillusionment with Pentagon officials who wanted interrogations pushed "up a notch." Featuring nightmarish descriptions and images from inside the prison-highlighting deplorable conditions endured by inmates and guards alike-the program also includes insight into the mentality of reservist Charles Graner, currently serving a 10-year sentence for Abu Ghraib torture.
Online
2006; 2005