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1.

The Road to War [electronic resource]: American Decision-Making During the Gulf Crisis

This unprecedented historical retrospective provides an inside look at how the U.S. responded to the Gulf crisis, how America's leaders evaluated data and options, how decisions were made and policies implemented, and how the crisis was managed on a day-to-day basis-in short, the steps that led to war and thence to the cease-fire. The participants include James Baker, Dick Cheney, Colin Powell, and most of the other members of President Bush's "war cabinet" as well as the sub-cabinet officials who played central roles in the political, diplomatic, and military aspects of the war. We know of no comparable instance in which so many top-level officials have come together to discuss openly an event of such historic proportions. What this program presents is the firsthand recollections, v [...]
Online
1992
2.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Gambling With Your Money

You'd think after such a calamitous economic fall, there'd be a strong consensus on reinforcing the protections that keep us out of harm's way. But in some powerful corners, the opposite is happening. Business and political forces, including hordes of lobbyists, are working to diminish these protections. One of the biggest targets is the Volcker Rule, which aims to keep banks from using customers' deposits to gamble on their own, sometimes risky, investments. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill Moyers talks with Paul Volcker, the namesake of the Volcker Rule. Moyers' second guest is activist and former British diplomat Carne Ross, who shares nine principles for effective citizen action and describes his work to devise a banking system aligned with the public good. The broadcast [...]
Online
2012
3.

What Poor Child Is This? [electronic resource]: Poverty and America's Children

If poverty is a serpent, child poverty is its venom. And with an estimated 12 million American children suffering from economic hardship, even the wealthiest society on Earth cannot escape the poisonous effects of poverty. This program examines child poverty in the U.S.: its causes, its agents, and its human impact. Citing facts and findings that contradict the American ethos of upward mobility, the film lays bare the sad reality of what financial deprivation is doing to the nation's young people: eroding family bonds, decreasing literacy, increasing health and addiction risks, raising the specter of mental illness, and putting children disturbingly close to criminal influences. Lack of school readiness (preparation for kindergarten) and poor academic achievement are also examined as [...]
Online
2011
4.

Nouveau Poor [electronic resource]: Immigrant Poverty

The "golden door" exalted at the Statue of Liberty still beckons the world's poor. Once inside the U.S., however, most immigrants accept a lifestyle that is anything but glittering. This program reveals the conditions in which an American newcomer, legal or not, struggles to earn a living, save money, and meet basic needs. Featuring interviews with numerous immigrants from Latin America and Africa, the film illustrates their experiences with entrenched racism, unfairly low wages, the lack of a social safety net, few if any economic resources, and crowded, substandard housing. These individuals also describe the goals that drive them-education and a better future for their loved ones-and the equally important work ethic with which the majority of immigrants approach their jobs. Severa [...]
Online
2011
5.

Meet the Frackers [electronic resource]: Energy Independence or Environmental Nightmare?

Spreading out beneath the suburbs of Dallas, the underground deposit known as the Barnett Shale promises vast oil and gas riches. This program follows the efforts of Texas developers as they stampede for a piece of the action, even as local residents and environmental activists raise major objections. To liberate the bounty below calls for fracking-a controversial process in which huge quantities of water and chemicals are injected underground, shattering rock and releasing gas and oil. The film also examines other states where fracking is taking place, such as North Dakota, where farmer Jacki Schilke insists that frackers "are here to rape this land." Viewers are given a wide-ranging look at the pros and cons of what is touted as a major step toward America's independence from forei [...]
Online
2012
6.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Nuns, Faith, and Politics

Weeks before Paul Ryan was selected to run for vice president, Sister Simone Campbell - who heads NETWORK, a Catholic social justice lobby - hit the road to protest the so-called "Ryan budget" recently passed by the House of Representatives. She and some of her sister nuns rolled across the heartland on a bus trip designed to arouse public concern over what the Ryan plan would mean for social services in America, especially its slashing of programs for the poor. Sister Simone says that Ryan's budget is inconsistent with Catholic teachings, and although the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops agrees, other Catholics say the NETWORK nuns have crossed the line. Robert Royal, editor in chief of The Catholic Thing and founder of the Faith & Reason Institute, believes that issues of econom [...]
Online
2012
7.

Down in the Old Belt [electronic resource]: Voices From the Tobacco South

The tobacco farmers of the Old Belt of Virginia represent a history and a way of life that began with the founding of Jamestown and the colony of Virginia on the Chesapeake Bay. But tobacco farmers in Southside Virginia, like coal miners in Appalachia, have come upon hard times. Declining quotas, production moving overseas, society's changing attitudes, and the 2004 tobacco buyout have radically altered the cultural landscape of the Old Belt, the birthplace of Bright Leaf tobacco. This program traces the history and culture of tobacco in Virginia, providing a basis for studying past and ongoing socioeconomic changes, from the era of slavery to the present. Combining extensive archival materials with interviews and oral histories conducted with several Old Belt tobacco farming familie [...]
Online
2005
8.

The Need for Speed [electronic resource]: Drug Pushing by the U.S. Military

Americans have come to accept that the accidental killing of innocent civilians, and soldiers because of friendly fire, is just one of the sad realities of war. But what if we were told that those ill-fated casualties were the direct result of relentless military drug pushing? In this damning investigation, award-winning journalist Jamie Doran explores the allegation that U.S. air crews are being fed amphetamine pills "like candy." The Pentagon introduces its infamous "go pills" as a "mild stimulant," but ex-airmen tell a different story: they're mind-bending and dangerously addictive. A commercial airline pilot caught under the influence of speed would be forbidden to fly, possibly even dismissed. So why is the Pentagon allowing this shocking practice to continue in the military?
Online
2012
9.

Who Plays God? [electronic resource]: Medicine, Money, and Ethics in American Health Care

This program explores a variety of life-and-death situations to illustrate the spectrum of highly controversial ethical decisions made on a daily basis in modern American medicine. Hosted by ABC News medical correspondent George Strait, and featuring noted authorities such as health-care economist Uwe Reinhardt, the program takes an in-depth look at the decisions that underlie the use of health-care dollars. When is life support provided and stopped? Who gets the transplants, the best technology and treatments? Who lives longer and who does not? The program features five segments that portray choices concerning prolonged life support, the painful struggle of extremely premature babies, the allocation of organ transplants, the crises that accompany the inaccessibility of health insura [...]
Online
1996
10.

Overdose [electronic resource]: The Financial Collapse

The storm that would rock the world began brewing in the U.S. when Congress pushed the idea of home ownership for all, aiding those who couldn't make down payments. The market even coined a term: NINA loans (no income, no assets - no problem). When the world's financial bubble burst, the solution was to lower interest rates and pump trillions of dollars into the sick banking system. According to economics Nobel laureate Vernon Smith, "The solution is the problem. That's why we had a problem in the first place." Governments introduced the biggest financial stimulus packages in history. But what crazed logic is this, propping up debt with more debt? This documentary brings a fresh voice to the hottest topic of today.
Online
2010
11.

River Ways [electronic resource]: A Dispute Over Fish in Idaho

What do you do when the fish disappear? That's the question haunting Idaho. It's become the center of a bitter debate. The solution - removing four dams on the Snake River - is as controversial as the problem. It could be the only way to save the fish, but it also has dire consequences for the 50,000 people who depend on the dams for their livelihood. On one side are the commercial fishermen who want the dams removed. On the other side the farmers say removing the dams will be the end of them. As this documentary points out, the solution will be a disaster for one side or the other.
Online
2011
12.

Unconstitutional [electronic resource]: Examining the Patriot Act

Locked up indefinitely? No lawyer? No trial? If you think this can't happen to an American citizen, think again. Since 9/11 and the adoption of the Patriot Act, America has faced a fearsome erosion of civil liberties. This big-budget documentary reveals how paranoia, fear, and ethnic profiling have led to the subjugation of America's constitutional rights. Made for a theatrical release by Hollywood director Robert Greenwald, Unconstitutional exposes how the Patriot Act, meant to defend America, is actually leaving the country more vulnerable to future terrorist attacks. Officials acknowledge that the policies heralded by the act are isolating and antagonizing the very communities the nation needs to engage.
Online
2004
13.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Banking on Greed

Just when you think the reputation of banks couldn't get any worse, comes word that we ain't seen nothing yet. As many as 20 banking institutions, including Barclays Bank, Deutsche Bank, Citigroup, and JPMorgan Chase, are reportedly under investigation for engaging in illegal and unethical practices to protect their profits at all costs - and let others pay for their mistakes. On this episode of Moyers & Company, financial expert Sheila Bair talks with Bill Moyers about the lawlessness of our banking system and the prognosis for meaningful reform. Bair was appointed in 2006 by President Bush to chair the FDIC. During the 2008 meltdown, she argued that in some cases banks should be sold off to healthier competitors instead of receiving bailouts. Now a senior adviser to the Pew Charita [...]
Online
2012
14.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: America's "Sacrifice Zones

There are forgotten corners of this country where Americans are trapped in endless cycles of poverty, powerlessness, and despair as a direct result of capitalistic greed. Journalist Chris Hedges calls these places "sacrifice zones," and joins Bill Moyers in this episode of Moyers & Company to explore how areas like Camden, New Jersey; Immokalee, Florida; and parts of West Virginia suffer while the corporations that plundered them thrive. "These are areas that have been destroyed for quarterly profit," Hedges tells Bill. "It's a willingness on the part of people who seek personal enrichment to destroy other human beings…. And because the mechanisms of governance can no longer control them, there is nothing now within the formal mechanisms of power to stop them from creating essentiall [...]
Online
2012
15.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: The One-Percent Court

Because of partisan gridlock in D.C., the Supreme Court has become the most powerful and outspoken branch of government; decisions they make shape our democracy's fate for generations to come. Now, one has only to look at Bush v. Gore, Citizens United, and the Affordable Care Act rulings to understand why some call it a "one-percent Court" - dedicated by majority rule to preserving the power and influence of a minority of wealthy special interests. In this edition of Moyers & Company, The Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel and Jamie Raskin, constitutional law professor and Maryland state senator, join Bill to discuss how the uncontested power of the Supreme Court is changing our elections, our country, and our lives. Also on the show, Bill talks with Craig Unger, author of Boss Rove [...]
Online
2012
16.

Scientists Under Attack [electronic resource]: When Corporate Interests Control Research

According to some estimates, 95 percent of scientists conducting research in the field of genetic engineering are funded by agribusiness or related industries. What happens when researchers decide to work independently, steering clear of corporate influences? What are the consequences when scientific findings go against the interests of deep-pocket donors? This film profiles scientists who, based on rigorous investigation, have criticized the use of genetic modification and have been ostracized-some might say punished-for their conclusions. Viewers learn about the work of Dr. Ignacio Chapela, a Mexican biologist who faced a dubious public relations campaign against him and his Nature article on genetically modified maize, as well as the case of Dr. Arpad Pusztai, a Hungarian-born bio [...]
Online
2009
17.

A Walled America [electronic resource]

The next terrorist attack will come from right here, predicts American Border Patrol founder Glenn Spencer, gesturing at the U.S.-Mexican border. With its official-sounding name, unmanned satellite planes, and heat-seeking imaging systems, ABP seems like a government body, but by its own admission many of this citizen militia's actions embarrass the government. Using voices from both sides of the illegal immigration debate, this documentary examines the prevalence of vigilante groups that patrol the U.S. border and looks at the rising power of anti-immigration lobbyists.
Online
2007
18.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Suppressing the Vote

The fight against voter fraud is a solution in search of a problem - these days, documented instances of voter fraud are virtually nonexistent. Nonetheless, since the 2010 midterm elections, ten states have passed laws requiring government-issued photo IDs to vote, identification that for many is too expensive or otherwise difficult to obtain. In this edition of Moyers & Company, Bill Moyers talks to Keesha Gaskins and Michael Waldman of the Brennan Center for Justice about new voter ID and other election laws that keep the young, elderly, minorities, and the poor from exercising one of the most fundamental American rights. "When these votes come under attack by this level of partisan gamesmanship, it's completely inappropriate and antithetical to our history," Gaskins tells Moyers. [...]
Online
2012
19.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: What We Can Learn From Lincoln

One reason so many are disillusioned by the state of things in America - even more so after the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre - is that our political system hasn't produced consistently good results in a long time. This edition of Moyers & Company points to a new ray of hope - not in politics, but in theaters: the movie Lincoln. Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the film's screenplay, joins Bill to discuss what Abraham Lincoln can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy. Also on the show, Bill urges us to remember the victims of the terror in Newtown by name, rejects the notion of doubling down on guns and body armor as a response, and encourages all of us to work hard on realistic and moral solutions. Broadcast dates: [...]
Online
2012
20.

Moyers & Company [electronic resource]: Why Jobs Come First

Our obsession with slashing the deficit is getting in the way of real work that needs to be done to preserve both our economy and our democracy. It's all about jobs, says Paul Krugman, who joins Bill Moyers in this edition of Moyers & Company. The Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist explains why our top priority should be getting America back to work - if only Congress and the president would stop throwing distractions in the way. Later in the show, Bill explains how the recent fiscal cliff deal gave tens of billions in tax breaks to Wall Street and corporations - what even The Wall Street Journal calls a "crony capitalist blowout.
Online
2013