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1.

A Human Life Emerges [electronic resource]

Human reproduction is a fascinating and complex process, especially when seen microscopically. This program presents a close-up view of reproduction, beginning with the fertilization of the female egg, through gestation and the millions of cell divisions, and culminating in the birth of a fully formed individual. Each stage of the development is visualized in sequence: when the heart begins to beat, when the limbs develop, when the child first moves and responds to stimuli, and when it offers its first cry to the world at the moment of birth. Sophisticated computer animation and technical narration are used throughout in an effort to explain the gestation and birth processes for the advanced learner.
Online
2006; 1995
2.

Hand-Me-Down Genes [electronic resource]: How Genes Work

Our body is composed of billions of cells, but how does each cell know what to become? This program starts with the nucleus of a single cell and then explains the other components the cell needs to function: chromosomes, genes, DNA, and ribosomes. From hair color to height, our genes determine who we are. This program explores, through animated graphics, all of the basic genetic building blocks and how they work.
Online
2006; 1997
3.

Hand-Me-Down Genes [electronic resource]: Family Patterns

When you look at a family photo, the resemblances, even across several generations, can be striking. What role do genes play, and why aren't siblings identical (and why are some)? This program explains how the formation of sex cells, from the first gamete to chromosome pairs, determines our genetic makeup. Deviations such as cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease, achondroplasia, Klinefelter syndrome, and Turner syndrome are also discussed.
Online
2006; 1997
4.

Genetic Engineering Pt. 1 [electronic resource]: How DNA Works

Any discussion of genetic engineering first requires a knowledge of how organisms replicate. In this program, Dr. David Cove describes the structure and function of DNA as he covers how coding sequences and promoters work together to create proteins from amino acids. DNA's remarkable suitability as a medium for duplicating the blueprints of life both rapidly and accurately in a simple yet precise language is emphasized.
Online
2006; 2001
5.

Genetic Engineering Pt. 2 [electronic resource]: How Genes Are Engineered

How does cDNA differ from normal DNA? Can a bullet really implant genes? And why is a gene for bioluminescence so valuable to researchers? This program answers those and other questions as it introduces the process of genetic engineering. Dr. David Cove deftly explains how reverse transcriptase is used to isolate genes, how isolated genes are cloned, how cloned genes are delivered via benign virus or "DNA gun," and how the effects of delivered genes are tracked by reporter genes.
Online
2006; 2001
6.

Genetic Engineering Pt. 3 [electronic resource]: Applications and Issues

Many scientists and consumers believe that genetic engineering will vastly improve life on Earth, while others believe it will spell the ruin of the planet. What are the facts behind the rhetoric and the hysteria? In this program, Dr. David Cove surveys past and probable future applications of genetic engineering while calmly presenting possible benefits and liabilities. The case is stated for genetically modified crops; microorganism-produced human insulin; engineered vaccines, which involve no disease-causing microbes; and the diagnosis and cure of gene-based diseases. The concept of risk assessment is also defined.
Online
2006; 2001
7.

Diagnosing and Treating Cystic Fibrosis [electronic resource]

Divided into four segments, this program examines the presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and biochemistry of cystic fibrosis. Topics explored include chronic health problems associated with CF, the analysis of mutated genes through DNA sampling, the combined use of medication and physiotherapy to reduce damage, and the vital role of transmembrane regulators in passing chloride ions and water across cell membranes in the lungs. Computer graphics and endoscopic imagery enhance this informative educational resource.
Online
2007; 1998
8.

One Brief Life [electronic resource]: Baby L Case

During her eight weeks of life, Leaney Lavea-born prematurely and with medically insurmountable abnormalities-was dependent on machines to live. But were these machines prolonging her life, or were they merely delaying her death? This deeply moving program explores the ethical dilemma surrounding a case that began in a hospital and ended up in court. Interviews with Baby L's parents, the attending physician, the Laveas' legal counsel, and others trace the course of the battle between the parents and the hospital to assert their rights to do what they each believed was morally correct.
Online
2005; 1998
9.

DNA Profiling [electronic resource]

What used to take two weeks currently takes only a day-and in the near future, will likely take mere minutes. In this concise program, Chris Hadkiss, senior scientist at the Forensic Science Service, explains the latest DNA extraction and quantification techniques. Detailed laboratory footage illustrates the processes of sample extraction, quantification, amplification, separation, and interpretation. In addition, Mr. Hadkiss provides background on the history of DNA profiling, sources of DNA for sampling, the difficulties associated with radioactive tagging as compared to fluorescent tagging, and the value of mitochondrial DNA analysis.
Online
2005; 1998
10.

Birth Defects [electronic resource]: Causes and Prevention

This program explores the most common types of birth defects, covering the major classifications: malformations present at birth, inborn errors of metabolism, blood disorders, and prenatal damage. The video also includes information on the prevention of birth defects, with an emphasis placed on the importance of good prenatal care.
Online
2005; 1990
11.

After Darwin [electronic resource]: Genetics, Eugenics, and the Human Genome

From the promise of eliminating genetic disease to the threat of eradicating human diversity, the potential of genetics to benefit humankind is matched only by its capacity for harm. Using interviews, archival footage, and period film clips, this insightful program traces the history of genomic research and its dark offspring: behavioral genetics, eugenics, and the commodification of children. Spotlighting topics including the Human Genome Project, gene patenting, cloning, fertility clinics, genetic testing, and the discriminatory practices of insurance companies, Nobel Laureate Dr. James Watson, Dr. Leroy Hood, and numerous other experts examine the potential of the biotechnological revolution and the moral and ethical issues it raises.
Online
2005; 1999
12.

Genetic Discoveries, Disorders, and Mutations [electronic resource]

This program analyzes the contributions of Mendel and Darwin, the transmission of single- and multiple-gene disorders, and genetic mutation. Following a description of Mendel's landmark pea-breeding experiments, the principles of heredity are applied to the spread of congenital conditions such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, myotonic dystrophy, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The second half of the program centers on types of mutation, including point mutation, deletion, frame shifting, insertion, and gross chromosomal abnormality. Darwin's theory of natural selection is considered as well.
Online
2006; 1997
13.

High-Tech Foods [electronic resource]: Is Genetically Engineered Food Safe?

Fast-tracked by the FDA, GMOs-genetically modified organisms-have already deeply penetrated America's food supply. Are they safe? In this program, NewsHour correspondent Paul Solman looks at both sides of the GMO controversy. Agricultural law professor Neil Hamilton, a nutrition consultant, and an independent corn farmer counsel a conservative approach, while economist Dermot Hayes, of Iowa State University, reacts to the unfairness of anti-GMO rhetoric, in which the plants are, in effect, considered guilty until proved innocent. Do the potential benefits of GMOs outweigh the possible risks?
Online
2006; 2000
14.

Overview of Biotechnology [electronic resource]

Some of the hottest challenges facing the 21st century are being worked on right now by biotechnologists. This introductory-level program investigates the dynamic field of biotechnology and examines how it relates to a cross-section of different disciplines such as medicine, healthcare, ergonomics, and communications. In addition, employees from the biotechnology sector offer their insights on the work that they do and on the industry as a whole.
Online
2006; 2000
15.

Hormone Hell [electronic resource]

Whether it is due to a specific time of life or a particular style of living, hormones are believed to alter moods and erode bodily health. In this program, endocrinologist Lorraine Fitzpatrick, of the Mayo Clinic; a woman who has kept a video diary charting her monthly bouts with PMS; and a cast of teens and seniors investigate how hormones affect different stages of life, such as puberty and menopause. In addition, psychiatrist Ned Kalin, of the University of Wisconsin; a police officer; and a trans-Atlantic flight attendant offer insights into the hormonal havoc caused by stress and jet lag.
Online
2006; 1999
16.

Hormonally Yours [electronic resource]

From the womb to old age, it is believed that hormones have a powerful impact on gender and sexuality. Drawing on the research of Roger Gorski, professor of neurobiology at UCLA, and Donatella Marazzitti, of Pisa University, this program explores both the role of sex hormones and the biochemistry of love. Case studies of transgendering and a condition in which a woman's body produces an excess of testosterone are examined. In addition, a group of teenagers-considered "hormones on legs" by Dr. Gorski-share their approaches and reactions to the impulse of sexual attraction.
Online
2006; 1999
17.

Hormone Heaven? [electronic resource]

A world without teenage angst, PMS, and mid-life crisis; a life without hair loss and wrinkles: are these products of wishful thinking, or genuine scientific possibilities? In this program, scientists from the University of Wisconsin and the Life Extension Institute in Palm Springs strive to answer that question through their intriguing research. Clinical studies into hormone supplements for youthful vigor and hormone replacement therapy for healthier bones are described by medical professionals as well as by enthusiastic patients themselves. Research correlating cortisol production with stress is included.
Online
2006; 1999
18.

Genetically Modified Crops [electronic resource]: Hope vs. Hype

This ABC News program begins with an overview of the controversial new type of crop hybridization known as genetic modification, exploring why the technology has panicked European consumers and has left many American farmers with mixed feelings. Then, correspondent John Donvan moderates a vigorous discussion between Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman; Val Giddings, Vice President of Food and Agriculture at the Biotechnology Industry Organization; and vociferous anti-biotechnology activist Jeremy Rifkin, who debate the value of government and industry testing and the need for package labeling.
Online
2009; 1999
19.

Accepting Life's Transitions [electronic resource]

Aging is a series of transitions, some gradual and some abrupt. How do people come to terms with these changes? This program examines the aging process from beginning to end, defining age from the viewpoints of biology, psychology, society, functionality, and the law. The impact of current behaviors and attitudes on one's future self is also discussed, as well as dying-itself a part of life-and the stages of grieving. In addition, the program addresses the health challenges faced by older Americans and indicates why some seniors cope better than others.
Online
2006; 1998
20.

Infants [electronic resource]: Fight for Life

When a baby is hospitalized with a life-or-death illness, parents place their trust in the doctors, nurses, and other specialists of the neonatal intensive care unit. This program blends the intimate and the informative to examine both the technological and the human aspects of infant critical care. Case studies featuring footage of the birth of the Faul twins, one of whom was diagnosed in utero with a potentially life-threatening cyst; Baby Eddie's surgery and therapy, designed to allow his undeveloped lungs to grow; and Baby Prakhar's treatment for a mystifying virus are included.
Online
2005; 2000