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1.

Claridge's [electronic resource]

Founded in 1812 and expanding in size and reputation throughout the 19th century, Claridge's Hotel in London's Mayfair underwent an Art Deco makeover during the 1930s, which loosened it from its Victorian trappings and reaffirmed its status as a fashionable destination for the rich and famous. This program goes inside Claridge's for an in-depth look at its stunning Deco environment. Viewers experience the hotel's legendary fumoir, the smoking room where cigarettes were glamorous even for staid British women, and the cocktail bar according to Guy Oliver, the man whose job it is to renovate and restore the hotel's glamorous 1930s image. Also not to be missed: a perfect Art Deco bath complete with glass panels, sleek tile molding, and two bell pulls-one for the maid and the other for th [...]
Online
2011
2.

London Transport [electronic resource]

Designed by the architect Charles Holden, whose early works were influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, the Underground Electric Railways Company headquarters began construction in the late 1920s and soon became the highest skyscraper in London. This program uncovers the story of a building so controversial that UERL general manager Frank Pick, who commissioned Holden, offered to resign. The new structure, however, would eventually serve as the hub of an Art Deco transformation of the Underground. Venturing out on the Piccadilly Line to Southgate, viewers find themselves part of not just a crowded rush hour migration but a coordinated journey through an enchanting Deco landscape. The sleek tube station contains streamlined features, sensuous chrome, and soft uplighting for a gla [...]
Online
2011
3.

The Orient Express [electronic resource]

Embarking at London's Victoria Station, this program offers adventure and visual delight aboard one of the most storied passenger trains of all time-the Orient Express. Viewers meet James Sherwood, an American who bought two of the original Orient Express carriages in 1977 and decided to restore them, as he eventually would an entire line of sleeper, restaurant, and Pullman cars, to their long-lost Art Deco glory. After surveying the luxury of the dining compartment the program reveals an equally splendid sleeping cabin, showing what wealthy riders would have experienced as the train chugged through the Alps. And in the spirit of international travel, Bevis Hillier, the historian who helped coin the phrase Art Deco, describes the rapid spread of the movement from its origins at a Fre [...]
Online
2011
4.

John Maynard Keynes and Keynesianism [electronic resource]

If anyone comes close to rivaling Winston Churchill as the central figure in modern British history, it is John Maynard Keynes. He is often credited with, among other things, helping to save capitalism from the Great Depression, ensuring that the war against the Nazis was properly funded, and building postwar decades of growth and prosperity. Today his ideas remain crucial to the critical debate of our time: should governments borrow and spend their way out of a global economic crisis or slash their budgets and reduce their national debts? With contributions from some of the world's leading economic thinkers, including a Nobel laureate and the governor of the Bank of England, this program examines the Keynesian economic vision - acknowledging the ongoing controversies around it while [...]
Online
2012
5.

Yellow Wasps [electronic resource]: Anatomy of a War Crime

In this classic program Serbian journalist Jovan Dulovic investigates the 1992 ethnic cleansing of a Bosnian Muslim city by the Yellow Wasps, a Serbian paramilitary group, and the subsequent war-crimes tribunal that failed to hold the Yellow Wasps responsible. Survivors of the attack offer their recollections of what happened, while the Yellow Wasps' leader says that Muslim extremists provoked the Serbs' violent assaults against the Bosnians. The weak response of the international community to reports of Serbian-controlled concentration camps is also examined, with commentary from former UN Special envoy José Maria Mendiluce and others.
Online
1996
6.

Casa del Rio [electronic resource]

When British industrialist Walter Price visited California in the 1930s, he was so impressed by Pickfair - the glamorous residence of Hollywood stars Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford - that he decided to construct his own Art Deco mansion back in the Devon countryside. This program examines Price's luxurious creation, a palace fit for Tinseltown complete with a marble staircase built to look like a piano keyboard. Casa del Rio, as Price christened it, also features smaller but no less intriguing accoutrements - Art Deco gadgets such as Bakelite radios and toasters that were cutting-edge for the time. A bar, pool room, and cinema were added later, but with the original Pickfair mansion no longer extant, Casa del Rio stands as a rare example of a fantasy house from the height of Eng [...]
Online
2011
7.

Memories of Anne Frank [electronic resource]

In this program filmed in the Franks' apartment and the building that housed the Opecta offices and the Franks' secret refuge, Miep Gies vividly recounts her experiences: working for Otto Frank; bringing food to the fugitives; the chilling expose of the hidden Jews and their protectors; the liberation of Amsterdam; Otto Frank's return from Auschwitz; and the publication of Anne's diary. Archival photographs and film footage depict life in wartime Holland, while Miep's recollections and excerpts from Anne's diary reveal the details of a life in hiding-and provide compelling new insights into Anne's personality.
Online
1998
8.

Sarajevo Diaries [electronic resource]

At the beginning of the siege of Sarajevo in April 1992, SaGA became a place of assembly of intellectuals, film professionals, artists and students, who, despite the war, stayed in Sarajevo to preserve their way of life. From the start of the war, SaGa's teams were shooting everyday life in the streets of Sarajevo. During the siege of Sarajevo, there were more than 60 documentaries made. This episode takes a look at some of the videos The New York Times has called "part news, part horror movie" as well as a video report on musicians gathering in Sarajevo to bring attention to the Bosnian crisis. Also featured are reports on Prague's neo-Nazi skinheads; environmental protection in Haiti and Brazil; the distribution of cameras to human rights activists; and on Kosovo.
Online
1993
9.

Kosovo [electronic resource]: The Next Bosnia?

Albanians had coexisted within the Ottoman Empire for centuries while the Serbians in the region emigrated to areas under control of the Habsburgs. Upon the dissolution of the empire, the country of Albania was formed, but over two million Albanians resided throughout the rest of the Balkans. Kosovo had the largest portion of Albanians, and the area was finally granted broad autonomy by the former Yugoslavia in 1974. The rise of Serbian nationalism in the late 1980s, bolstered by expounded propaganda about Albanian oppression of Serbs in Kosovo, led to the annexation of Kosovo by Serbia in 1989. This episode surveys the resistance by ethnic Albanians against Serbian occupation. Also included are reports on Haitian prisoners held by the U.S. in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; U.S. immigration p [...]
Online
1993
10.

Norgono/Serbia [electronic resource]

Featuring American journalist and NPR and PBS foreign correspondent, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this classic program examines human rights in the Norgono region of the South Caucasus and in Serbia.
Online
1993
11.

Sarajevo Part 1 [electronic resource]: Ground Zero

During the siege of Sarajevo, everyday life was not just challenging, it became deadly for far too many residents. Mass killings from mortar fire occurred while people stood in line for water, attended a football game, or shopped at the market. City streets became known as "Sniper Alleys." SaGA (Sarajevo Group for Artists) had film crews throughout the city to record life in a city under siege. This episode features highlights from the more than 60 documentaries that were made during the height of the horror. Director Ademir Kenoic offers a chilling look at what life was like during that time.
Online
1993
12.

Human Rights in Northern Ireland [electronic resource]

In 1921 the six counties of Northern Ireland were partitioned from the twenty-six counties of the south. A Protestant, unionist dominated parliament was established in 1922. Its policies in the areas of housing, employment, and voting rights, discriminated against the Catholic population. Subsequent protests and preemptively violent responses from the local security eventually led to the murder of thirteen demonstrators in the incident known as Bloody Sunday. This episode examines the continuing conflict and its social and economic impacts. Andrew Tyndall reports on why the media are more interested in the troubles of the British Royals than "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland. New York Times reporter John Burns also features an interview with Irish politician and activist Bernadette [...]
Online
1994
13.

Mama Illegal [electronic resource]: Undocumented in Western Europe

Putting their trust and safety in the hands of illicit traffickers, three mothers from a bleak Moldovan village make their way to Austria and Italy, where they find work as cleaners or care workers. This film depicts seven years in the lives of Raia, Aurica, and Natasa-vulnerable lives that are lived underground, without valid documents, without health care, without the comforting presence of loved ones. Diligent and careful, each woman sends what little remains of her hard-earned Western money home to her family. But there is an unexpected, paradoxical price to these plans for a brighter future: never fully "arriving" and gaining acceptance in the West, each worker finds, when her self-exile has ended, that she has become alienated from her own children and husband. The economic bar [...]
Online
2011
14.

Ethnic Fault Lines in Europe [electronic resource]: Voices of Human Rights

Since the fall of the Austro-Hungarian empire after World War I, Hungary has had to deal with fascist hate groups. Siding with the Axis powers during World War II legitimized the pogroms against the Roma and Jewish populations during that time. The collapse of the Hungarian communist system in the early 1990s, and the ensuing social and economic instability, has led to the rise of these groups yet again. This episode examines their actions against the Jews and Gypsies of Hungary. Philanthropist George Soros discusses his human rights work in Hungary and throughout Eastern Europe. Also featured are reports on anti-war activists in Belgrade, Serbia; medical relief for Cuba; human rights heroes being honored in Washington, D.C.; and excerpts from films shown at the Human Rights Watch Fi [...]
Online
1993
15.

Ethnic Fault Lines Revisited [electronic resource]

Although internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan, Nogorno-Karabakh is a de facto, but unrecognized, state in the South Caucasus. In February 1988, the parliament voted to secede from Azerbaijan and unite with Armenia, igniting armed conflict. Charges of ethnic cleansing have been leveled on both sides. This episode details the events and their impact on the population. Also included are reports on Cambodia, Guatemala, and a large Muslim enclave in Serbia that has been spared the horrors of ethnic cleansing - until now. Finally, a music video of Luis de la Guerra performing "El Costa de la Vida" is highlighted.
Online
1993
16.

The Media and Human Rights [electronic resource]

A drop in popularity of the Hungarian conservative political party Fidesz led to charges of liberal bias on the part of the media there. The media became a scapegoat for the defeat of the party in the 1994 parliamentary elections. This episode explores the lack of media independence in post-communist Hungary and the neo-conservative's attempt to control public television and radio. Andrew Tyndall reports on how the media covers itself. Also featured are reports on the growing number of journalists who are killed while on assignment and a profile of Belgrade's B-92, a radio station that mixes music with anti-war activism in Serbia's capital.
Online
1994
17.

Chechnya [electronic resource]

Sergei Kovalev was serving as Boris Yeltsin's human rights advisor when he publicly opposed Russia's military involvement in Chechnya. He cooperated with the rebels and urged Russian soldiers to give up. In this episode, he discusses the ongoing conflict along with Ludmilla Thorne of Freedom House. Also featured are a video diary from Tomas Goltz on the town of Samashki and its efforts to defend itself from the Russian army's assault, and an exclusive interview with Fred Cuny. The disaster relief specialist and human rights hero traveled to Chechnya in 1995 where he disappeared and is presumed dead.
Online
1996
18.

Safe Havens: Part 1 [electronic resource]

In April 1993, the United Nations declared the besieged enclave of Srebrenica a safe area under UN protection. In spite of its status the town was surrounded and fell to the Bosnian Serb army in July, 1995. What followed was the worst crime on European soil since World War II. Eight thousand people - mostly men and boys - were massacred, while women, children, and the elderly were forced to leave their homes and were sent to Tuzla. This episode examines the fall of the town and whether UN officials were complicit in the slaughter and displacement of thousands of innocent civilians.
Online
1996
19.

Goldman Sachs and the Decline of Greece [electronic resource]

Over more than a decade, America's top investment bank provided risky financial products that sent the Greek government further and further into debt. Goldman Sachs earned hundreds of millions on the deal while the position of Greece within the European Union became untenable. Traveling to New York, London, and Athens, this film reveals what happened and examines the devastating consequences in present-day Greece. Viewers learn how, even as the Greek debt edged closer to 60 percent of the nation's GDP (the limit set in the Maastricht Treaty of 1992), both Goldman Sachs and the Greek government continued with "business as usual," and how Eurostat, the EU's statistics office in Brussels, was informed about these instances of financial engineering and raised no objections. The film also [...]
Online
2012
20.

Made in Germany [electronic resource]: Europe's Economic Superstar

It's almost miraculous: a few scant decades ago, what is now the world's fourth-largest economy was brutally split in two. Today, all of Europe looks to Germany for answers. This documentary examines the nation's economic, social, and cultural power-how it developed at the dawn of the 21st century and how it will continue to shape the EU and the world. Factors for viewers to consider include a national focus on work and industry that values family businesses, solid professional training, and lifetime employment within the same company; environmental policies that emphasize sustainable, efficient energy sources such as solar and wind, enabling even small towns and villages to profit; and an ongoing faith in economic pillars such as Volkswagen, whose Glass Factory in Dresden serves as [...]
Online
2012