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1.

Fate of the Earth [electronic resource]

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Explores the delicate balance of the Earth's ecology and humankind's capacity for the destruction of life. Looks at the natural forces that created the universe from the ocean's depths to the distant boundaries of the solar system. Features interviews with scientists, biologists, and ecologists who study the biology of life and discuss the newfound concern for the preservation of the planet. Examines the environmental and human impact on the Earth's ecology, including the greenhouse effect, pollution, dwindling rain forests, and the possibility of nuclear warfare.
Online
1986
2.

How Climate Made History: Episode 1

Ever since the Big Bang, powerful forces have forged the conditions on Earth that have made life here possible. In a single breath-taking sequence, we travel through the millennia to witness the formation of our planet, its singular position in relation to the sun, the evolution of our continents and the birth of entire mountain chains. We learn how all of these elements combine to create Earth’s constantly changing climate. Homo sapiens emerge into this unpredictable and violent world, fighting for survival from the start. It is these early humans’ ability to adapt that allows them to triumph even in the face of incredible adversity. The path for modern man is set at this early stage.
Online
2017; 2015
3.

The Birth of the Solar System

Craig Kochel, Geology Department, Bucknell University, describes the evolution of our solar system and its planets. Included in this conversation are the origins of the Moon, the creative dynamism of plate tectonics, and the impact of geology on Earth’s biology.
Online
2015; 2011
4.

The Anthropocene: A New Age of Humans—Catalyst

Human impacts on the way our planet functions have now become so extreme that many scientists are claiming the Earth has shifted out of the Holocene state and into a new geological epoch. They’re calling it "The Anthropocene", the new age of humans, because millions of years after we are gone, the scar of our existence will be visible in the rocks of tomorrow. In this program, we look at how the last 60 years of socio economic growth has transformed the human race into a geological force to rival nature.
Online
2017; 2016
5.

How Climate Made History: Episode 2

Is it possible that climate change could have kick-started the end of Antiquity? When temperatures drop and the climate becomes drier, the Huns swarm Europe. It’s the last straw and brings about a mass migration that shakes the foundations of the Roman Empire. They abandon cities like London – the ghost-towns of Antiquity. Could this have been enough to herald the beginning of the ‘Dark Ages’ that follow? Historic sources from Byzantium right across to China have a different suggestion, now backed up by new scientific insights: around 536 AD, the Ilopango Volcano in Central America erupts. The eruption is violent and propels ashes right up into the Stratosphere. The result: the sun dims to a blueish hue that struggles to break through the ash-layer. The following 10 years are extraor [...]
Online
2017; 2015
6.

The Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland: The Long Recessional

This is the most glaciated part of the Alps, containing Europe's largest glacier and a range of classic glacial features such as U-shaped valleys, cirques, horn peaks and moraines. It provides an outstanding geological record of the uplift and compression that formed the High Alps. The diversity of flora and wildlife is represented in a range of Alpine and sub-Alpine habitats and plant colonization in the wake of retreating glaciers provides an outstanding example of plant succession. The impressive vista of the North Wall of the High Alps, centerd on the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau peaks, has played an important role in European art and literature.
Online
2017; 2003
7.

The Murray-Darling Basin: A System in Crisis (Part 1)

This program examines the complex interaction between nature and human activity in the Murray-Darling Basin from early settlement to the present. Focussing on water as a resource, it explores: Geographic characteristics of the region, forms of agriculture and importance of region's food production. Distribution of water resources, challenges faced by early farmers and other settlers. Historical development of water management policies. Development of water storage and irrigation methods, and the Snowy Mountains Scheme emergence of environmental problems.
Online
2017; 2009
8.

Earth: The Inside Story

Earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and extreme weather. Has Earth always been this way? Featuring footage of top geologic hot spots on every continent, the film traces the scientifically-based story of the 4.5 billion-year-old Earth, from the core to the crust and up into the atmosphere.
Online
2017; 2015
9.

The Murray-Darling Basin: A System in Crisis (Part 2)

In program one we looked at how the natural features of the Murray-Darling Basin have shaped farming and water management practices, and how in turn those practices have changed the rivers and the land. In this second part of the series, we look at how over-allocation of water resources, climate change, salinity and other problems are threatening the long-term productivity and sustainability of the region.
Online
2017; 2009
10.

Life's Rocky Start

Four and a half billion years ago, how did life emerge on Earth? Robert Hazen advances a startling idea-that the rocks on Earth were not only essential to jump-starting life, but then, as microbes flourished and took over the biosphere, life helped give birth to hundreds of minerals we rely upon today. NOVA reveals how the story of life on Earth is fundamentally interwoven with the epic, unfolding story of Earth itself.
Online
2018; 2016
11.

The Himalaya Connection

The collision zone of the massive Indian and Asian tectonic plates is one of the most seismically active places on Earth. These plates trace an arc beneath the Himalaya Mountains and run south below the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, an area that is inhibited by billions of people. This program follows earth scientists working in seven countries who are urgently investigating this high-risk zone.
Online
2018; 2017
12.
H2O

H2O

Water is the miracle molecule, and mankind has used its perfect properties to revolutionize our lives. It was our first superhighway, the lifeblood of civilization, and gives us 90% of all the power we use today.
Online
2018; 2013
13.

Restless Earth

Wait a sec. Earth is hot on the inside? The continents move? And some German guy named Alfred Wegener noticed that Africa and South America fit together like puzzle pieces? That sounds like a magma-filled layer cake of mystery. Care to dig in? Topics include: Earth's Interior Layers, Plate Tectonics, and Evidence of Plate Tectonics.
Online
2018; 2013
14.

NOVA: Killer Volcanoes

NOVA's expert team looks for the signature of a volcanic eruption big enough to have blasted a huge cloud of ash and sulfuric acid into the atmosphere. Killer Volcanoes spotlights the search for the mystery volcano that plunged the globe into a deep freeze and inflicted famine on medieval Europe.
Online
2018; 2017
15.

Gold Fever

This episode asks why mankind is gold crazy, and discovers there's a hard-wired reason we lust after it, and a microscopic explanation for why it shines. We reveal how the science behind our favorite metal drives men across oceans and continents.
Online
2018; 2013
16.

Journey to the Earth's Core

Humans have mapped every corner of the globe-from jungles and deserts to the depths of space. Yet we have gone only seven miles below the Earth's surface.
Online
2018; 2011