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1.

Gender & Communication: Male-Female Differences in Language & Nonverbal Behavior

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This video explores the impact that gender has on both verbal messages including speech, language, and vocabulary, as well as on nonverbal channels of communication such as touch, movement, and gesture.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
2.

Information Withheld: A Videotape

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Cutting from the Sphinx to Manhattan to northern Chile to Leo Steinberg reading, this tape dramatizes the nature of signs and symbols in an ascending order of complexity, from traffic signals and hieroglyphs to Michelangelo's painting of The Madonna and child with St. Joseph.
VHS
1990; 1983
Ivy (By Request)
3.

Language and Communication

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Shows how language, the primary means of human communication, is expressed in the sounds and movements of every culture to express feelings and aspirations. Discusses the structure of language and its relationship to thought, as well as the significance of body language. Examines dialect, looking at certain Afro-American dialects. Using the example of the Nuer, whose language includes 400 words related to cattle, discusses whether thought reflects or influences culture.
VHS
1994
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Crosstalk at Work

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Shows misunderstandings and communication failures in business caused by cultural differences. Focuses on problems in America for those of Chinese and Korean origin. Explains how different cultural outlooks can lead to unconscious communication breakdown.
VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
5.

The Human Voice: Exploring Vocal Paralanguage

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Explores the voice as an extrordinary human instrument. When we speak, our voice reveals our gender, age, geographic background, level of education, emotional state, and our relationship with the person spoken to. All these clues (and many more) are contained in even small fragments of speech, because our voices can be interpreted with remarkable accuracy. This video, explores the power, dimensions, and facets of this uniquely human instrument.
VHS
1993
Ivy (By Request)
6.

The Video McLuhan

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Presents the most complete video record of communications theorist Marshall McLuhan. Using video footage from the 1940's to the late 1970's, this program traces the development of McLuhan's thinking and takes the viewer through McLuhan's rise to prominence on the world stage. McLuhan discusses and argues his themes in the classroom, on the lecture circuit, on TV talk shows and newsmagazine programs.
VHS
1996
Ivy (By Request)
7.

Miss Representation

Like drawing back a curtain to let bright light stream in, Miss Representation uncovers a glaring reality we live with every day but fail to see. Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, the film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film challenges the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls, which make it difficult for women to achieve leadership positions and for the average woman to feel powerful herself. In a society where media is the most persuasive force shaping cultural norms, the collective message that our young women and men overwhelmingly receive is that a woman’s value and power lie in her youth, beauty, and sexuality, and not in her capacity as [...]
Online
2015; 2011
8.

Hip Hop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes

A riveting examination of masculinity, sexism, and homophobia in hop-hop culture. Delivering a self-described "loving critique" of rap music, director Byron Hurt - a former star college quarterback, longtime hip-hop fan, and now gender violence prevention educator - pays tribute to the power and creativity of hip-hop while challenging the rap industry to take responsibility for glamorizing destructive, deeply conservative sterotypes of manhood. The documentary features revealing insights from rappers such as Mos Def, Fat Joe, Chuck D, Jadakiss, and Busta Rhymes, hop-hop mogul Russell Simmons, and cultural commentators such as Michael Eric Dyson, Beverly Guy-Sheftall, and Kevin Powell. Critically acclaimed for its fearless engagement with issues of race and racism, gender violence, [...]
Online
2016; 2006
9.

Killing Us Softly

In this new, highly anticipated update of her pioneering Killing Us Softly series, the first in more than a decade, Jean Kilbourne takes a fresh look at how advertising traffics in distorted and destructive ideals of femininity. The film marshals a range of new print and television advertisements to lay bare a stunning pattern of damaging gender stereotypes - images and messages that too often reinforce unrealistic, and unhealthy, perceptions of beauty, perfection, and sexuality. By bringing Kilbourne's groundbreaking analysis up to date, Killing Us Softly 4 stands to challenge a new generation of students to take advertising seriously, and to think critically about popular culture and its relationship to sexism, eating disorders, and gender violence.
Online
2016; 2010
10.

Empathy for Health Care Professionals

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Richard M. Frankel, Ph.D. (Indiana University School of Medicine). Through visual illustration and lecture, Dr. Frankel described the changing role of empathy in medical care and the physician patient relationship; the value of empathy versus detached objectivity; current evidence for the efficacy of empathy; a model of empathy, and suggestions for cultivating empathy in learners and organizations.
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
11.

Remembering Chris Jebson: What the Patient Taught Her Doctor

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Laurel W. Rice, M.D. (Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia)and W. Robert Jebson (Husband of former patient, Culpepper, Virginia) presented as a team the story of the relationship that developed between Dr. Rice and Chris and Bob Jebson. At the center of this story was the unfolding of a patient as teacher and a list of top nine teaching points which emerged for Dr. Rice (Quietly sitting with the patient, quietly sitting with self, importance of the medical team, importance of having one person in charge, importance of honesty, importance of humor, importance of understanding the patient's goals, developing long term relationships, appreciating the circle of life). Chris Jebson, whose story was shared, died of advanced ovarian can [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
12.

The Meaning of "Everything": Responding to Patient Requests for Aggressive Treatment at the End of Life

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James A. Tulsky, M.D. (Director, Center for Palliative Care and Associate Professor of Medicine and Nursing; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University School Medicine) discussed the meaning of "everything" as heard in statements such as, "You are going to do everything for my Father, are'nt you?" Additionally, Dr. Tulsky reviewed the past decade of studies on communication, identified and listed barriers to change; and provided solutions to address requests that imply or directly ask for "everything" to be done to keep a person alive. Dr. Tulsky presented the NURSE Model of name, understand, respect, support, and explore the senstive situation of "doing everything" and almost certain impending death.
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
13.

Communicating Evidence for Informed Decision Making

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Ronald Epsten, M.D. (Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry) described the importance of communicating medical information. Dr. Epstein developed five points: (1) Information transfers into an ethical act, (2) Information transfer is inefficient with little concordance, (3) Information needs to be evidence-based , (4) Information is not enough and needs interpretation, and (5) Information transfer is a mutual responsibility between physician and patient. David Slawson, M.D. (Department of Family Medicine, University of Virginia) discussed and defined information mastery and its components: usefulness, validity, relevance, patient oriented evidence versus disease oriented evidence, and two important tools (a first aler [...]
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
14.

Words That Harm, Words That Heal

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Susanna E. Bedell, M.D. (Lown Cardiovascular Center and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School) addressed the types of verbal and written communication that impacts good/healing communication between doctors and patients. Dr. Bedell described in depth the influences of the "letter of condolence" for both the deceased person's loved ones as well as for the physician him/herself. Eugene C. Corbett, M.D. (Division of General Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Care, University of Virginia) responded with comments on "medicine as craft," the importance of continuity of care, how to teach effective interviewing, the importance of the words that patients use with physicians, and the importance of words chosen for the closure of any situation.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
15.

The Good News About Giving Bad News

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The Reverend Kate Braestrup (Chaplain, Maine Warden Service, Lincolnville, Maine), author of "Here if You Need Me," described her participation with the Maine Warden Service. Her assistance at search and rescue missions, accidents, suicides, airplane crashes, etc. had often occured in the woods of Maine and provided a valuable service of communication and comfort. Reverend Braestrup discussed several key concepts instrumental in aiding the delivery of empathic notification of death to family members. Scott A. Syverud, M.D. (Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia) highlighted the value of chaplaincy services and especially in the present time of economic hardship.
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
16.

Communication [electronic resource]

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Includes 18 classroom excerpts from the content standards lessons which show students representing, discussing, reading, writing, and listening as vital parts of learning and using mathematics. Shows how communication fosters an understanding of mathematical ideas and the language of mathematics.
Online
1997
17.

Talking With Children: The Tough Conversations

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Richard Haines, D. Min. (Director, Department of Chaplaincy Services and Pastora Education, University of Virginia) introduced a special award to Dr. Stanton P. Nolan and a thanks to Angel Husted Wright. Marcia Day Childress served as moderator in place of Margaret E. Mohrmann and read the comments she would have made in person. David Waters, Ph.D. (Ruth E. Murdaugh Professor of Family Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, University of Virginia) described four principles proven to be effective in having tough conversations with children such as those concerning the illness or death of a family member or the explanation of a difficult diagnosis. The four principles are based on fostering "reflection:" listening, using questions, following their lead, and not asking "why?" Dr. W [...]
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
18.

Doctor+Doctor: Medical Marriages

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Three physician couples (Laurel Rice and Eugene Foley, Eric Madren and Lisa Madren, and Susan Stephen Lester and William Lester) share their experiences and ideas concerning successful duo career, marriage, and family lifestyles as they address the benefits and challenges of being a doctor partnered with a doctor, from student, resident, and faculty perspectives. The major topics covered are: time and stress management; mutual career development; home and family life; personal growth and satisfaction; and communication.; The learning objectives for this presentation are: (1) Appreciate changing marital paradigms for American physicians as a result of increasing gender parity in medicine and (2) Consider the benefits and challenges of physician-physician marriages.--from flyer.
DVD
1997
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
19.

The Subjective in Medicine: Doctoring and the Nature of Primary Care

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Eric J. Cassell, M.D. (Internist and former Clinical Professor of Public Health, Cornell University Medical College and Member of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission) spoke on the clinical method emphasizing the importance of confidence limits, questions, information as constantly changing, physician as instrument, openness, observation, and the danger of premature closure. According to Dr. Cassell, "It isn't the goal that counts, it's the path." Barbara Tyl Post, M.D. (Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia) summarized the importance of listening and taking time with patients. Eugene C. Corbett, Jr., M.D. (Bernard B. and Anne L. Brodie Teaching Associate Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, University of Virginia) discussed the notion of the "competent cl [...]
DVD
1998
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
20.

Moral Distress in Health Professionals: A Call for Resilience or Retreat?

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Bonnie M. Miller, M.C. (Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery, Professor of Medical Education and Administration, and Senior Associate Dean for Health Science Education, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee) described her research and findings regarding physician development, the "process of becoming," and moral distress among 3rd and 4th year medical students. Dr. Miller also presented correlations with moral distress and burnout as well as the "health of the workplace environment," effective and respectful communication, and physician patient relationships. Anne Bowman, Medical Student (University of Virginia School of Medicine, Class of 2011) spoke on behalf of a medical student interested in moral distress. Ms. Bowman highlighted student expectations, [...]
DVDOnline
2011
Health Sciences (Service Desk)