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1.

Coat of Many Countries

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The clothes we wear today are the remarkable coming together of goods and services from all over the world. By following the evolution of a suit, we glimpse the practical application of the new global economy.
DVD
2000; 1999
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Coat of Many Countries

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The clothes we wear today are the remarkable coming together of goods and services from all over the world. By following the evolution of a suit, we glimpse the practical application of the new global economy.
VHS
1999
Ivy (By Request)
3.

The Transforming Industrial Heartland [electronic resource]

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Program 5.1 documents the change in the economy of Liverpool from containerized shipping technology which reduced the labor force, to a seaport city that is the center of information and services for the region. Program 5.2 focuses on Randstad, Netherlands, as an example of a small, crowded Netherlands region striving to maintain its transportation connections while preserving dwindling green space.
Online
2003
4.

Challenges in the Hinterland [electronic resource]

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Program 6.1 documents Spanish Andalucia's struggles to move beyond tourism and agriculture to integrate with Europe's heartland. Program 6.2 is a case study of modern Iceland and its attempt to balance sustainable fish harvests with the social costs of not joining the European Economic Community.
Online
2003
5.

Voices of the Poor [electronic resource]

In the shadow of an increasingly interconnected and globalized economy, many of the world's poor are worse off than ever before. This classic documentary travels to Tanzania, Mali, India, Brazil, and Bosnia to present some practical solutions offered by poor people themselves as they face the challenge of improving their living conditions. Slum residents who have formed community activist groups explain why having sewage systems and permanent housing will improve their ability to get jobs, and microloan recipients discuss their hopes of financing their children's education. "There are the poor, and there are the miserable," says an elderly woman in Brazil. "We are the poor, but we are fighting to rise ...
Online
2001
6.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Pavan Sukhdev - Put a Value on Nature!

Every day, we use materials from the Earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value? Would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste? Think of Pavan Sukhdev as nature's banker, assessing the value of the Earth's assets. In this TEDTalk, he shares some eye-opening charts that will make you think differently about the cost of air, water, trees... A banker by training, Sukhdev shows that green economies are an effective engine for creating jobs and creating wealth.
Online
2011
7.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Nirmalya Kumar - India's Invisible Innovation

Can India become a global hub for innovation? Nirmalya Kumar thinks it already has. In this TEDTalk, he details four types of "invisible innovation" currently coming out of India and explains why companies that used to just outsource manufacturing jobs are starting to move top management positions overseas, too. Kumar is a professor of marketing at the London Business School and a passionate voice for new entrepreneurs in India.
Online
2012
8.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Robert Neuwirth - the Power of the Informal Economy

To research his book Stealth of Nations, Robert Neuwirth spent four years among the chaotic stalls of street markets talking to pushcart hawkers and gray marketers in order to study the remarkable "System D," the world's unlicensed economic network. In this TEDTalk, Neuwirth shares what he learned. Responsible for some 1.8 billion jobs, "System D" is an economy of underappreciated power and scope.
Online
2012
9.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Pankaj Ghemawat - Actually, the World Isn't Flat

It may seem that we're living in a borderless world where ideas, goods, and people flow freely from nation to nation. We're not even close, says globalization researcher Pankaj Ghemawat in this TEDTalk. With great data (and an eye-opening survey), he argues that there's a delta between perception and reality in a world that's maybe not so hyperconnected after all.
Online
2012
10.

Greece's New Odyssey [electronic resource]

For decades Greek islanders have migrated to the mainland in search of economic opportunity. But now, due to long-term unemployment and increasingly constrictive austerity measures, many of these city-dwelling professionals are moving back to their home villages, bringing with them ideas that they hope will solve not just their own financial problems but their country's as well. This program introduces some of the men and women in the vanguard of Greece's inspiring entrepreneurial trend. Viewers meet students at an agricultural school in Thessaloniki, where middle-aged urban transplants are beginning to outnumber young, local enrollees; a couple raising snails for the international gourmet market; and others who are using barter and alternative currency along with a pioneering spirit [...]
Online
2012
11.

Made in Germany [electronic resource]: Europe's Economic Superstar

It's almost miraculous: a few scant decades ago, what is now the world's fourth-largest economy was brutally split in two. Today, all of Europe looks to Germany for answers. This documentary examines the nation's economic, social, and cultural power-how it developed at the dawn of the 21st century and how it will continue to shape the EU and the world. Factors for viewers to consider include a national focus on work and industry that values family businesses, solid professional training, and lifetime employment within the same company; environmental policies that emphasize sustainable, efficient energy sources such as solar and wind, enabling even small towns and villages to profit; and an ongoing faith in economic pillars such as Volkswagen, whose Glass Factory in Dresden serves as [...]
Online
2012
12.

Sicily [electronic resource]: Traditional Flavoured Pecorino Cheeses

As the largest island in the Mediterranean, the culture of Sicily has been influenced by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs and Normans - and of course the Italians. These influences can clearly be seen in the traditional cheese-making process. Host Will Studd travels to Sicily and visits one of the last farmhouse dairies making a saffron-flavored sheep's milk cheese. He also samples the many flavors of Sicilian Pecorino, and explores a Dickensian cheese-maturing room that is several centuries behind the times.
Online
2010
13.

Spain [electronic resource]: The Catalonian Cheese Revolution

The past two decades have seen an extraordinary revolution in Spanish cuisine, mostly from Catalan chefs. The region has also led a renaissance in artisan cheese making which virtually disappeared in the Franco era. Will Studd visits the beautiful city of Barcelona where he meets author Eric Canut. The hills outside the city hold the secret to the revival of Catalan cheeses; from the traditional Mato and Tupi, to the newcomer Garrotxa. Next, several chefs demonstrate ways to use the local cheeses in traditional Catalonian dishes. Then it's off to Manorca, the island of cheese, to see how the traditional Mahon cheese is produced.
Online
2012
14.

Southeast France [electronic resource]: Traditional Cheeses of Provence

Will Studd travels to Provence in the South East of France and discovers Banon, a traditional benchmark goat's milk cheese wrapped in dried chestnut leaves, and a rare cheese called Brousse du Rove. He then drives from Provence to the Vercors plateau, where he leans about St Marcellin and an extraordinary, small dried goat cheese whose name literally means ' the feet of god'.
Online
2010
15.

Switzerland [electronic resource]: Mountain Cheese

Switzerland is famous for producing the finest mountain cheeses in the world, and three quarters of these are still made with raw milk. Host Will Studd samples Raclette and learns how it's made over a wood fire. Then he's off to the picturesque town of Gruyere to trace the origins of a cheese whose name literally means 'head monk'. A meeting with the king of Swiss cheese, Emmanthaler, finally answers the age old question; how does it get those holes?
Online
2006
16.

Tasmania [electronic resource]: The New Cheese Pioneers

In this episode, host Will Studd again teams up wit renowned Australian chef Tetsuya Wakuda for a tour of Tasmania, and to demonstrate a few of his unusual recipe ideas with the local dairy and produce. On their travels, the pair meets with some artisan cheese makers who have proudly put the country back on the map. Some of the recipes include Bruny Island cheese and wood-fired oysters, artisan cider produced from heritage apples, handmade cultured butter from Elgaar Farm, John Bignell's blue cheese and leatherwood honey, King Island cream and lobster, and even a Wasabi flavored cheese.
Online
2010
17.

The Champion of English Cheese [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd visits influential cheese retailer Neal's Yard Dairy in London, where cheese champion Randolph Hodgson explains how traditional English farmhouse cheese was saved from extinction. Will then looks at how these cheeses are made when he travels to the Midlands, Lancashire, Cheshire and Wensleydale, made famous by Wallace and Gromitt. Finally, he looks at the controversial raw milk blue cheese call Stichelton, and how its success may change the way Stilton is mode.
Online
2009
18.

Turkey [electronic resource]: The Traditional Cheeses of Turkey

The Republic of Turkey is the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and one the legacies of its history of invasion is a variety of regional cheeses that are rarely found outside the country. Will Studd visits the ancient spice markets of Istanbul, Canakkal to learn about this country's most popular marinated cheeses Azine Peynir, and a hard cheese called Mahalic. In the Anatolia region of the country he visits a small dairy near Kars where he gets a lesson in making the rare blue string cheese, and finds Tulum, the traditional cheese aged in animal skins.
Online
2012
19.

Twins of the Mediterranean [electronic resource]: Corsica and Sardinia

Despite their close proximity to each other, Mediterranean Islands Corsica and Sardinia have distinctly different cheese traditions. Corsica is renowned for its soft sheep's milk cheese, Brocciu, but there is also Sartinese which is made with either sheep's or goat's milk, but then is left to age so that maggots can "whip" the texture. A short ferry ride to Sardinia and Will discovers the ancient curd cheese matured in a goat's stomach. Finally there is the authentic Sardinian Pecorino Sardo, hand made by shepherds and then smoked over an open fire.
Online
2009
20.

Wales [electronic resource]: Artisan Cheese Champions

Caerphilly may be the most famous traditional cheese of Wales, but it's not the only one. Host Will Studd travels to the island to visit Caws dairy and meets the family responsible for re-creating farmhouse Caerphilly. Then he catches up with an old friend at Gorwydd farm who is now making this benchmark cheese from raw cow's milk. Finally, Will discovers how two cheese-makers are responsible for putting Wales back on Britain's specialist cheese map.
Online
2010