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1.

A Class Divided [electronic resource]

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Documents a reunion of Iowa teacher Jane Elliott and her third-grade class of 1970, subjects that year of an ABC News television documentary entitled "The eye of the storm". Shows how her experimental curriculum on the evils of discrimination had a lasting effect on the lives of the students. Includes scenes of her lesson being used in a prison setting.
Online
2005; 1985
2.

As American as Public School [electronic resource]: 1900-1950

In 1900, 6% of America's children graduated from high school; by 1945, 51% graduated and 40% went on to college. This program recalls how massive immigration, child labor laws, and the explosive growth of cities fueled school attendance and transformed public education. Also explored are the impact of John Dewey's progressive ideas as well as the effects on students of controversial IQ tests, the "life adjustment" curriculum, and Cold War politics. Interviews with immigrant students, scholars, and administrators provide a portrait of America's changing educational landscape in the first half of the 20th century.
Online
2005; 2000
3.

A Struggle for Educational Equality [electronic resource]: 1950-1980

In the 1950s, America's public schools teemed with the promise of a new, postwar generation of students, over half of whom would graduate and go on to college. This program shows how impressive gains masked profound inequalities: seventeen states had segregated schools; 1% of all Ph.D.s went to women; and "separate but equal" was still the law of the land. Interviews with Linda Brown Thompson and other equal rights pioneers bring to life the issues that prompted such milestones as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
Online
2005; 2000
4.

A History of Education [electronic resource]

Plato's academy was the first formal arena for education, where young men were tutored in the rigors of logic, philosophy, and mathematics. Prior to this, societies transmitted knowledge from one generation to the next orally, and after the advent of writing, through texts. Although education throughout history has been predominantly a privilege of the elite, universal education is currently seen as a basic right, necessary for a country's prosperity. This program traces the evolution of education through the ages, from oral traditions to its role in today's ever-changing society, where the need to learn new job skills is a constant necessity.
Online
2006; 1999
5.

The Bottom Line in Education [electronic resource]: 1980 to the Present

In 1983, the Reagan Administration's report, A Nation at Risk, shattered public confidence in America's school system and sparked a new wave of education reform. This program explores the impact of the "free market" experiments that ensued, from vouchers and charter schools to privatization-all with the goal of meeting tough new academic standards. Today, the debate rages on: do these diverse strategies challenge the founding fathers' notions of a common school, or are they the only recourse in a complex society?
Online
2005; 2000
6.

Identity Crisis [electronic resource]: Self-Image in Childhood

What shapes a child's identity-situation and surroundings, or unchangeable factors within the child? This program weighs in on that question by capturing the emotional and psychological development of 25 boys and girls at age five. In fascinating and sometimes disturbing scenes, the children reveal clear signals about their self-worth and their expectations for the future that bear strong connection to nationality, gender, skin color, economic class, and the presence or absence of either parent. Powerful in its social implications as well as its emotional impact, Identity Crisis brings vital documentation to the nature vs. nurture debate.
Online
2006; 2005
7.

Intifada NYC [electronic resource]: The Khalil Gibran Academy and Post-9/11 Politics

In 2007, the first Arabic language public school in the U.S. opened in New York City, generating a tidal wave of controversy. This program follows the Khalil Gibran International Academy's turbulent beginnings; the political firestorm that culminated in the resignation of Debbie Almontaser, the academy's founding principal; and Almontaser's legal battle to get her job back. The compelling narrative combines news clips, interviews with key players in the controversy, and graphic novel-style drawings for added visual interest-shedding light on important First Amendment concepts as well as the "Stop the Madrassa" campaign that accused the school of harboring Islamist influences.
Online
2010; 2009
8.

Time for School Part 3 [electronic resource]: Hope and Despair in the Fight for an Education

The 2009 installment in Wide Angle's Time for School series reenters the lives of seven students in seven different countries, offering a glimpse of the worldwide battle to get what most American children take for granted: a basic education. These riveting case studies in India, Afghanistan, Kenya, Benin, Brazil, Japan, and Romania feature young teenagers embracing academic challenges that will, with luck and hard work, prepare them for high school. Other hurdles, from school closings to slum crackdowns to violent fundamentalism, continue to disrupt hopes and dreams-forcing one child to repeat a grade, another to study on an empty stomach, and another to quit her education altogether. But a conversation with Benin-born musician and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Angelique Kidjo provides [...]
Online
2010; 2009
9.

The Business of Education [electronic resource]

Branding, quality control, overseas expansion-these concepts are no longer limited to the business world. Schools, colleges, and universities are under increasing pressure to operate like international companies, adopting corporate business models and intensely pursuing "customers" in the global marketplace. Filmed in the United Kingdom, China, India, and Malaysia, this program examines the rapidly developing education "industry" in both the West and the developing world. Instructors and administrators from well-established British schools like Newcastle University and Dulwich College explain why they are opening large, state-of-the-art campuses in Asia, while young scholars and borderless education experts help viewers understand why "exchange student" is an evolving concept.
Online
2010
10.

College, Inc [electronic resource]

This edition of Frontline takes a closer look at the booming business of higher education. It's a
Online
2010
11.

Lessons From the Real World [electronic resource]: Social Issues and Student Involvement

A follow up to Democracy Left Behind: NCLB and Civic Education (item 39484), this program looks at community-based learning in K-12 education. The film explores a wide variety of educational settings in which action-oriented lessons enable students to work outside the classroom, in their own communities. While taking nothing away from the importance of traditional academic subjects, the film promotes the idea that math, reading, and other areas are more effectively explored if students care about what they are learning-rather than being drilled with subject matter divorced from their real lives and the environments that often impact those lives.
Online
2011
12.

Expect the Best [electronic resource]

To have a shot at college, students must first believe they can get into college. This program shows the positive things that can happen when the dream of a college education is nurtured in classrooms and communities where expectations previously had been low. By spotlighting innovative approaches for motivating and teaching children - from the Upward Bound initiative in Cleveland that can only serve a few students, to GEAR UP's creation of a college-going culture in a Latino community in Texas, to the efforts of Project GRAD in Atlanta to get all 8th-graders ready to succeed in high school and then in college - the video documents both the rewards of expecting the best and the challenges communities face to ensure that their schools serve all students.
Online
2004
13.

Eye Openers Are Mind Openers [electronic resource]: Attention Exercises for the Classroom

Stress and distractions are major obstacles to learning at any class level. For the elementary classroom, specialized exercises called Eye Openers have been shown to dramatically improve focus and awareness among students. This program follows Dr. Martha Eddy-a widely respected educational consultant, founder of the Center for Kinesthetic Education, and the creator of Eye Openers-as she puts her movement and body coordination strategies into action. Working with a lively group of children in a real-world classroom setting, Dr. Eddy introduces simple yet effective exercises that cover relaxation, eye-hand coordination, eye-body coordination, attention warm-up, posture, peripheral vision, filtering out distractions, shifting focus between near and far, and more. The video contains sect [...]
Online
2011
14.

Reborn [electronic resource]: New Orleans Schools

Despite its horrific destruction, Hurricane Katrina gave New Orleans educators the opportunity to reinvent a school system that wasn't working. This program chronicles the first official year of public school in New Orleans after the storm and the transition to the widespread use of charter schools in the city. Focusing on predominantly African-American schools, the film examines the situation from the perspective of several different teachers and principals-while also illustrating the hopes and frustrations of students and their families as new schools are constructed and new teaching methods are put into action. Interviews feature KIPP Schools cofounder Mike Feinberg and many other education experts.
Online
2009; 2008
15.

Who's in, Who's Out [electronic resource]

Contrary to popular belief, adequate preparation for college-level study is not an option for the majority of America's public-school students. This program exposes the educational "sorting machine," the factors that mold a child's academic future, through the case of a set of twins from Nevada: one, an academically oriented high achiever who is encouraged to take honors classes, and the other, a musically inclined student who, turned off by the demands of school, is allowed to simply slide by with low-level coursework. It also illustrates how smaller, more intimate learning environments are increasing opportunities for high school students in New York City and greater Cincinnati who were falling through the cracks.
Online
2004
16.

Expect the Best [electronic resource]

To have a shot at college, students must first believe they can get into college. This program shows the positive things that can happen when the dream of a college education is nurtured in classrooms and communities where expectations previously had been low. By spotlighting innovative approaches for motivating and teaching children-from the Upward Bound initiative in Cleveland that can only serve a few students, to GEAR UP's creation of a college-going culture in a Latino community in Texas, to the efforts of Project GRAD in Atlanta to get all 8th-graders ready to succeed in high school and then in college-the video documents both the rewards of expecting the best and the challenges communities face to ensure that their schools serve all students.
Online
2004
17.

Get in, Stay in [electronic resource]

Issues of race and class have turned the college experience into an obstacle course that is deterring many of America's brightest students from graduating with a four-year degree. This video counters cultures of low expectation and social isolation with three stand-out initiatives that are helping students get into college-and stay in. Featured in this video are: the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, a national model for talented minority students studying science, engineering, math, and computer science; The Puente Project; the East Los Angeles College program, which bridges the transition gap between two- and four-year institutions; and the Twenty-first Century Scholars Program, which is raising educational aspirations among Indiana's low- and moderate-income families.
Online
2004
18.

The Hobart Shakespeareans [electronic resource]: A Case Study in Exceptional Teaching

"There are no shortcuts," says the banner at the front of Rafe Esquith's fifth-grade classroom. Most of Esquith's students come from low-income Mexican and Korean households in the neighborhood surrounding Hobart Boulevard Elementary, in Central Los Angeles - and his warning about shortcuts applies not just to young learners but to lazy teachers who can't see a future for marginalized children. Esquith is so committed to his mission that he transforms his class into a yearlong adventure - empowering the kids to perform Hamlet and undergo countless other out-of-the-box experiences while still excelling on standardized tests. Filmed over several months among the Hobart Shakespeareans, as Esquith's pupils have come to be known, this documentary explores their learning process and Esquit [...]
Online
2005
19.

Carolyn Jackson [electronic resource]: Lads and Ladettes in School

This program explores the rise of "lad culture" and "ladettes"-females who adopt stereotypical male behavior such as being loud and drinking heavily-in U.K. schools. What's driving the trend? What are its effects, and how can teachers can deal with it most effectively? Psychologist Carolyn Jackson talks about the origins, methodologies, findings, and implications for teachers of her work on this phenomenon.
Online
2009; 2013
20.

The Empty Desk [electronic resource]: Identifying and Assisting the at-Risk Student

For many young people, the school environment is a place of learning, creating friendships, forging an identity, and searching for a direction in life. However, there are some students who have difficulty actively engaging in the learning process due to low ability, an unsafe or unsupportive family life, or other factors, and therefore run the risk of not completing their education. This program focuses on how educators can identify at-risk students, examines the causes of disengagement, and provides strategies that can be used in the classroom to build a strong teacher-student relationship.
Online
2010; 2013