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Brain — Physiology
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1.

First Among Equals

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Film explores the size of the brain, cognitive abilities, and speech. Dr. Susan Greenfield compares the human brain to the brain of a chimpanzee.
DVD
2005
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Mind Talk: The Brain's New Story

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Experts, including Oxford mathematician Sir Roger Penrose, cognitive scientist Dr. Daniel Dennett, and cyber-age technovisionary Jaron Lanier contemplate the social and moral impact of brain research and questions such as how matter developed consciousness, whether computers can model human abilities, how free "free will" really is, and where legal responsibility for actions begins and ends.
DVD
2003; 1998
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

The Mind's Eye

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(Producer) Drawing on the experiences of people with rare forms of brain damage, this program reveals the tricks and shortcuts used by the brain to construct its version-or illusion-of reality. Is seeing really believing?
VHS
2001; 2000
Ivy (By Request)
4.

The Brain Teaching Modules [electronic resource]

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Developed from the original series, "The Brain", these flexible resources offer extensive footage and research into the inner workings of the human brain, including findings on Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, autism, Parkinson's disease, and many other topics. The modules are appropriate for use in general and advanced courses in psychology, abnormal and physiological psychology, neuropsychology, and occupational therapy.
Video Other
1997
5.

The Behaving Brain [electronic resource]

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Explains how understanding the brain's structure and composition offers new insights into human behavior. Scientists explain the bio-chemical reactions that determine human thoughts, feelings and actions. Includes commentary by Dr. John Gabrieli of Stanford University and Dr. Mieke Verfaellie of Veterans Medical Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
Online
2001
6.

The Responsive Brain [electronic resource]

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How does the the brain control behavior and how is it affected by the outside world? Program 4 explores the dynamic relationship between the brain's own structure and function and feedback from the environment. With commentary by Dr. Michael Meaney of McGill University and Dr. Russell Fernald of Stanford University.
Online
2001
7.

Cognitive Neuroscience [electronic resource]

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Explores technology that allows scientists to see the brain at work and identifies some of the functions performed by different parts of the brain. Shows how cognitive neuroscience allies psychologists, biologists, brain researchers, and others in what is perhaps the most dramatic advance in the last decade of psychological research. Includes commentary by Dr. John Gabrieli of Stanford University and Dr. Stephen Kosslyn of Harvard University.
Online
2001
8.

Building Your Brain [electronic resource]

The human brain is so sophisticated it takes more than 20 years to mature, making brain remodeling an essential part of growing up, as this program shows. Viewers find out how a newborn baby makes sense of the world - and meet a 1-year-old who copes with only half a functioning brain, Moken "sea gypsy" children who train themselves to see clearly underwater, a Vietnamese girl who speaks 11 different languages, and a 13-year-old stock car racer who proves that teenagers like to take risks. The video also looks at scans that display just how many brain connections are lost between the ages of 11 and 20.
Online
2011
9.

Hearing and the Cochlea [electronic resource]

As sound waves enter the ear, they travel through the outer ear and the external auditory canal and then strike the eardrum, causing it to vibrate. The central part of the eardrum is connected to a small bone of the middle ear called the malleus (hammer). As the malleus vibrates, it transmits the sound vibrations to the other two small bones or ossicles of the middle ear, the incus and stapes. As the stapes moves, it pushes a structure called the oval window in and out. This action is passed on to the cochlea, which is a fluid-filled snail-like structure that contains the receptor organ for hearing. The cochlea contains the spiral organ of Corti, which is the receptor organ for hearing. It consists of tiny hair cells that translate the fluid vibration of sounds from its surrounding d [...]
Online
2004
10.

Hearing [electronic resource]: Science of the Senses

Our ears may have evolved for purposes of survival, but they also afford us the gift of music. How is it that a melody can "give wings to the mind," as Plato said, and so profoundly affect the human heart? In this program, finding the answer to that question will take viewers on a journey through the ear, into the brain, and straight into the core of the human psyche. Viewers meet world-class neuroscientists like Daniel Levitin, author of This Is Your Brain on Music, and Steven Pinker, author of The Stuff of Thought. Stories and case studies reveal a woman whose brain cannot "hear" music and a deaf musician who is one of the world's top percussionists. Meanwhile, Dr. Blake Papsin of Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children shows how a revolutionary device called the cochlear implant is r [...]
Online
2008
11.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Antonio Damasio - the Quest to Understand Consciousness

Every morning we wake up and regain consciousness - that is a marvelous fact - but what exactly is it that we regain? In this TEDTalk, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio uses this simple question to give us a glimpse into how our brains create our sense of self. Damasio's work has had a major influence on current understanding of our neural systems, which underlie memory, language, and consciousness.
Online
2011
12.

The Nature of Human Nature [electronic resource]

This program introduces what series host Roger Bingham calls "the second Darwinian Revolution"-our new understanding of the evolutionary history of the human brain. Evolutionary psychologists believe that the brain, like the body, is a product of natural selection. Our minds can be thought of as a kind of patchwork quilt of successful solutions to the challenges faced by our ancestors over millions of years. Many scientists think that, because of this shared evolutionary history, we are all inheritors of the same legacy: a universal human nature, which explains why people from different cultures have so much in common.
Online
1995
13.

Consciousness [electronic resource]

Throughout human history, the everyday miracle of consciousness, of being aware, has led philosophers, poets, and mystics to believe that the essence of our being can exist independently of our bodies. This program examines: What do we know about human consciousness at the end of the 20th century? What progress has neuroscience made in explaining consciousness? How does our brain organize the sensory information it receives to create a coherent picture of our world? Will we develop computers that can mimic our sense of self?
Online
1995
14.

The Social Brain [electronic resource]

By nature, humans are a social species. Our brains are wired from birth with programs that were crucial to our distant ancestors. Infants come equipped with a basic repertoire of social skills. And yet, as history has shown, there is a dark side to the human brain. The evidence is overwhelming that throughout our history as a species, relations between individuals and societies have been destructive as well as positive. As series host Roger Bingham explains: "We are living in the Space Age with brains from the Stone Age. We need to 'tune' our psychology, to figure out how to turn up the volume on ancient instincts like cooperation and turn down the volume on instincts like organized aggression.
Online
1995
15.

The Way of Science [electronic resource]

Humans are storytellers, says host Roger Bingham. "Show us the sun, moon, and stars and we'll spin any number of tales about life and death, good and evil. We tell stories to feel at home in the universe." Humans are both mythmakers and scientists. Often, myth and science produce very different stories, different paths to the truth. And yet, they are both products of our brains, trying to make sense of our experience. This program explores the way of science at the end of the 20th century, and the directions it is taking in helping us to know ourselves and to approach the big questions with new information and insight.
Online
1995
16.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Neil Burgess - How Your Brain Tells You Where You Are

How do you remember where you parked your car? How do you know if you're moving in the right direction? In this TEDTalk, neuroscientist Neil Burgess discusses the neural mechanisms that map the space around us and how they link to memory and imagination. At University College in London, Burgess researches how patterns of electrical activity in brain cells guide us through space.
Online
2012
17.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Joshua Foer - Feats of Memory Anyone Can Do

There are people who can quickly memorize lists of thousands of numbers, the order of all the cards in a deck (or ten!), and much more. In this TEDTalk, Joshua Foer describes the technique - called the memory palace - and shows off its most remarkable feature: anyone can learn how to use it, including him. Foer is a science writer who "accidentally" won the U.S. Memory Championship.
Online
2012
18.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Jared Ficklin - New Ways to See Music (With Color! and Fire!)

Designer Jared Ficklin creates wild visualizations that let us see music, using color and even fire (a first for the TED stage) to analyze how sound makes us feel. He takes a brief digression to analyze the sound of a skatepark - and how audio can clue us in to developing creativity.
Online
2012
19.

Moment of Death [electronic resource]

In this program, doctors find new ways to bring people back from the brink of death by using techniques such as therapeutic hypothermia. We'll hear from Bill Bondar, clinically dead from cardiac arrest before cooling helped him recover, and from doctors who believe this therapy can help patients cheat death. We'll visit UCLA's Brain Injury Research Center, where doctors struggle daily to 'awaken' the brains of coma patients as they try to keep them far from the brain death tipping point-and how families deal with this challenge. Dr. Sam Parnia researches whether consciousness can exist independently of the functioning brain. We'll meet people who claim their own vivid near-death experiences help prove the mind can be active when the brain and body are not, raising questions over whet [...]
Online
2008
20.

What Is Science Doing to Treat Alzheimer's and Stroke? [electronic resource]

How much do we really know about the human brain, and what's new when it comes to treatments for brain disease? In this episode, host John Watt introduces viewers to some key players in the world of brain research who are adopting some innovative ways of looking at the human brain and developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease and strokes.
Online
2012