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81.

Bill T. Jones [electronic resource]: Still/Here

What is it like to live with a life-threatening illness? Can fear, anger, and joy be translated into movement? In this program, journalist Bill Moyers and filmmaker David Grubin give viewers a rare glimpse into dancer/choreographer Bill T. Jones's highly acclaimed dance, "Still/Here. At workshops around the country, people facing life-threatening illnesses are asked to remember the highs and lows of their lives, and even imagine their own deaths. They then transform their feelings into expressive movement, which Jones incorporates into the dance performed later in the program. Jones demonstrates for Moyers the movements of his own life story-his first encounter with white people, confusion over his sexuality, his partner Arnie Zane's untimely death from AIDS, and Jones's own HIV stat [...]
Online
2006; 1997
82.

Humans and Bacteria [electronic resource]

This program presents the human body as a complex ecosystem of bacteria, then examines each portion of the body, which bacteria live there, and why. The three major bacterial groups-sphere-shaped cocci, rods, and helical spirochetes and spirilla-are examined. Their behavior when interacting within the body is explored. The life and death of obligate aerobes, facultative anaerobes, and obligate anaerobes is described. A discussion of factors that encourage bacterial growth leads to specific information on which bacteria cause certain conditions, and how infection can be avoided.
Online
2005; 1994
83.

AIDS [electronic resource]: Global Crisis

This program offers an excellent worldview of AIDS, providing background on the disease's history, its transmission and symptoms, innovative awareness campaigns, and the ongoing search by scientists from around the globe to find an effective long-term treatment. Fred Valentine, director of the Center for AIDS Research at the New York University School of Medicine; Lawrence Altman, medical correspondent for The New York Times; Andrew McMichael, principal investigator for the Oxford AIDS Vaccine Initiative; and others share their insights into a pandemic that has already infected and killed tens of millions.
Online
2005; 2002
84.

Classifying Commensals and Pathogens [electronic resource]

This program provides a clinical overview of benign bacteria that commonly colonize the human body and, less commonly, pathogens of both infectious and transient asymptomatic strains. Two dramatized throat examinations demonstrate the diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes and infectious mononucleosis. Laboratory analysis of a throat culture and a blood sample is demonstrated. Slide images, diagrams, and lists of microorganisms are also incorporated into the video.
Online
2005; 2000
85.

Body Wars [electronic resource]: Disease and the Hygiene Hypothesis

Despite the highest sanitary and medical standards, diseases once extremely rare in developed nations are now on the rise. Has ultra-hygienic living unwittingly made us the enemies of our oldest allies? This program examines compelling evidence for the "hygiene hypothesis," which suggests that indiscriminate war on all microscopic organisms may be bad for our health. Immunologists, epidemiologists, microbiologists, gastroenterologists, and environmental health experts comment on dramatic increases in allergies, auto-immune diseases, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Case studies of asthma, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and eczema illustrate radically new approaches to treatments.
Online
2006; 2001
86.

Emerging Diseases [electronic resource]

An outbreak of mad cow disease shut down Britain's cattle industry, resulting in the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of animals and costing the nation billions of dollars. What is mad cow disease, scientifically known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy? Could an outbreak happen in the U.S.? What other types of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are out there? What precautions is the USDA taking to reduce the likelihood of occurrence and stem the spread of these degenerative neurological diseases among animals and people? And what might happen if those precautions fail? This program answers those and other questions as it sheds light on this emerging group of food-borne diseases. Chronic wasting disease, Norwalk virus, and bovine tuberculosis are also addressed. Correlates [...]
Online
2005; 2004
87.

Microbe Invasion [electronic resource]: Learning From Good Guys and Bad Guys

This engaging program delves into the microscopic milieu that overlays life as human beings know it, illustrating the complex relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic worlds as the human host, with its billions of microbial allies and antagonists, journeys from the birth canal to the decomposition that follows death. Spectacular 3-D computer animation, case study footage, and expert commentary offer insights into the infiltration mechanisms of a range of pathogenic organisms; defense strategies of the digestive tract, lungs, ears, nose, and skin; positive results of probiotic therapy; and postmortem forensic research.
Online
2005; 2002
88.

Infection [electronic resource]: History

As a history of infection and contagion, this program tells a story of clever science and dumb luck, horror and hope. Filmed at locations worldwide, the video traces the battles fought against humanity's oldest foes: diseases such as yellow fever, malaria, syphilis, cholera, smallpox, tuberculosis, polio, and perhaps the deadliest pandemic of all, AIDS. Health workers and epidemiologists on the front lines discuss the dynamics of combating disease, particularly in Africa, where AIDS ravages the continent. The growing problem of antibiotic resistance is also examined. Experts include Dr. David Ho, a virologist at the Pasteur Institute in Paris who has developed some of the most effective HIV drugs.
Online
2005; 2001
89.

The New Face of Leprosy [electronic resource]: Healing Bodies, Opening Minds

Multidrug therapy can cure leprosy, stop its transmission, and prevent disfigurement. However, the disease will not be eradicated until early diagnosis and easy access to treatment become the norm-and heightened awareness completely replaces fear with facts. This compassionate program uses case studies from India, Ethiopia, Brazil, and Japan to illustrate the symptoms of leprosy, pharmaceutical treatment, and corrective surgery. In addition, it movingly addresses the rejection, isolation, and violation of human rights that generally have been the lot of leprosy patients. Initiatives such as Father Marian Zelazek's Karunalaya Leprosy Care Center are spotlighted.
Online
2006; 2001
90.

Health News and Interviews [electronic resource]: Diseases and Disorders Video Clips

This collection of 54 video clips (1 minute to 2 minutes 30 seconds each) takes a close look at infectious diseases and medical disorders, spotlighting AIDS, ALS, Alzheimer's disease, aneurysms, asthma, autism, avian flu, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, food allergies, heart attack, Huntington's disease, macular degeneration, malaria, Marburg virus, muscular dystrophy, Parkinson's disease, Spanish influenza, spinal cord injury, stroke, and West Nile virus. Video clips include: Infectious Diseases * Marburg Virus Treatment * AIDS-Immune * How Viruses Infect * Disease Travel * Flu-Blocker * Flu Shot * Making Killer Flu * Flu Jail Cells * Bird Flu Clues * Killer Flu Re-created * MD on a Chip * Cell Scouts * Malaria Milestone * West Nile Airplanes * West Nile Shot; Medical Disorders * Allergi [...]
Online
2008; 2007
91.

Moderate Exercise, Anxiety, Salt and Fat, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *Moderate Exercise-It's What We're Told We Need to Do, but What Is It Exactly? Moderate exercise: many of us are confused about what "moderate" actually means. Casey Beros heads to the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne to find out from an international expert in this field just what is considered moderate exercise, and how much of it we need to do. *Anxiety-One of the Most Common Yet Poorly Recognized Psychological Problems, Affecting Many of Us: The first in a gripping three-part series on anxiety. Anxiety is one of the most common yet least well-recognized psyc [...]
Online
2011
92.

Teeth Whitening, Body Mass Index, Bee Stings, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *Part 2 of Our Anxiety Investigation-How It Affects Childhood and What's Being Done about It: Previously on Tonic, we started a three-part series on anxiety-an incredibly common psychological problem that often goes unrecognized and untreated. This week we look at the time in life when anxiety tends to begin, yet often goes detected-in childhood. We meet a young boy who suffers from anxiety and find out about the treatment that has helped him and his family deal with the condition. *Teeth-Whitening Products-Safe or Scary? There's no end to the things some of us will do to make our [...]
Online
2011
93.

Pharmacogenomics, Too Clean Kids, Chronic Illnesses, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *Part 3 on Anxiety-How Anxiety Affects Adolescents: Adolescence can be a tough time for anyone, but those dealing with an anxiety disorder can have a particularly hard time, especially when their condition goes unrecognized or untreated. When young people start to mature, general worries become more prominent. Focusing on their studies, separating from parents, and becoming more social are all extremely important factors, and with hormonal, physiological, and psychological changes taking place, it's hard to know what's considered normal behavior and what could be an anxiety disord [...]
Online
2011
94.

Low Vitamin D Risks, Clinical Trials, Lower Back Pain, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *The Harm Caused by Low Vitamin D Levels: We hear lots of talk about problems with low vitamin D levels, from increased risk of cancer to multiple sclerosis and more-and now research from the U.S. adds another: an increased risk of stroke. Dr. Norman Swan interviews an expert from Johns Hopkins University about the issue. *Using Virtual Reality to Change our Perception of Our Bodies: The same realistic technologies employed for modern video games can be applied to a health care setting, and virtual reality can be used to alter our perception of the way we see ourselves. Casey Bero [...]
Online
2011
95.

Bone Density and the Prostate, Women's Heart Health, Immunization, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *The Link in Men between Bones and Prostate Gland: Prostate cancer is extremely common-in fact, most men will develop the condition if they live long enough. They won't necessarily die from it, as it's usually slow-growing and often comes to nothing. However, the holy grail for men would be a way of detecting the truly aggressive prostate cancer that requires treatment-and that's exactly what researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore are exploring. They've found, in following men as they age, that those with particularly strong or dense bones may be at increased risk of [...]
Online
2011
96.

Caring for the Mentally Ill, Selenium Supplements, Fears and Phobias, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *The Impact on Children of Growing Up with a Parent Who Suffers from Mental Illness: A staggering one in two of us will have a mental illness at some point in our lives. For most people that means anxiety or depression, but a significant proportion will have severe mental illness. Many of those people have children, so how does their condition affect the mental health of their offspring? We meet an incredible man who grew up with a schizophrenic parent; we find out how it affected him and learn about the amazing program he's created to help kids in the same position. Then, we meet [...]
Online
2011
97.

Body Perception, Heart Diseases Risks, Diagnosing Alzheimer's, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *Using Virtual Reality to Change Our Body Perception: Bioprinting: amazing technology that uses printers in ways you'd never imagine! Science fiction is becoming reality with the development of a machine that might one day make human spare parts. This is cutting-edge technology that will blow your mind-and if your mind does get blown, don't worry: we can make you a new one, or any other organ. Casey Beros has the story. *Cholesterol as a Risk Factor for Heart Disease-Is It All It's Cracked Up to Be?
Online
2011
98.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Sexual Health, Internet Self-Diagnosis, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Affects Up to One in Six Women-Yet When Many See Their Doctor, They Don't Get the Right Diagnosis or Help: Up to one in six women suffer from a condition that can profoundly affect their lives, yet many of them don't know what's wrong with them. When they see their doctor, they don't get the right diagnosis or help. Dr. Norman Swan sits down with an internationally recognized expert in polycystic ovary syndrome to find out why women get it, what they can do about it, and what the new guidelines say in terms of treating it. *The Benefits and Risks of Dati [...]
Online
2011
99.

Dizziness, Exercise and Depression, Power of Positive Thinking, and More [electronic resource]

In Tonic, Dr. Norman Swan leads a team of reporters who cover all aspects of health, from lifestyle to complementary medicines to the most recent medical discoveries. Topics covered in this episode include: *What Is Dizziness, and How Do You Know When It Becomes a Sign That Something Is Wrong? Everyone feels dizzy from time to time. Some of us even get dizzy for fun, but it's no fun when you have no control over it and it hits you out of the blue. It's a horrible feeling as the blood rushes to your head or away from it-the world spins and you lose your balance. So what is dizziness, and how do you know when it's a sign that something could be wrong? Casey Beros catches up with Professor Michael Halmagyi of the University of Sydney. *The Best Exercise for Keeping Your Mood Up: One of [...]
Online
2011
100.

No Ordinary Lives [electronic resource]: Living With Cystic Fibrosis

This very special episode of Tonic-the final episode for series 1-features a remarkable story of courage, resilience, and achievement by young people. Thirteen years ago, a film was made about the experience of teenagers living with a disabling, life-shortening condition called cystic fibrosis. In those days, it was common for children and young people to die from this disease which damages the lungs and causes problems with digestion, resulting in malnutrition. Since then, the story has changed and people with the inherited condition live much longer lives. We catch up with the original interviewees to see what's become of them as adults, and we follow two young people living with the condition today.
Online
2011