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1.

Democracy in China [electronic resource]: Billion Small Voices

In China, where approximately 80 percent of the population is rural, the impact of democratic village elections could reshape the future of the nation. Although some Chinese are skeptical, many believe that establishing democracy at the local level will pave the way for a democratic national government. This program focuses on the efforts of The Carter Center to support China's initiative by inviting Chinese delegates to observe U.S. primaries and by sending emissaries to China to assist in the mechanics of gathering and tabulating votes. In its post-Mao effort to catch up economically with other nations, China is opening the door to Western ways and attempting to take its place in the growing Global Village.
Online
2006; 1998
2.

China [electronic resource]: Dance Around Golden Calf

As China continues to experiment with Western-style economics, many city dwellers already enjoy the prerogatives of a market economy. But how will China feed itself as more and more farmers flee their land for the allure of urban living? This program seeks to understand the effects of economic reform on Chinese society, from the villages to the cities. Will cultural values and the traditional arts and sciences retain their importance as China makes its bid for first-world status, or will they and the rest of the old China be swept away by Western attitudes, a burgeoning middle-class, and the country's new identity as a nascent economic powerhouse?
Online
2006; 1997
3.

The New Leap Forward [electronic resource]: Chinese Communist Party in 21st Century

Thanks to reforms first enacted by Jiang Zemin and others, Chinese communism has adopted some remarkably capitalistic ideologies. This landmark program documents the transformation of the Chinese Communist Party as, in its efforts to advance the nation's manufacturing power and extend the benefits of Party membership, it inducts a previously banned member segment: private entrepreneurs. But can the new Communist Party still be called Marxist?
Online
2006; 2003
4.

Hutong [electronic resource]: Alleyways of Change in Contemporary Beijing

As Beijing prepares for the 2008 Olympics, most of the hutong-the city's small traditional dwellings and the network of lanes and alleys formed by them-are being demolished to make room for skyscrapers. This program explores social and cultural changes in historical Beijing, as seen in the life of a few ordinary citizens who still live in the hutong. The program includes computer models of the designing of ancient Beijing City.
Online
2006; 2002
5.

No Rest for the Weary [electronic resource]: Cultural Revolution and Its Origins

From World War II until Mao's death in 1976, the Chinese faced recurring hardships, the Cultural Revolution perhaps the most damaging to their traditional society. This program carefully traces the origins and implementation of Mao's agenda of social upheaval, bringing together documentary footage and firsthand accounts from those who experienced it. Among those interviewed is Song Yongyi, a history professor at Dickinson College who left China in order to write an account of the movement.
Online
2005; 2003
6.

The Unfortunate Generation [electronic resource]: Cultural Revolution and Beyond

Within two years of the Cultural Revolution, armed factions battled each other in Mao's name. To avoid civil war, Mao essentially banished his zealots to the countryside. This program chronicles the Cultural Revolution, its disastrous aftermath, and the role of Mao's wife, Jiang Qing. Scholars, diplomats, and survivors discuss the forced labor camps known as "Schools of May 7th"; the attacks on foreign consulates in Hong Kong and Beijing; China's support of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge; and the trial of the "Gang of Four." The program concludes with Deng Xiaoping opening China to the West.
Online
2005; 2003
7.

East and West: Pt. 1 [electronic resource]

Born into a prominent family in China, Soong Mei-ling was nonetheless thoroughly Western in thought and philosophy, having studied in America-one of the first Chinese women to do so. After marrying Chiang Kai-shek, the couple led a China embroiled in years of war and political intrigue. During World War II, she became the first Chinese national ever to address a joint session of the U.S. Congress and was counted as the fourth luminary of the Cairo Conference, alongside Roosevelt, Churchill, and her husband. This program tells the compelling story of Mme. Chiang up to the ousting of the Chinese Nationalist government.
Online
2006; 2003
8.

Exile Years: Pt. 2 [electronic resource]

After the Chinese Nationalist Government fled to Taiwan, Soong Mei-ling remained in the public eye as the distant and mysterious "Madame Chiang." She continued the role she had played during her years in mainland China, remaining prominent in foreign affairs and devoted to her work with women and charitable causes. This program examines the second half of Madame Chiang's life: her often-fractious relations with her stepson, President Chiang Ching-kuo; her efforts to safeguard the legacy of the Republic of China; and her relocation to the U.S., where she lived in seclusion until her death at the age of 106.
Online
2006; 2003
9.

From Somewhere to Nowhere [electronic resource]: China's Internal Migrant Workers

High-density population centers of enormous size are springing up in China with dizzying speed, and with them comes an increased demand for migrant workers in construction, manufacturing, and mining. Through still images by Andreas Seibert and documentary footage by Villi Hermann, this program travels throughout China to vividly capture the experiences of these mingong, tens of millions on the move from the countryside to the cities in the too-often misplaced hope of building a better life for themselves and their families. An intriguing angle on urbanization fueled by explosive economic growth-and a moving composite portrait of laborers who typically toil in obscurity.
Online
2010; 2009
10.

Mongolia [electronic resource]: Wrestling With Change

Close to the Russian border, far removed from Mongolia's polluted and overcrowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar, an ancient herding culture fights to maintain its identity-and its survival. This program examines the nomadic communities of the Mongolian plains and their resistance to change, despite growing pressure on many herders to modernize and migrate to urban areas. Viewers meet some who hold fast to the old ways and some who have already moved to the city, even though they long for the open landscape and acknowledge that "a Mongolian without a horse is like a bird without wings." Scholar Tsedev Dojoo further explores the impact of Mongolia's new emphasis on commercial agriculture, mineral extraction, and other industries.
Online
2010; 2009
11.

China [electronic resource]: Sustainable Homebuilding

Having overtaken the U.S. as the world's biggest polluter, China is now responsible for 11 percent of all greenhouse gas production. Can the country reduce its carbon footprint without slowing its unprecedented economic growth? This program shows how that question is playing out in the Chinese construction industry, highlighting the creation and practical application of new homebuilding standards. Collaboration between French and Chinese experts has led to groundbreaking insulation techniques-illustrated here in conversations with architects, site managers, building residents, and instructors in the sustainable development program at the Wuhan University of Science and Technology.
Online
2010; 2009
12.

Taiwan [electronic resource]: Dire Strait

A timely, unprecedented look at Taiwan's struggle for direction, this program focuses on President Chen Shui-Bian and his sometimes subtle, sometimes blatant push for independence. The video follows Chen's elaborate attempts to bolster alliances in the region and maintain a favorable image at home-both of which are major challenges as many countries increase ties with Beijing and Chen's domestic opponents gain political strength. A summary of China-Taiwan relations, interviews with opposition leader Su Qi, and commentary from Taiwanese citizens complete this unsettling portrait of a nation that could, through a wrong turn, spark a global military conflict.
Online
2005
13.

Diane Sawyer in China Video Clip Collection [electronic resource]

China's global influence has grown enormously since the turn of the new century. Now the second-largest economy in the world, its citizens are buying up consumer goods both domestically and from abroad in record numbers. In this collection of 12 ABC News segments, anchor Diane Sawyer travels from Beijing to Shanghai exploring life in the Asian nation and the part the U.S. has played in shaping its economic initiatives. Clip duration ranges from 2 to 5 minutes.
Online
2010
14.

China [electronic resource]: Global Factory?

How did China go from agrarian-based communism to being the world's top source for consumer goods? By following three European buyers obtaining wholesale merchandise, this program explores China's manufacturing industry and its attempt to balance economic concerns with political and social ideals. Visiting Chinese factory towns, the buyers meet an ex-communist CEO who talks about what changed after Mao died; manufacturers frustrated by the Western demand for low-cost products made without violating human rights; and workers who say that free housing, even at one room per family, is fair exchange for long hours and low pay. With commentary from economists and historians, the video also examines China's resolve to produce goods for its own middle class, and what European companies are [...]
Online
2010
15.

China's New Development [electronic resource]

Due to its rapidly growing economy and a new demand for consumer goods, China is challenged to create a model for long-term sustainable development. In this program Hazel Henderson talks with Professor Zhouying Jin, author of Global Technological Change, about efforts in China to cultivate a green economy. The country has made great strides in clean energy, and is the world's largest exporter of wind turbines and solar panels. Jin discusses progress in the long-standing impasse with China about the Kyoto Protocol, where it and other less-developed nations argued that they should have the same opportunities that the West had to expand industry without regard to environmental consequences. Part of Ethical Markets 3. (29 minutes)
Online
2010
16.

Richard Nixon's Visit to China, 1972 [electronic resource]

This historical documentary from the CIA Film Library covers President Richard Nixon's visit to Beijing and the Great Wall of China.
Online
2010
17.

The Dragon Ascends [electronic resource]: Creating China's Future

In little more than two decades, China made a leap of industrialization comparable to what took the U.S. a century. This program uses the experiences of entrepreneur Guo Guangchang-called one of China's 100 Richest Business People by Forbes-as a springboard to explore that nation's prospects as the awakened dragon ascends. A grassroots shift toward democratic structures, a new definition of education that promotes individual thought and responsibility, the wealth disparity between the coastal economies and interior provinces, and whether a modernized and prosperous China is ever likely to adopt liberal political and social structures are addressed.
Online
2000
18.

The Power to Predict [electronic resource]: Chinese Astronomy and the Mandate of Heaven

In this program, Dr. Sun Xiaochun and others consider the roles of astronomy and astrology in China as they relate to the Mandate of Heaven: the belief that the power to rule derived from the power to predict the future. Records of ancient sky-watching, divination via oracle bones, revolutionary advances in timekeeping, and the remarkably accurate Chinese calendar are evaluated, as well as the sociopolitical contributions of Confucianism, Taoism, and, later, Christianity. For 3,000 years-until the fall of the last emperor, early in the 20th century-the Mandate was the key to power.
Online
2000
19.

Family Values [electronic resource]: The Chinese Family in Transition

Historically, the traditional extended family has been China's built-in social security system. Today, under the pressures of family size limits, rapid urbanization, and Western cultural influences, China's social stability is being stressed to the breaking point. This program captures a transitional phase of Chinese history in which many parents are struggling to instill Confucian values and their own received wisdom about life into their children-teens and young adults who must weigh filial obedience, social obligations, and acceptance of established gender roles against a yearning for personal space and independence.
Online
2000
20.

The Health Culture [electronic resource]: Traditional Chinese Medicine in the 21st Century

Just as many medical professionals outside China are being attracted to traditional Chinese medicine, the Chinese are fiercely debating its future. This program describes the use of herbal medicines, acupuncture, massage, moxibustion, and qi gong to restore bodily balance as well as remarkable successes in battling cancer with a combination of Chinese and Western medical techniques. But as traditional Chinese medicine merges with Western medicine; as mass-produced herbal preparations replace hand-compounded mixtures; and as the last practitioners trained in the time-tested ways are replaced by university-trained doctors, will TCM still be TCM?
Online
2000