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41.

Infectious Diseases [electronic resource]: More Mobility, Greater Danger

Illustrating connections between globalization and the spread of disease, this program uses data-mapping to assess the potential impact of deadly viruses-including the much-feared and adaptable avian influenza. Outbreaks of bird flu in the Netherlands and West Nile virus in New York City illustrate the increasing mobility of exotic pathogens in an era of frequent international travel and dynamic global migration. Presenting detailed information on virus tracking and the horrific effects that many epidemics have on livestock as well as on people, this video illuminates a new front line in the battle between humans and their microscopic enemies.
Online
2006; 2004
42.

Genital Herpes [electronic resource]

The shock and stigma that often follow a genital herpes diagnosis are difficult to overcome. This program deals with the physical side of the disease-explaining how it is contracted, how it manifests itself, and how it can be treated-as well as its social and emotional impact. Interviews with distinguished medical professionals shed light on specific developments in the fight against genital herpes, including the advent of powerful antiviral drugs, the special needs of pregnant women, and the relationship between herpes and HIV. Additional commentary from a psychologist who counsels herpes sufferers reinforces one patient's insistence that "there is life after herpes.
Online
2006; 2001
43.

Pediatric AIDS [electronic resource]

Both promising and controversial, the drug Nevirapine is a strategic weapon in the battle against pediatric AIDS. This program explores the positive effects of medicines such as Nevirapine and AZT-and of obstetric procedures developed in recent years-that have helped prevent in utero HIV. It also assesses progress that doctors and counselors have made in helping youths who are already infected with the virus. Interviews with children, parents, and healthcare professionals highlight the importance of emotional support for young patients and describe the use of sophisticated drug cocktails that will hopefully keep kids alive until a cure is found.
Online
2006; 2002
44.

Influenza [electronic resource]

If influenza were an animal, it would be a chameleon. This program sheds light on the constantly changing virus, exploring medical efforts to track its adaptations, improve flu treatments, and develop a reliable vaccine. Explaining the differences between influenza types A, B, and C, the video describes how the body's immune system reacts to an influenza attack, highlights the importance of T-cell levels, and looks at the particular vulnerability of people over age 65. Detailed commentary from physicians, researchers, and CDC authorities focuses on the historical cycle of epidemics and global pandemics and the push to develop an H5N1 avian influenza vaccine.
Online
2006; 2005
45.

The Age of Viruses [electronic resource]

In an escalating war between humans and microbes, catastrophic disease may have the edge. This program studies the ubiquitous threat posed by super viruses and describes scientific efforts to prepare for viral disease epidemics. Documenting the World Health Organization's response to the 2005 Angolan Marburg virus outbreak, the program examines strengths and weaknesses in the WHO infrastructure. It also visits the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Montana, and Cornell University's CHESS Synchrotron X-ray facility, featuring interviews with leading researchers who are developing sophisticated weapons against Ebola, dengue, HIV, and other viruses.
Online
2006; 2005
46.

Fighting the Microbes [electronic resource]: History of Antibiotics

The prescription of antibiotics is a medical tightrope-walk. The drugs save lives, but, because of overuse, may soon usher in a new era of super-germs. This program outlines the discoveries of bacteria and penicillin and sheds light on the frightening emergence of multi-resistant, often deadly microbes during the last six decades. Presenting interviews with researchers who are deeply involved with the issue-including Tufts University microbiology professor Stuart Levy and Eva Nathanson of the World Health Organization's Stop TB Program-the film examines the implications of antibiotic-enhanced livestock feed and the dangers that staphylococcus poses to hospital patients. Contains footage of injections, surgeries, and open wounds.
Online
2007; 2006
47.

AIDS Warriors [electronic resource]: Confronting Africa's Health Crisis

In sub-Saharan Africa, AIDS is not only a vast humanitarian tragedy, but also a dire threat to regional stability. This Wide Angle documentary explores the role of Angola's military, the only functioning arm of the state, in a nationwide effort to combat the AIDS pandemic. The program identifies what may be the only benefit of Angola's long civil war-specifically, one of the lowest HIV infection rates in southern Africa-although this advantage is now endangered as refugees and soldiers reenter civilian life. Uncompromising in its social and political analysis, this program offers an arresting portrait of a nation and continent ill-equipped to defend against an exploding health crisis. In addition, Stephen Lewis discusses Africa's AIDS crisis with anchor Mishal Husain.
Online
2006; 2004
48.

H5N1 [electronic resource]: Killer Flu

Avian influenza A (H5N1) has successfully made the leap from poultry to people. Is a human-to-human pandemic inevitable? Using Southeast Asia as a case study, this Wide Angle report looks at the Vietnamese government's efforts to contain the disease while educating its population. In addition, Bill Moyers speaks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, of the National Institutes of Health, about how this lethal virus mutates and spreads, symptoms of infection, best- and worst-case survival scenarios, the vaccination development process, and whether there will be enough vaccine in the event of a major outbreak.
Online
2006; 2005
49.

Helping the Youngest Victims of AIDS [electronic resource]: Spotlight on South Africa

This ABC News program focuses on the good works being done by two remarkable AIDS crusaders who have taken the AIDS pandemic in Africa to heart: singer/songwriter Alicia Keyes and human rights maverick Stephen Lewis. Keyes' position as spokesperson for Keep a Child Alive, a nonprofit organization providing life-saving medicines directly to African children and families with HIV/AIDS, is showcased alongside the efforts of Lewis, U.N. Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa and creator of a foundation devoted to funding community-based HIV/AIDS-related initiatives.
Online
2006
50.

Out of Control [electronic resource]: AIDS in Black America

With the final investigative work of journalist Peter Jennings as its cornerstone, this program studies the frightening rise of AIDS among African-Americans-a trend that has been developing for several years, but which has gone largely unnoticed outside the black community. Jennings' contribution to the program is a candid group discussion he conducted with HIV-positive African-American men in Atlanta. In addition to that eye-opening conversation, the program also features talks between anchor Terry Moran and various black leaders-including the Reverends Jesse Jackson, Calvin Butts, and T. D. Jakes-and frank input from several African-American women.
Online
2007; 2006
51.

Circulation [electronic resource]: What an Autopsy Reveals

The life of a cardiac patient might hang by a thread-but it's more accurate to say it hangs by a tube. In this program, anatomist Gunther von Hagens and pathologist John Lee demonstrate just how delicate and vulnerable the human circulatory system is. Exposing the network of veins and arteries from a deceased woman's body, they dissect the heart to reveal a massive affliction of arterial sclerosis and illustrate what dead heart muscle looks like. They also drain the system of blood and pump a UV-sensitive resin through it, showing how blockages can affect circulation, harm the function of vital organs, and lead to heart attacks and death.
Online
2007; 2006
52.

Tumor [electronic resource]: What an Autopsy Reveals

Cancer is a vicious killer, but it leaves behind substantial clues that doctors can study. In this program, anatomist Gunther von Hagens and pathologist John Lee expose cancer for what it is-an attacker that can quickly and stealthily infiltrate the human body. Lee and von Hagens dissect the cadaver of a woman who, tragically, lost a battle with bowel cancer; they reveal the site of the primary tumor in the sigmoid colon, as well as the areas to which cancer had metastasized: the lungs and abdominal wall. To further illustrate tumor-spreading, the frozen body of a woman who succumbed to breast cancer is encased in polyurethane foam and sawed into slices.
Online
2006
53.

Poisoning [electronic resource]: What an Autopsy Reveals

In this program, anatomist Gunther von Hagens conducts a meticulous autopsy in order to address the subject of poisoning-but the toxins he searches for have been manufactured within the deceased. Von Hagens and pathologist John Lee dissect the body of a man who suffered kidney failure, showing how the body can be contaminated if critical organs such as the kidneys and the liver can't filter out the poisonous by-products of metabolism. Following explanations of dialysis, a long segment of intestine is removed and connected to a fluid source, demonstrating the frequently fatal effects of obstruction, ulceration, or perforation of the intestinal tract.
Online
2007; 2006
54.

Shameless [electronic resource]: Art of Disability

What does it mean to be disabled and how does it shape an artist's work? This documentary explores what is known as the disability art movement, following five artists-including a painter, a writer, an actor, a theater director, and a filmmaker, all of whom happen to have physical disabilities-through their creative work. Intense group discussions of artistic and personal goals are also recorded. Dispelling the myth of tragic disability, the film depicts its subjects as, first and foremost, creative people. The result is a profound look at, and celebration of, the act of making art-viewed through the lens of disability and the rejection of its stereotypes.
Online
2007; 2006
55.

Understanding Hepatitis a [electronic resource]

Although it's the least menacing type of hepatitis, the virus strain known as HAV should not be underestimated. This program focuses on the causes and typical treatments for Hepatitis A and guides viewers through the different levels of danger that the virus poses to victims. Medical experts-including Dr. Harold Margolis, Former Chief of the CDC Hepatitis Branch, Dr. Jay Keystone of the University of Toronto, and travel medicine specialist Dr. Bradley Connor-explain the basic science behind HAV infections, describe common symptoms, and spell out preventive and palliative strategies. Also, a traveling businessman describes his frustrating experiences with Hepatitis A.
Online
2007
56.

Understanding Hepatitis B [electronic resource]

More harmful and resilient than its alphabetic precursor, Hepatitis B is usually transmitted sexually or through other close bodily contact. This program explains what distinguishes HBV from other hepatitis strains, how it can infect the human body and still go undetected for decades, and how it can be prevented with vaccines. Physicians specializing in hepatitis research and care-including Dr. Robert Perrillo of the Ochsner Clinic Foundation, Dr. Anna Lock of the University of Michigan Medical Center, and Dr. Frank Mahoney, chief of the CDC's Hepatitis Prevention Unit-outline both successful and tragic case studies and guide viewers through the public health benefits of HBV education and immunization programs.
Online
2007
57.

Understanding Hepatitis C [electronic resource]

Most people associate cirrhosis with alcoholism-but another cause of liver scarring and failure is HCV, one of the most severe strains of hepatitis. This program provides a basic medical understanding of the virus, presents various ways that it is transmitted, and explores what many call a groundbreaking method of Hepatitis C treatment. Veteran researchers and doctors-Professor Eugene Shiff of the University of Miami Center of Liver Disease, Dr. Ira Jacobson of Weill Cornell Medical College, Dr. Beth P. Bell of the CDC, and others-describe typical HCV danger zones and causes and the pronounced risk of liver damage that the virus represents. Advanced antiviral therapies combining interferon and ribavirin are also discussed.
Online
2007
58.

HIV & Me [electronic resource]: Fear, Ignorance, and Education

Among new HIV cases, heterosexual patients are the majority-and high-risk behavior appears to be on the rise in many young demographic groups. What does this tell us about evolving attitudes towards AIDS? How do factors such as immigration, cultural tradition, economic disparity, and government inaction come into play? Writer and actor Stephen Fry pushes for answers, infusing this program with equal parts curiosity and outrage. Fry surveys carefree London clubbers about condom use and, traversing the U.K., examines the perception of HIV/AIDS among gays and straights alike. After meeting a British woman infected by her Ghanaian partner, Fry journeys to South Africa to confront that nation's obfuscating AIDS policies. Contains mature themes and occasional explicit language and imagery.
Online
2009; 2007
59.

HIV & Me [electronic resource]: Medical Advances and Setbacks

Science has made leaps and bounds in its assault on AIDS-but do antiretroviral drugs guarantee a long life? Why does the disease still cause widespread suffering in Africa, despite the development of new medicines? Author and actor Stephen Fry investigates, traveling across the U.S., Great Britain, and Uganda as he studies the medical obstacles to an AIDS-free world. Fry highlights good news, such as reasonable longevity among many patients and the fact that healthy babies are born to infected mothers. He also laments the impact of late HIV diagnoses, the plight of patients who don't respond to medicine, and AIDS tragedies observed in and around Kampala-where corruption and drug supply problems typify Africa's vulnerability. Contains mature themes and occasional explicit language and [...]
Online
2009; 2007
60.

Drug-Resistant Pneumonia [electronic resource]

When antibiotics first came on the scene, deaths from pneumonia plunged. But the microbes that cause the lung infection are resilient and continue to evolve, creating new strains that don't respond to conventional drugs. This program tours a high-tech medical lab where super-bacteria are identified, illuminates ongoing research into fighting drug-resistant MRSA, and explains why serious pneumonia cases can put doctors in a race against time. Expert guests include Dr. Marin Kollef of Washington University's School of Medicine, Dr. John Gill Bartlett of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Dr. Michael S. Niederman of Winthrop University Hospital.
Online
2009; 2007