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2.

The Age of Stupid

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Pete Postlethwaite (the only fictional character) stars as an archivist living alone in the devastated future world of 2055, who spends his days looking at old footage from the years leading up to 2015 when a cataclysmic climate change took place. As he sifts through the relics of our lost and misguided civilization, the archivist asks why Earth's inhabitants did nothing to reverse the effects of climate change while they still had the chance.
DVD
2010
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Earth Keepers

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This documentary traces the quest of Mikael Rioux, a young activist from Trois-Pistoles, Quebec. Eighty-year-old Christian de Laet, a pioneering Canadian environmentalist, Rioux's guide and mentor, urges him to go and meet visionary men and women implementing innovative projects for the future of society. Viewers can access entire 43 min. film or choose to enter the film based on topical information in the menu.
DVD
2010
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

The First Millimeter: Healing the Earth

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"An inspiring groundbreaking documentary filmed around the world exploring the solution to global warming, an answer that saves money, our food supply and most likely our children's lives. This is a story about hope. This is a story about how to use the tools we have to heal what we all depend on to survive: the Earth." -- Amazon.
DVD
2009; 2008
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

The Next Industrial Revolution: William McDonough, Michael Braungart & the Birth of the Sustainable Economy

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Tells the story of the movement led by architect Bill McDonough and chemist Michael Braungart to bring together ecology and human design. Explores how businesses are transforming themselves to work with nature and profitability.
DVD
2001
Clemons (Stacks)
6.

State of the Planet

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Deforestation, global warming, depletion of aquifers, rising sea levels, and mass extinctions--how much longer can Earth compensate for these damaging forces? In this timely three-part series, David Attenborough and some of the world's leading experts on environmental matters consider probably the most important issue of the 21st century: the future of life on this planet.
VHS
2001; 2000
Ivy (By Request)
7.

The Living Planet: A Portrait of the Earth

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Host David Attenborough visits the great environmental regions of the planet to examine how plants and animals adapt to their surroundings and how otherwise unrelated organisms, molded by similar conditions, develop similar techniques for solving problems of survival.
VHS
1991; 1987
Ivy (By Request)
8.

Where the Green Ants Dream

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Bruce Spence plays a sympathetic geologist for a uranium mining company who must confront the passive resistance of the Aborigine tribes. The spots where the deposits are richest is sacred ground, the place "where the green ants dream" for them the origin of all life.
VHS
1985
9.

Bill Moyers Reports [electronic resource]: Earth on Edge

Filmed in collaboration with the World Resources Institute, this Bill Moyers program assesses the state of the environment. Combining interviews with leading scientists and reports from Mongolia, British Columbia, Brazil, South Africa, and the state of Kansas, Moyers and his team of award-winning producers explore the impact that human activities have had on the planet while posing an urgent question: What is happening to Earth's capacity to support nature and civilization? Computer graphics enhance this gripping documentary.
Online
2005; 2001
10.

Green Pacts and Greenbacks [electronic resource]

Environmental protection laws have spawned a whole new form of business: firms that specialize in handling ecological regulatory issues for industry. To what extent are environmental standards achieving the goal of purifying America's air, land, and water? And to what extent are those selfsame standards contributing to the growth of a market geared toward simply meeting the legal minimums in order to avoid penalties? In this program, Betsy Taylor, executive director of the Center for a New American Dream, and environmentalists Dr. Calvin DeWitt and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., explore the business behind doing business the Earth-friendly way.
Online
2006; 2000
11.

Water for the Fields [electronic resource]

No matter where on Earth, the one human activity that consumes the most water is the one that wastes the most: agriculture. From locations around the world, this program surveys both disasters of agricultural irrigation, such as cotton farming in Uzbekistan, and innovative successes in water-efficient techniques and crops, such as in California and India. Numerous examples illustrate the destructive effects of deforestation and overgrazing, the difficulty of fighting erosion and reclaiming arable soil, and the urgency of the motto: more crop per drop.
Online
2006; 2003
12.

Water for the Cities [electronic resource]

This program takes a hard look at the mounting challenge of providing millions of people in urban areas with potable water and adequate disposal of waste water. To highlight the difficulties, segments focus on the water problems of the megalopolis, cities with populations of over ten million people, such as Lagos, Jakarta, and Mexico City. The massive logistics that enable Las Vegas to prosper in the middle of a desert are also explored.
Online
2006; 2003
13.

Testing the Limits of Possibility [electronic resource]: Massive Dams and Waterworks

When it comes to water management, many politicians and technocrats have felt that colossal problems are only solved by colossal projects: dams. But blind faith in concrete can often have devastating effects on communities and the environment. This program examines the positive and negative impact, as well as the politics and economics of several ongoing or proposed projects: China's Three Gorges Dam, Egypt's Mubarak pumping station, pit-mine reclamation in Germany's Lausitz region, and Spain's controversial national hydrological plan for the Ebro river.
Online
2006; 2003
14.

Water for Profit [electronic resource]

The moment demand outpaces supply, water becomes a commodity to be traded in the global market. But who owns the rights to water? And how can a price be set on water? In this program, the pros and cons of privatization are assessed in a number of water management situations around the world: Aguas Argentina in Buenos Aires; the Bechtel corporation in Cochabamba, Bolivia; Thames Water company in Jakarta; and a public/private test partnership in Albania. Corporate representatives, anti-privatization activists, farmers, and industry experts offer commentary from all sides of the issue.
Online
2006; 2003
15.

Waters of Discord [electronic resource]

Almost half the world gets its drinking water from rivers that cross national boundaries. Analysts predict that more wars will be fought over water than oil. This program surveys a number of active or potential hot spots: Israel and the river Jordan; the Southeastern Anatolia Project in Turkey and its effects on Syria and Iraq; Egypt's Toshka Canal and the Nile Basin Initiative; and the Tehri dam in India. The program also looks at the effects of the Hoover dam on the Colorado River delta in Mexico and the success of Lesotho's Katse dam. Vandana Shiva, author of Water Wars, discusses many of these situations.
Online
2006; 2003
16.

Watery Visions [electronic resource]: Is the Future Potable?

In a dramatic reversal of policy since apartheid, South Africa has become a model of water fulfillment. Despite being one of the driest regions on Earth, India's Rajasthan is an oasis due to the revival of a system of ancient rain basins. This program looks at these encouraging examples to show how sustainable solutions to long-term water management can be achieved, while a visit to Sertao in Brazil illustrates the appalling alternative-two very different futures.
Online
2006; 2003
17.

Boiling Point [electronic resource]: Global Struggle for Water

Competition for freshwater is heating up. Is war inevitable, or is a peaceful solution possible? This program spotlights three trouble spots that epitomize the intensifying crisis and efforts being made to manage it: the Okavango, where a commission formed by Angola, Namibia, and Botswana is trying to resolve the conflict that is endangering the river's unspoiled waters; the Rio Grande, where an aging water-sharing treaty and ever-greater demands for water leave farmers on both sides of the divide with little hope; and the West Bank, where Palestinian rainwater reservoirs and the Israeli water grid are dangerous points of contention between the two peoples.
Online
2006; 2002
18.

Regionalization / Solid Waste Management Success Stories [electronic resource]

With more than half of America's landfills already closed, it is predicted that 22 states will soon run out of landfill capacity. Episode one of this program presents regionalization, the pooling of municipal resources across political boundaries, as a partial solution. Environmental project specialist Elizabeth Tarver, representatives of BFI and Waste Management, and others address topics such as creating economies of scale, gaining political buy-in, and developing partnerships between the public and private sectors. Episode two, a summary of the series, features notable successes in diverting recyclables, greenwaste, and special waste from the municipal solid waste stream.
Online
2008; 1999
19.

Scientific Spin Doctors [electronic resource]

For centuries, people have counted on science to provide them with objective answers to questions about the world of nature. But on pressing environmental issues such as global warming and ozone depletion, some special interest groups are striving to bend science to their agendas. Spinning data into webs of rhetoric, such groups run the risk of creating more confusion than clarity, fostering a paralysis of public opinion and environmental policy. This program, featuring environmentalist Dr. Calvin DeWitt of the University of Wisconsin, considers the consequences of exploiting science to shape public policy.
Online
2006; 2000
20.

Brownfield Basics [electronic resource]

After addressing terms and concepts essential to an understanding of brownfields, this program turns to author Storm Cunningham and Robert Colangelo, executive director of the National Brownfields Association, for historical background on the problem. In addition, nationally recognized experts Charles Bartsch and Ira Whitman discuss legislation that led to the Brownfields Revitalization Act of 2002, and City of Phoenix brownfields coordinator Rosanne Sanchez talks about her work with community leaders, state officials, and private developers. Produced by John W. Sutherlin, Ph.D.
Online
2006; 2004