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1.

An Unhealthy Government Experiment [electronic resource]: Western Australia, 1897 to 1937

"Everyone appreciates the government's protection," wrote Gladys Gilligan in 1930 of the work camp where she and other biracial children were taken after being snatched from their homes. Her account was written at the behest of Aborigine Protector A. O. Neville and differs sharply from the heart-wrenching testimony provided by Stolen Generations survivors for this film. Gilligan rebelled against her role as "model Aborigine" but Neville kept a stranglehold on her life. Jandamurra was also caught between two worlds. Born on a cattle station, he went on to lead an insurrection against the ranchers. The First Australians' continued struggle, especially against the forced assimilation of the Stolen Generations, is recounted in this documentary. With Gilligan's son, Phillip Prosser; histo [...]
Online
2007
2.

Hijacking the Arab Spring? [electronic resource]: The Rise of the Islamists

For decades, the Muslim Brotherhood was an outlawed organization, marginalized and persecuted. Today, along with the Salafists and other Muslim groups, they are the principal winners of the Arab revolutions. They believe in a "Turkish model" of Islamic rule, and their speech is well-crafted to avoid scaring away the West. But what kind of policies do they want to introduce? Should political Islam be feared? Abdel Hakim Belhadj, leader of the Islamic al-Watan Party in Libya, has long been on the CIA's radar. In Morocco, radical preacher Sheikh Mohamad Fizazi is enjoying a comeback. And in Syria, insurgents are fighting to introduce Sharia Law. From Libya to Morocco to Syria, this program investigates the new parties jostling for power.
Online
2012
3.

My Land [electronic resource]: Seeing Both Sides of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Born to a Moroccan Muslim father and a Tunisian Jewish mother, filmmaker Nabil Ayouch spent his childhood hearing divergent views about Israel and Palestine. Still wrestling with "a conflict that never left me," Ayouch created this poignant documentary about young Israelis, displaced Palestinians, and the threads of tragic history woven between two communities with deep ties to the same land. Ayouch entered Lebanese refugee camps to record personal testimonies from elderly Palestinians about memories of their birthplaces. Then he visited those homes in present-day Israel to learn about the attitudes of the young people currently living there. This process of gathering perspectives enabled Ayouch to set up the film's evocative virtual encounters, in which the Israeli subjects view and [...]
Online
2011
4.

The "White Australia" Policy [electronic resource]: Constraining the Servile Races-Immigration Nation

When the Commonwealth of Australia was founded in 1901, the last thing the country wanted was to be multicultural. The measures taken to ensure an all-white nation not only caused human suffering, but actually helped create the very threat Australia feared the most - invasion from the Asian north. Through the plight of a Chinese family kept apart by immigration laws, this program examines the legal and social policies that once prohibited entry into Australia by people of color. The video covers Charles Pearson, whose book about the "servile races" frightened Prime Minister Barton into passing the Immigration Restriction Act; the influence of adventure novelist H. Rider Haggard; and President Wilson's dismissal of the Racial Equality plan proposed by Japan to the League of Nations, a [...]
Online
2010
5.

World War II [electronic resource]: Populate or Perish-Immigration Nation

Australia faced a population crisis after the second world war, in that experts believed the country could not defend itself or grow economically unless it boosted the number of people living there. With the pool of available Britons decreasing, Immigration Minister Arthur Caldwell made the momentous decision to permit non-British settlement. This program explains how Australia accepted an influx of a million newcomers in the middle of the 20th century while still clinging to its whites-only policy. Caldwell convinced wary citizens that the nation must "populate or perish" before the next Japanese attack, then recruited European war refugees, filling a ship with fit-looking men and buxom women who came to be known as the Beautiful Balts - a PR tactic calculated to assuage Australian [...]
Online
2010
6.

Cold War [electronic resource]: Australia Opens Its Doors

Despite being criticized overseas, Australia's exclusionary attitude toward people of color was still popular at home during the Cold War era, with the rise of communism further justifying the need to prevent Asians from entering the country. But change was in the air as civil rights movements gained momentum and a new generation questioned the ethos of the past. This program looks at the people and events responsible for dismantling Australia's whites-only immigration policy at the end of the 20th century. The unforeseen consequences of Robert Menzies' Colombo Plan, in which Asians would be allowed temporary residence in Australia; the staged kidnapping of a 6-year-old Fijian girl facing deportation; and Prime Minister Fraser's eventual acceptance of the thousands of Vietnamese refu [...]
Online
2010
7.

One Fine Day [electronic resource]: Individual Acts of Courage and Defiance

Idealists thrive on the notion that a single person can change the world-but what basis does it have in reality? Is there room for it in an age of oppression and unrepentant brutality? This film profiles six people from different cultures and religions who, through small nonviolent actions, helped to overcome injustice. Ashin Kovida, a Buddhist monk now living in the U.S., reflects on his leadership of anti-government protests in Myanmar, formerly Burma. Maria Jesus Sanhueza, a young Chilean woman, describes her role in the Penguin Revolution which brought about government funding for education. And Christian Fuhrer, former pastor of the St. Nicholas Church in Leipzig, Germany, recounts the Monday Demonstrations and "Prayers for Peace" that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Equally [...]
Online
2012
8.

Israel's Prisoner X [electronic resource]: A Special Edition of Foreign Correspondent

Up until 8:00 pm on February 12, 2013 the identity of an inmate held in solitary confinement at Israel's Ayalon Prison was known only to a very select group of people. But after the Australian investigative reporting show Foreign Correspondent aired that Tuesday night, the secret was out-"Prisoner X" was a Melbourne man named Ben Zygier and apparently a Mossad agent who'd managed to kill himself inside a suicide-proof cell. But had Zygier been working for the Mossad, or against it? This program is a follow-up to the Foreign Correspondent episode that broke open the Prisoner X case, and in response to which Benjamin Netanyahu called for a media blackout on the story. The program reveals new details about Zygier's activities, giving viewers a better understanding of why the Israeli gov [...]
Online
2013
9.

The Defector [electronic resource]: Escape From North Korea

Sook-ja is one of tens of thousands of North Koreans who have risked death to flee the abusive conditions of Kim Jong-un's regime, but her new life across the border is far from ideal. As an undocumented migrant, she may be exploited for labor or sold as a sex slave. If caught out as a defector she'll be sent back south and likely face imprisonment or even execution. Korean-Canadian filmmaker Ann Shin came to China to document the plight of North Korean defectors like Sook-ja, and learned that many pay human traffickers to smuggle them to safer locations in Asia. This program follows along as Shin, Sook-ja, and a trafficker named Dragon undertake a dangerous journey to Thailand, where Sook-ja can apply for asylum.
Online
2012
10.

China and Human Rights [electronic resource]

In June 1989, Zhang Boli was in Tianamen Square as one of the leaders of the pro-democracy movement. Following the bloody crackdown by China's communist leaders, Boli was able to flee the country before he was captured. This episode tells the story of his two-year trek through northern China, Russia, and finally to America, and examines Boli's secretly filmed profile. Also featured is a discussion on the controversy over China's Most Favored Nation Status as a U.S. trading partner.
Online
1993
11.

UN Human Rights Conference Preview [electronic resource]

The World Conference on Human Rights was held by the United Nations in Vienna, Austria, in 1993. With representatives of 171 nations, and some 7,000 participants overall, it was largest gathering ever on human rights. The conference did have an expansive view of human rights, with the normal political and economic rights being explicitly augmented by women's rights, indigenous peoples' rights, minority rights, and more. This episode looks at the problems, priorities, and players at the conference. UN Secretary-General Boutros-Boutros Ghali, discusses the limitations, universality, the current status, and the future of the United Nations. Also featured are reports on Cambodia's move toward democracy; a human rights advocate becomes president in Guatemala; and families of murder victim [...]
Online
1993
12.

Egypt [electronic resource]: Behind the Revolution

Filmed during the spring of 2011, this program offers an inside look at the events that led to Hosni Mubarak's resignation and a new political era in Egypt. It gives the uprisings in Cairo and other cities historical and cultural context so that viewers can better understand how a powerful, U.S.-backed regime could crumble with minimal violence and in such short order. In addition to a wide-ranging sociopolitical discussion, the film's on-the-ground testimonials fill in important details which, at the time, didn't reach observers outside the country. Egyptians from all walks of life are interviewed, explaining their contributions to Mubarak's fall and offering their reasons for taking to the streets to call for freedom and reforms. From the brewing discontent that preceded the revolu [...]
Online
2011
13.

Made in Germany [electronic resource]: Europe's Economic Superstar

It's almost miraculous: a few scant decades ago, what is now the world's fourth-largest economy was brutally split in two. Today, all of Europe looks to Germany for answers. This documentary examines the nation's economic, social, and cultural power-how it developed at the dawn of the 21st century and how it will continue to shape the EU and the world. Factors for viewers to consider include a national focus on work and industry that values family businesses, solid professional training, and lifetime employment within the same company; environmental policies that emphasize sustainable, efficient energy sources such as solar and wind, enabling even small towns and villages to profit; and an ongoing faith in economic pillars such as Volkswagen, whose Glass Factory in Dresden serves as [...]
Online
2012
14.

China [electronic resource]: From Cartier to Confucius

Surging economic strength, expanding military capabilities, and an undeniable impact on the existing global order-these make up the dramatic narrative of 21st-century China. Meanwhile, a small group of philosophy students at Shanghai's prestigious Fudan University convenes each Friday night to study texts by Confucius and other classical philosophers. These young scholars have embraced-or at least do not disavow-China's consumerist-driven ascendancy, but they are insecure about the lack of principles to guide it. In the process of rediscovering values that were buried during the Cultural Revolution, a core question emerges: Will Confucianism regain more than a tentative foothold amid the fervor of state capitalism? Will the ruling class eventually welcome the ancient ideas and their [...]
Online
2012
15.

The Ingathering [electronic resource]

Ben-Gurion's founding principles of the Israeli state were security and immigration. This program examines the history of Jewish immigration and the conflux of cultures that exist within the broader cultural/religious identity of the Israeli population. In addition to identifying as Jewish, Israelis also identify themselves as Polish, Russian, Hungarian, Romanian, Libyan, Algerian, Yemenite, and Ethiopian. Yet as the Jewish state prospers and grows, the latest wave of immigrants, the Ethiopians, feel unwelcome. The program explores the question of cultural identity and heritage in a multicultural society founded on a principle of inclusion for all Jewish people.
Online
1998
16.

The People's Army [electronic resource]

Born in battle and ever struggling to survive, Israel requires compulsory military service for women as well as men. This program traces the history of the Israel Defense Forces in all of its conflicts, from the war for independence, where many immigrants went directly from their ships into battle; to the formation of Unit 101, the forerunner of the famed and feared paratrooper battalions; to the crack commando teams that protect the borders and police the trouble spots within the country today. The program also includes the details of present-day life in the field with the IDF. As ever, being an Israeli means being a soldier.
Online
1998
17.

From the Orange to the Chip [electronic resource]: Israel's Economic Revolution

In its quest to boost per capita income to the level of Western Europe and the U.S., Israel has progressed from exporting Jaffa oranges to developing high-tech computer chips in just 50 years. This program explores the ups and downs of the economic revolution that has occurred in this arid, resource-poor region surrounded by historically hostile neighbors. Today, technology rather than agriculture is the backbone of Israel's economic vitality, as it continues its drive to maintain its position as a force in the world technology market, leveraging its diverse and talented human capital.
Online
1998
18.

Future Peace, Next War [electronic resource]

At the time of Israel's golden anniversary, it was a nation torn between its political left and right. In this program, the vision of Israel's purpose and scope-and the leaders who have interpreted and shaped that vision-is discussed. From the first Begin/Sadat meeting in Jerusalem to the war against the PLO in Lebanon, from the post-Gulf War peace initiatives to the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin, Israel's history has been a story of the search for a lasting peace, but within the context of almost constant war. Even today, the volatile issues of security and territorial compromise remain unresolved.
Online
1998
19.

A Fair Deal for a Dark Race [electronic resource]: Southeastern Australia, 1937 to 1967

Across the continent, the First Australians were ruled by "protective legislation" that restricted their wages, their ability to travel freely, and their right to marry the partner of their choice. Yorta Yorta man Doug Nicholls crossed the color line when he was recruited to play pro football, but though he had often faced racial discrimination, it wasn't until he encountered starving tribes in Perth that he began to lobby on behalf of his people. This documentary gives an account of Doug Nicholls and the Aboriginal Australians' hard-won gains in their battle for civil rights in the 20th century. Their crusade culminated with the passage in 1967 of a national referendum that - symbolically, at least - acknowledged their status as full Australian citizens. With Doug Nicholls' daughter [...]
Online
2007
20.

We Are No Longer Shadows [electronic resource]: Queensland and the Torres Strait Islands, 1967 to 1992

Eddie Koiki Mabo was born on Murray Island into a community still guided by age-old tribal traditions. Though schooled in Christianity, he respected "Malo's Law" and understood that it insured the Torres Strait Islands would always belong to the First Australians. Mabo found a world of racial injustice when he left Murray Island but what shocked him most was learning that the his ancestral home was actually owned by the Crown due to terra nullius, a doctrine implying that when Europeans came to Australia the continent was not governed by any type of law at all. This documentary tells the story of Mabo v Queensland, the land-rights case that Eddie Mabo brought all the way to Australia's highest court - and won. With Mabo's wife Bonita Mabo, human rights lawyer Frank Brennan, historian [...]
Online
2007