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Discrimination in Education — Law and Legislation — United States
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161.

Interview With Louis T. Rader October 25, 1987.

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Disc 239. Historian William H. Harbaugh describes the irony of John W. Davis defending the separate but equal doctrine in Brown v. the Board of Education and explains why Davis took the case as its appellate lawyer. Harbaugh also comments on Thurgood Marshall's opinion of Davis. At 9:20 interview with engineer and business professor Louis T. Rader begins. Mr. Rader talks about his life and career, as well as his support of public education in the promotion of a successful business climate. During Massive Resistance, he protested closing Virginia public schools using the argument that businesses don't want to operate in a community with poor schooling. Disc 240. Mr. Rader recalls his support of public schooling in Virginia during Massive Resistance in order to sustain economic develop [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
162.

Interview With George R. Ferguson October 25, 1985.

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Disc 240. Mr. Rader recalls his support of public schooling in Virginia during Massive Resistance in order to sustain economic development within the commonwealth. At 5:30, interview with George R. Ferguson begins. Mr. Ferguson recounts the lawsuit brought by the Charlottesville NAACP to desegregate schools immediately following the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954. Court proceedings continued into 1958, when the judge assigned several black children to attend otherwise white schools in Charlottesville. The commonwealth then closed schools in Charlottesville under the policy of Massive Resistance. Mr. Ferguson describes how the Boatwright committee of the Virginia General Assembly harassed Charlottesville NAACP members.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
163.

Interview With Oliver W. Hill and Samuel Wilbert Tucker October 26, 1985.

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Disc 246. Civil rights attorneys Oliver Hill and S.W. Tucker discuss the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, including the meaning of "with all deliberate speed." They remark upon how long it took to desegregate schools. They comment on the policies of Senator Harry Byrd and President Dwight Eisenhower. Mr. Hill talks about his service in the military during World War II. Mr. Tucker also served, and he relates stories about how Jim Crow worked in the military. Discs 247 to 250. Mr. Tucker and Mr. Hill recount stories of life under Jim Crow, including experiences with seating on trains and other forms of transportation, service at restaurants, taking the bar exam, race riots, and trying to reserve a bridal suite on a honeymoon. They also tell the story of Dr. Charles Drew. Disc [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
164.

North Philadelphia Locations October 25, 1985.

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Disc 264 and 265. Footage of North Philadelphia.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
165.

The Road to Brown: The Untold Story of "The Man Who Killed Jim Crow"

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The story of segregation and the brilliant legal campaign against it which helped to launch the Civil Rights movement. Also a moving and long- overdue tribute to a daring but little known Black lawyer, Charles Hamilton Houston - "the man who killed Jim Crow". Charles Houston, Dean of Howard University Law School, realized that an attack on the legal basis of segregated education would undermine Jim Crow. In a taut constitutional detective story, the video untangles the cases that led to the landmark 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision. Finally, the video revisits the "New South" of integrated schools and black elected officials. Though much has changed, America still has far to go along the road to equality and social justice.
VHS
1990
Law (Reserve Stacks) Map
166.

A Child Shall Lead Them: Two Days in September 1957

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Eleven African-American first-grade children initiated the desegregation of previously all-white elementary schools in Nashville, Tennessee, on Sept. 9 and 10, 1957. Nashville was one of the first cities in the South to act on the Supreme Court 1954 decision, Brown vs. The Board of Education. The film compares the Nashville story with events that took place the same week at Little Rock (Arkansas) High School. Three of those children, now grown, and their parents discuss the events of those days, including the bombing of the Hattie Cotton school, and the courage required to respond to the Court's landmark decision. The story is told through the use of first-person narratives, and archival photos and footage.--From publisher description.
Online
2008; 2007
167.

Supreme Court Decisions That Changed the Nation: Brown vs. Board of Education

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The unanimous overruling of Plessy v. Ferguson, declaring segregation in public schools unconstitutional.
Online
1986
168.

Interview With Alice Jackson Stuart December 7, 1987.

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Disc 259. Alice Jackson Stuart recounts her experiences as the first African American student to apply to the University of Virginia. When Donald Gaines Murray applied to University of Maryland School of Law, Ms. Stuart (who already had a bachelor's degree from Virginia Union University in 1933) spoke with family friend and Murray's lawyer Charles Hamilton Houston about helping to advance integration of higher education by provoking a legal case via her application to the University of Virginia graduate school of education. Disc 260. Ms. Stuart recalls different events that occurred during litigation of her case during 1935 and 1936. She explains that when the Virginia General Assembly passed a bill awarding scholarships and living expenses to minority students to attend out-of-state [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)