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1.

What's on Your Plate?

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"A ... documentary about kids and food politics. Over the course of one year, the film follows two eleven year old multiracial city kids as they explore their place in the food chain. Includes three study modules, connected to the 64-page curriculum guide, entitled School food, Health + access, and Local food."--Container.
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Food for Thought: Global and Local Strategies for Healthy Eating

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Michael P. Timko, Ph.D. (Professor, Department of Biology, University of Virginia) discussed food, diet, and nutrition as a lifestyle and addressed the controversial topics concerning genetic engineering of foods, the safe consumption of animals raised on genetically modifed feed and cloned animals, organic versus commercially grown foods, and functional foods and the science of nutrigenomics. Timothy Beatley, Ph.D. (Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities, Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, University of Virginia) entitled his talk, "The Power of Food: Towards a Sustainable Food System" and addressed the disconnect that Americans and the West have with who grows our food. Beatley also outlined and discussed the "Elements of a healthier, community food syste [...]
DVD
2008
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
3.

How the Body Ages [electronic resource]

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Asks how and why the body ages. Topics include skin cancer, wrinkles, body composition, loss of strength, height reduction, arthritis, and osteoporosis among others. Differentiates between normal aging processes and diseases associated with aging. Considers the relationship of environment and genetics on the aging process.
Online
1993
4.

Maximizing Physical Potential of Older Adults [electronic resource]

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Stresses the importance of diet and exercise in a realistic lifestyle for older people. Indicates sleep patterns changes are a normal part of the aging process but diseases such as diabetes are not. Early detection is seen as the single most important aspect in successful treatment of diseases of aging such as of late-onslaught diabetes, osteoporosis, and cataracts. Warns that older people and their caretakers should be aware of drug interactions, and safety risks and consider the use of assistive devices. Explains why older people are more prone to accidents and stresses the need to assess hazardous risks and provide assistive devices.
Online
1993
5.

All About Food Additives [electronic resource]

Most foods that are purchased for everyday consumption and which pass through some form of industrialized processing contain additives of one type or another. In a sense, humans have used food additives for thousands of years-the use of salt, spices, and other enhancements can be considered a basic foray into the art and science of food additives. This video explores a wide variety of food additive types, including colors, flavors, preservatives, emulsifiers, stabilizers, gelling agents, antioxidants, and processing aids, any or all of which might be found in a typical packaged grocery item. Supported by exciting visual images and graphics, a respected food scientist discusses the core concepts of additives, why we use them, and what kind of impact they have on nutrition.
Online
2012
6.

Sugar Overload [electronic resource]: Corporate Profits vs. Public Health

With the average American consuming about 22 teaspoons of sugar every day, it's no wonder obesity and other health problems are on the rise. But here's what's really frightening: eighty percent of the sugar we consume isn't in candy or desserts - it's hidden in foods like "healthy" breakfast cereals, yogurts, and microwave meals. This film shows how consumers are being misled about the quantity and form of sugar in their diets, and how the health effects of sugar are being downplayed as the sugar lobby continues to go on the offensive. According to some doctors, sugar is not just an empty calorie, it's a poison as dangerous as nicotine and a leading cause of a number of serious illnesses. As well as the epidemic in child obesity, sugar has been linked to diabetes, heart disease, hype [...]
Online
2012
7.

Stressed Monkeys Eat More [electronic resource]

Researchers in Atlanta studied a group of dominant monkeys and a group of subordinate monkeys to track their eating habits. The subordinate monkeys ate more of the food that was full of fats and sugars. Scientists say that food high in fat and sugar are comfort foods, and the monkeys under stress from their dominant counterparts were drawn to that food. This ABC News report looks at the correlation of this study to the eating habits of humans.
Online
2008
8.

The Men Who Made Us Fat: Part 2 [electronic resource]

Jacques Peretti investigates how the concept of "supersizing" changed our eating habits forever. How did a nation of moderate eaters start to want more? Perretti speaks with industry professionals to examine the story behind the introduction of value meals, king-size snacks, and multi-buy promotions. The program also explores developments in dietary advice and includes interviews with obesity experts.
Online
2012
9.

White House Campaign on Childhood Obesity [electronic resource]

Obesity has become increasingly common in the United States. Antonio Neves reports on the role of diet and exercise in developing a healthy lifestyle.
Online
2010
10.

Cheers to Your Health! [electronic resource]

Some ingredients in beer could have health benefits.
Online
2012
11.

Metabolic Syndrome [electronic resource]

Need a good reason to get out of your easy chair and into a healthier lifestyle? Then consider the possibility that a lack of physical activity, together with other common health problems, can make you a prime candidate for a potentially life-threatening health condition called metabolic syndrome. Learn what metabolic syndrome is, find out about its causes and consequences, and determine prevention measures.
Online
2005
12.

The Health Benefits of Plain Popcorn [electronic resource]

Movie theater staple packs in cancer-fighting antioxidants.
Online
2013
13.

Designing Menus for Healthy Diets [electronic resource]

Jesse's mother has to work late, so Jesse is responsible for cooking the family a healthy meal-but he has no idea which ingredients to choose or how long the preparation will take. This program follows Jesse as he learns how to plan a well-balanced menu that fits in with a busy lifestyle. The video discusses the functioning of nutrients and their role in wholesome meals; menu-planning and basic items to keep on hand; and the growing trend of relying on convenience foods in today's fast-paced society.
Online
2010; 2013
14.

Hidden Sodium [electronic resource]

The largest part of our sodium intake comes from the salt that is used in processed and restaurants foods. Since too much sodium is bad for our health, consumers need to read the labels on processed and restaurant food in order to make healthy decisions.
Online
2013
15.

The Omnivore [electronic resource]: Satisfying Humanity's Hunger

Hunger is one of the biological drives essential to the survival of the human species. Constantly in search of something to eat, humanity has invented societal structures and means of conservation in an effort to ensure an adequate supply of food. This program traces the history of humankind's efforts to satiate the need to feed, from hunting and gathering, to agriculture and animal husbandry, to barter and commerce. And going beyond simple subsistence, the use of eating as a social ritual and pastime of gourmands is also addressed.
Online
1997
16.

MyPlate [electronic resource]: Understanding the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans

When the USDA replaced MyPyramid with MyPlate, the goal was to simplify dietary recommendations by providing at-a-glance guidelines without having to weigh and measure at every meal. This program explores the key concepts of MyPlate and how it correlates to the more detailed Dietary Guidelines for Americans, including portion sizes, proportions, food group choices, and caloric balance. The video explains why it's a good idea to fill half your plate with produce, and even breaks down which vegetables edge out others in terms of fiber and nutrients. Stressing the impact of poor eating habits on health, it discusses fat and salt intake, high-fructose corn syrup and other sugars, and whole versus refined and enriched grains - and suggests seafood and other protein choices beyond just mea [...]
Online
2011
17.

No Accounting for Taste [electronic resource]: Why We Eat What We Eat

With help from a professional nutritionist and the wide-ranging opinions of everyday consumers, this program investigates the factors that determine which foods we love-and which foods we just can't stomach. Viewers learn about a variety of social, psychological, and biological influences. Specific topics include the concept of satiety-our bodies telling us whether we are hungry or full-as well as the impact of culture, religion, lifestyle, peer relationships, and the media. For aspiring culinary artists, restaurant managers, and institutional menu planners, this is a rewarding exploration of the positive and negative associations people develop with food over time.
Online
2011
18.

Menu Planning [electronic resource]: Toddlers, Pregnancy, and the Elderly

Whether the setting is a preschool, hospital, or retirement home, it's vital for those who plan meals and menus to understand the dietary requirements of particular age groups. This program explains the nutrients our bodies require for optimum health and how those requirements change throughout our lives. Overviewing the stages of the human life cycle, the video highlights the basic nutritional needs in each phase and encourages thoughtful, detailed meal planning for toddlers, expectant mothers, and seniors. Real-life examples and practical tips from experts are provided throughout the film.
Online
2011
19.

Born to Be Fat [electronic resource]

The case of a mouse born in 1994 with the molecular basis for obesity is the focus of this episode. Its discovery was the starting point for a revolution in the science of human weight loss. It was found that the mouse was missing a hormone called leptin, which turns off feelings of hunger. A similar absence has been found in obese humans. The detection of genes that determine the extent of control we have over our appetites has caused a revolution in the study of weight loss. It helps explain why some of us are fat and others are thin and is opening up the possibility of controlling the urge to overeat.
Online
1999
20.

Fixing Fat [electronic resource]

This episode examines the way in which the traditional weight-loss advice of dieting and exercising works for only five percent of the millions of us who are fighting flab. An operation that reduces the size of the stomach is a solution, but most overweight people would much prefer to take drugs to help them become thin. However, such medicines can cause dangerous - even fatal - side effects. Thus, a food of the future containing natural ingredients that can help us feel satiated and prevent us from overeating is being cooked up.
Online
1999